Inverting the classroom, improving student learning

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The traditional classroom model has the transmission of information done in the class and the assimilation of that info done outside the class. But does that make sense? Shouldn't the instructor be the most available to the students when they are working on the hardest tasks? The inverted classroom model says "yes", and puts the lecture outside the class while freeing up time in class to be spent on hard, authentic problems to solve. This talk is all about this inverted model.

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  • Inverting the classroom, improving student learning

    1. 1. INVERTING
THE
 CLASSROOM,
IMPROVING
STUDENT
 LEARNING Robert
Talbert,
Ph.D.Department
of
Mathematics
and
Computing Franklin
College 30
March
2011
    2. 2. Robert
Talbert,
PhDAssociate
Professor
of
Mathematics
and
Computing
Science Franklin
College rtalbert@franklincollege.edu Blog:
http://castingoutnines.wordpress.com
 Twitter:
@RobertTalbert YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/RobertTalbertPhD
    3. 3. AGENDA
    4. 4. AGENDA• Two
phases
of
learning,
and
the
 traditional
classroom
model
    5. 5. AGENDA• Two
phases
of
learning,
and
the
 traditional
classroom
model• The
concept
of
the
inverted
 classroom
model
    6. 6. AGENDA• Two
phases
of
learning,
and
the
 traditional
classroom
model• The
concept
of
the
inverted
 classroom
model• Implementation
case
studies
    7. 7. AGENDA• Two
phases
of
learning,
and
the
 traditional
classroom
model• The
concept
of
the
inverted
 classroom
model• Implementation
case
studies• Tools
and
practices
for
the
 inverted
classroom
    8. 8. AGENDA• Two
phases
of
learning,
and
the
 traditional
classroom
model• The
concept
of
the
inverted
 classroom
model• Implementation
case
studies• Tools
and
practices
for
the
 inverted
classroom• Short‐
and
long‐term
effects
of
 the
inverted
classroom
    9. 9. TWO PHASES OF LEARNING ANDTHE TRADITIONAL CLASSROOM
    10. 10. Human
learning
takes
place
in
two
phases:
    11. 11. Human
learning
takes
place
in
two
phases:TRANSMISSION
    12. 12. Human
learning
takes
place
in
two
phases:TRANSMISSION ASSIMILATION
    13. 13. Human
learning
takes
place
in
two
phases:TRANSMISSION ASSIMILATIONLectures, reading
    14. 14. Human
learning
takes
place
in
two
phases:TRANSMISSION ASSIMILATIONLectures, reading Homework, lab work, cooperative learning, projects
    15. 15. Assimilation
>>
Transmission
from
a
cognitive
standpoint Bloom
(1956)
    16. 16. Assimilation
>>
Transmission
from
a
cognitive
standpoint TRANSMISSION Bloom
(1956)
    17. 17. Assimilation
>>
Transmission
from
a
cognitive
standpointASSIMILATION TRANSMISSION Bloom
(1956)
    18. 18. Potentially serious issue with the traditional model
    19. 19. Potentially serious issue with the traditional model
    20. 20. Potentially serious issue with the traditional model
    21. 21. COGNITIVE
 Potentially serious issue LOAD with the traditional model
    22. 22. COGNITIVE
 Potentially serious issue LOAD with the traditional model ACCESSIBILITY
 OF
HELP
    23. 23. Students
have
the
GREATEST
accessibility
to
expert
learner/content
domain
expert
during
the
 tasks
of
LOWEST
cognitive
complexity.
    24. 24. Students
have
the
GREATEST
accessibility
to
expert
learner/content
domain
expert
during
the
 tasks
of
LOWEST
cognitive
complexity.Students
work
on
tasks
of
GREATEST
cognitive
 complexity
and
DEEPEST
learning
when
 instructor
is
LEAST
accessible.
    25. 25. Students
have
the
GREATEST
accessibility
to
expert
learner/content
domain
expert
during
the
 tasks
of
LOWEST
cognitive
complexity. Students
work
on
tasks
of
GREATEST
cognitive
 complexity
and
DEEPEST
learning
when
 instructor
is
LEAST
accessible.False
sense
of
mastery
    26. 26. Students
have
the
GREATEST
accessibility
to
expert
learner/content
domain
expert
during
the
 tasks
of
LOWEST
cognitive
complexity. Students
work
on
tasks
of
GREATEST
cognitive
 complexity
and
DEEPEST
learning
when
 instructor
is
LEAST
accessible.False
sense
of
mastery Disengagement
    27. 27. Students
have
the
GREATEST
accessibility
to
expert
learner/content
domain
expert
during
the
 tasks
of
LOWEST
cognitive
complexity. Students
work
on
tasks
of
GREATEST
cognitive
 complexity
and
DEEPEST
learning
when
 instructor
is
LEAST
accessible.False
sense
of
mastery Disengagement Academic
dishonesty
    28. 28. Students
have
the
GREATEST
accessibility
to
expert
learner/content
domain
expert
during
the
 tasks
of
LOWEST
cognitive
complexity. Students
work
on
tasks
of
GREATEST
cognitive
 complexity
and
DEEPEST
learning
when
 instructor
is
LEAST
accessible.False
sense
of
mastery Disengagement Academic
dishonesty Shallow
learning
    29. 29. Why is the traditionalclassroom model traditional?
    30. 30. Why is the traditionalclassroom model traditional?
    31. 31. COGNITIVE
 LOAD ACCESSIBILITY
 OF
HELP
    32. 32. COGNITIVE
 LOAD ACCESSIBILITY
 OF
HELP
    33. 33. COGNITIVE
 ACCESSIBILITY
 LOAD OF
HELP
    34. 34. THE INVERTED CLASSROOM MODEL
    35. 35. By
“inverting”
the
classroom
we
mean:TRANSMISSION ASSIMILATION In class Outside of class
    36. 36. By
“inverting”
the
classroom
we
mean: ASSIMILATION TRANSMISSION In class Outside of class
    37. 37. By
“inverting”
the
classroom
we
mean:ASSIMILATION TRANSMISSION In class Outside of class
    38. 38. TRANSMISSION
    39. 39. BEFORE
CLASS:TRANSMISSION
    40. 40. BEFORE
CLASS:TRANSMISSION
    41. 41. BEFORE
CLASS:TRANSMISSION
    42. 42. BEFORE
CLASS:TRANSMISSION
    43. 43. BEFORE
CLASS:TRANSMISSION
    44. 44. IN
CLASS:
    45. 45. IN
CLASS:
    46. 46. The
basic
inverted
classroom
workflow
    47. 47. The
basic
inverted
classroom
workflow GIVEN: Print/video resources for basic information List of clearly-stated learning objectives Exercises on basic skills
    48. 48. The
basic
inverted
classroom
workflow GIVEN: Print/video resources for basic information List of clearly-stated learning objectives Exercises on basic skills On to the next topicViewing/reading for Guided practice for basic information basic skills INTO THE CLASS MEETING Quiz ASSIMILATION (to reinforce individual Further problems/HW PROBLEMS mastery)
    49. 49. CASE STUDY:COMPUTER TOOLS FOR PROBLEM SOLVING
    50. 50. CMP
150:
Computer
Tools
for
Problem
Solving Franklin
College1‐credit
intro
to
MATLAB
and
programming
for
students
going
 on
to
Calculus
III
and
Linear
algebra
    51. 51. CMP
150:
Computer
Tools
for
Problem
Solving Franklin
College1‐credit
intro
to
MATLAB
and
programming
for
students
going
 on
to
Calculus
III
and
Linear
algebra !"#$"%&$"()*$"+%#,%&$-./)"%(&#),&)% ()*+,(-,.//0)-$ %&#$ 0)1,($1($23$ 40,51*56/6516,$277$ !"#$
    52. 52. CMP
150:
Computer
Tools
for
Problem
Solving Franklin
College1‐credit
intro
to
MATLAB
and
programming
for
students
going
 on
to
Calculus
III
and
Linear
algebra !"#$"%&$"()*$"+%#,%&$-./)"%(&#),&)% !"#$%&$(&)*+,-)&)"./-0!12314 5$*%&,")6%"-.7/-8$77,0, (" " &" ()*+,(-,.//0)-$ %&#$ 0)1,($1($23$ %" $" 40,51*56/6516,$277$ !"#$ #" !" )*+," 56678,9" -./0,1.234" 56678,9" <7,1,=/.+@" A/0,+" -./0,1.234" -./0:"%;$" <9*3.2?=" -./0:"=?/" <9*3.2?=" <=>8=,,+8=>" ,=>8=,,+8=>"
    53. 53. CMP
150:
Computer
Tools
for
Problem
Solving Franklin
College 1‐credit
intro
to
MATLAB
and
programming
for
students
going
 on
to
Calculus
III
and
Linear
algebra !"#$"%&$"()*$"+%#,%&$-./)"%(&#),&)% !"#$%&$(&)*+,-)&)"./-0!12314 5$*%&,")6%"-.7/-8$77,0, (" " &" ()*+,(-,.//0)-$ %&#$ 0)1,($1($23$ %" $" 40,51*56/6516,$277$ !"#$ #" !" )*+," 56678,9" -./0,1.234" 56678,9" <7,1,=/.+@" A/0,+" -./0,1.234" -./0:"%;$" <9*3.2?=" -./0:"=?/" <9*3.2?=" <=>8=,,+8=>" ,=>8=,,+8=>" Liberal
arts
focus:
Lifelong
learning,
intellectual
self‐feeding,
problem
solving,
technical
analysis
of
problems
    54. 54. Tools
for
work
in
CMP
150
    55. 55. Tools
for
work
in
CMP
150 Guided
Practice Overview List
of
competencies Screencast
links Tasks
to
perform
    56. 56. Tools
for
work
in
CMP
150 Guided
Practice Overview List
of
competencies Screencast
links Tasks
to
perform Clicker
quiz
    57. 57. Tools
for
work
in
CMP
150 Guided
Practice Overview List
of
competencies Screencast
links Tasks
to
perform Clicker
quiz Lab
Problem
Sets
    58. 58. Tools
for
work
in
CMP
150 Guided
Practice Overview List
of
competencies Screencast
links Tasks
to
perform Clicker
quiz Lab
Problem
SetsAlso:
Student
projects,
final
exam
    59. 59. A
week
in
the
life
of
CMP
150 Lab Problem Set from Wednesday due by 11:00 PM One task from QUIZ at beginning of class New Guided Guided Practice LAB PROBLEM SETS during classPractice assigned due ROUGH DRAFT due at end of class rs s s s on n t ed ed i e Sa u Fr Su Tu M Th W W Watch screencasts Finish GP tasks, rewatch screencasts, and work GP tasks office hours/email Example of a typical cycle at the class blog
    60. 60. CASE STUDY:CALCULUS III
    61. 61. Problem:
Train
students
on
MATLAB
3D
visualization
functionality
without
taking
up
too
much
class
time.
    62. 62. Problem:
Train
students
on
MATLAB
3D
visualization
functionality
without
taking
up
too
much
class
time.
    63. 63. TOOLS AND PRACTICES FORTHE INVERTED CLASSROOM
    64. 64. Video
podcast
/
screencast
creation
    65. 65. Video
podcast
/
screencast
creation Jing
    66. 66. Video
podcast
/
screencast
creation Jing Camtasia
    67. 67. Video
podcast
/
screencast
creation Jing CamtasiaWACOM
tablet
    68. 68. Video
podcast
/
screencast
creation Jing CamtasiaWACOM
tablet Keynote
    69. 69. Pre‐existing
video
resources
    70. 70. Pre‐existing
video
resources
    71. 71. Pre‐existing
video
resources
    72. 72. Pre‐existing
video
resources
    73. 73. Video
hosting
and
access
    74. 74. Video
hosting
and
access
    75. 75. Video
hosting
and
access
    76. 76. Video
hosting
and
access
    77. 77. CREATING EFFECTIVE GUIDED PRACTICE
    78. 78. CREATING EFFECTIVE GUIDED PRACTICE• Givestudents a sense of what’s ahead and where it fits with what they know
    79. 79. CREATING EFFECTIVE GUIDED PRACTICE• Givestudents a sense of what’s ahead and where it fits with what they know• Organize around minimal amount of important ideas
    80. 80. CREATING EFFECTIVE GUIDED PRACTICE• Givestudents a sense of what’s ahead and where it fits with what they know• Organize around minimal amount of important ideas• Give sufficient but not onerous amount of out-of-class work
    81. 81. CREATING EFFECTIVE GUIDED PRACTICE• Givestudents a sense of what’s ahead and where it fits with what they know• Organize around minimal amount of important ideas• Give sufficient but not onerous amount of out-of-class work• Set up clear competencies to master by class time
    82. 82. CREATING EFFECTIVE GUIDED PRACTICE• Givestudents a sense of what’s ahead and where it fits with what they know• Organize around minimal amount of important ideas• Give sufficient but not onerous amount of out-of-class work• Set up clear competencies to master by class time• Design small number of tasks that guide through those competencies
    83. 83. QUIZZES
    84. 84. QUIZZES• Short, inexpensive
    85. 85. QUIZZES• Short, inexpensive• Purpose: Individual accountability
    86. 86. QUIZZES• Short, inexpensive• Purpose: Individual accountability• Clickers allow instant feedback and grading that can be addressed right away in the class
    87. 87. CMP 150Quiz for March 16
    88. 88. Instructions• This quiz consists of 4 multiple choice questions and one short answer question.• Use the clickers to answer the multiple choice questions and the notecard to respond to the short answer question.• You will have up to one minute to answer each multiple choice question.• You may use MATLAB at any time, although it will take less time to answer conceptually.
    89. 89. Question 1What should go in the blank in order to have the FORloop start the counter at 0, increment by 20, and end at 100? for
i
=
_____________(A) linspace(0,
100,
20)(B) 0:5:100(C) 0:20:100(D) 0:100:20(E) 20:0:100
    90. 90. Question 2 What MATLAB term always ends a FOR loop?(A) END(B) FINISH(C) ROF(D) STOP(E) No ending term is necessary
    91. 91. Question 3 The code on the left constructs a vector v. What does MATLAB return if you type v(3) after running the code?v = [ ]; (A) 0for i = 0:2:10 (B) 3 v = [v i];end (C) 4 (D) 6 (E) An error message
    92. 92. Question 4sum = 0; What is the value of sumfor i = 2:1:10 after running the code on if isprime(i) the left? sum = sum + 1; (A) 0 endend (B) 4Reminder: ISPRIME(n) is 1 if (C) 10 n is a prime number and 0 otherwise. (D) 17Prime numbers less than 20: (E) An error message occurs 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19.
    93. 93. Question 5 (Short Answer; 1 point)What’s one question you have remainingafter this week’s videos, Guided Practice, and Quiz? Write your question down on the notecard along with your name.
    94. 94. IMPACT ON STUDENTS
    95. 95. RESPONSES
FROM
CMP
150
ALUMNI
SURVEY,
 FALL
2010
    96. 96. RESPONSES
FROM
CMP
150
ALUMNI
SURVEY,
 FALL
2010 How
to
solve
a
problem
by
writing
an
 algorithm
and
how
to
think
about
a
 problem
logically.
 Being
able
to
use
the
help
in
MATLAB
 effectively.
I
never
used
the
help
section
 in
a
program
before.

    97. 97. RESPONSES
FROM
CMP
150
ALUMNI
SURVEY,
 FALL
2010 How
to
solve
a
problem
by
writing
an
 algorithm
and
how
to
think
about
a
 problem
logically.
 Being
able
to
use
the
help
in
MATLAB
 effectively.
I
never
used
the
help
section
 in
a
program
before.
 I
learned
that
discovering
things
on
my
own
 is
generally
more
beneficial
than
having
 things
spelled
out.

    98. 98. !"#$%&()*+,-$."$-")$)/$012314$ !"#$%&()*+,-$."$-")$)/$012314$ 5)/+$6*$012$789:$ ")+/5.$"%$012$6789$ " " &" &" %" %" $" $" #" #" !" !" ()*+" 3-.*)/0)-12+" 4)01*52" 6*)/0)-12+" ()*+".*)/0)-12+" ()*+" 3-.*)/0)-12+" 4)01*52" 6*)/0)-12+" ()*+".*)/0)-12+" ,-.*)/0)-12+" ,-.*)/0)-12+" !"#$%&(")*+,-$,&(*#"."#* " !"#$%&%()%*+$,-$+".$,/.01%$-%#$ &" 230**2$451".65$1%,70-6$"1$)0%#0-6$810-4$ ,-7$)07%"$1%2".1%29$ %" )" (" $" 9:2;"<=>?=@" " #" 9:2;"./0A,2)*B":-"C)-)*35"2/" &" B/5D)"032;"A*/45)0B" %" !" $" #" " " " " 5" 5) 5) 5) 5) 2*3 4 4 4 4 23 23 23 23 , 7) !" * * * * 1/ 1/ 1/ 1/ /0 /0 0 0 ./ 8/ -. -. *+,-"./+0+123+4-" 5/+0+123+4-" 6+78,94" :0+123+4-" *+,-"+0+123+4-" 6- +", +", * *() ()
    99. 99. Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire*Please rate the following items based on your behavior in this class. Your rating should be on a 7 -point scale where 1= not at all true of me to 7=very true of me . 1. I prefer class work that is challenging so I can learn new things. 2. Compared with other students in this class I expect to do well 3. I am so nervous during a test that I cannot remember facts I have learned 4. It is important for me to learn what is being taught in this class 5. I like what I am learning in this class 6. I’m certain I can understand the ideas taught in this course 7. I think I will be able to use what I learn in this class in other classes 8. I expect to do very well in this class 9. Compared with others in this class, I think I’m a good student 10. I often choose paper topics I will learn something from even if they require more work 11. I am sure I can do an excellent job on the problems and tasks assigned for this class 12. I have an uneasy, upset feeling when I take a test Pilot
study:
Current
CMP
150
class,
pre/post
test
with
 13. I think I will receive a good grade in this class 14. Even when I do poorly on a test I try to learn from my mistakes MSLQ;
preliminary
data
in
May
2011 15. I think that what I am learning in this class is useful for me to know 16. My study skills are excellent compared with others in this class 17. I think that what we are learning in this class is interesting
    100. 100. FOR MORE INFORMATION
    101. 101. Cannod, G., Burge, J., and Helmick, M. “Using theinverted classroom to teach software engineering”.http://drcmia.ohiolink.edu/bitstream/handle/2374.MIA/206/fulltext.pdfLage, M. J.,Platt, G. J. & Treglia, M. “Inverting theclassroom: A gateway to creating an inclusive learningenvironment”. Journal of Economic Education, 30(1):2000.McShea, J. “The Inverted Classroom”, http://www.hg2s.com/blog/tag/inverted-classroom/McDaniel, S., forthcoming article in Journal ofDevelopmental Education
    102. 102. http://blog.ted.com/2011/03/09/lets-use-video-to-reinvent- education-salman-khan-on-ted-com/
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