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Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers
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Deconstructing Columnar Transposition Ciphers

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This talk explores some of the properties of the columnar transposition cipher, a classical encryption technique that uses a rectangular grid structure to shuffle the characters of the plaintext. This …

This talk explores some of the properties of the columnar transposition cipher, a classical encryption technique that uses a rectangular grid structure to shuffle the characters of the plaintext. This means that the columnar transposition cipher is a permutation, and the group theoretic structure of the cipher admits some interesting features.

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  • 1. Deconstructing columnar transposition ciphers Robert Talbert, PhD. Department of Mathematics Grand Valley State University talbertr@gvsu.edu Twitter: @RobertTalbert Google+: google.com/+RobertTalbert 11.07.2013 R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 1 / 33
  • 2. Prelude LOOK IN THE REFRIGERATOR R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 2 / 33
  • 3. Prelude LOOK IN THE REFRIGERATOR LOOKINTHEREFRIGERATOR R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 2 / 33
  • 4. Prelude LOOK IN THE REFRIGERATOR LOOKINTHEREFRIGERATOR L K T R R E T R. Talbert (GVSU) O I H E I R O O N E F G A R Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 2 / 33
  • 5. Prelude LOOK IN THE REFRIGERATOR LOOKINTHEREFRIGERATOR L K T R R E T O I H E I R O O N E F G A R LKTRRETOIHEIROONEFGAR R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 2 / 33
  • 6. Prelude LOOK IN THE REFRIGERATOR LOOKINTHEREFRIGERATOR L K T R R E T O I H E I R O O N E F G A R LKTRRETOIHEIROONEFGAR A columnar transposition cipher (using three columns) R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 2 / 33
  • 7. LOOKINTHEREFRIGERATOR −→ LKTRRETOIHEIROONEFGAR R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 3 / 33
  • 8. LOOKINTHEREFRIGERATOR −→ LKTRRETOIHEIROONEFGAR L R T H R N G K R O E O E A T E I I −→ LRTHRNGKROEOEATEIIOFR O F R R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 3 / 33
  • 9. LOOKINTHEREFRIGERATOR −→ LKTRRETOIHEIROONEFGAR L R T H R N G K R O E O E A T E I I −→ LRTHRNGKROEOEATEIIOFR O F R L H G O E E O R R K E A I F T N R O −→ LHGOEEORRKEAIFTNROTIR T I R R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 3 / 33
  • 10. LHGOEEORRKEAIFTNROTIR R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 4 / 33
  • 11. LHGOEEORRKEAIFTNROTIR L O O K I N T R. Talbert (GVSU) H E R E F R I G E R A T O R Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 4 / 33
  • 12. LHGOEEORRKEAIFTNROTIR L O O K I N T H E R E F R I G E R A T O R LOOKINTHEREFRIGERATOR R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 4 / 33
  • 13. LHGOEEORRKEAIFTNROTIR L O O K I N T H E R E F R I G E R A T O R LOOKINTHEREFRIGERATOR After four rounds of encryption, we have the original message. Also, three characters in the messages never moved. R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 4 / 33
  • 14. Questions 1 Why do columnar transposition ciphers cycle back on themselves, and what’s the smallest number of encryption steps needed to make this happen? R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 5 / 33
  • 15. Questions 1 Why do columnar transposition ciphers cycle back on themselves, and what’s the smallest number of encryption steps needed to make this happen? 2 What characters in a message are fixed in place by a columnar transposition cipher, and is there an efficient way to predict where they will be? R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 5 / 33
  • 16. Questions 1 Why do columnar transposition ciphers cycle back on themselves, and what’s the smallest number of encryption steps needed to make this happen? 2 What characters in a message are fixed in place by a columnar transposition cipher, and is there an efficient way to predict where they will be? 3 What else can we say about the security of this cipher? R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 5 / 33
  • 17. How encryption and ciphers work in general Goal: Transform information into format readable only by sender and chosen recipients. Readable message Plaintext EK(M) Transformed message Ciphertext KEY DK(EK(M)) Readable message Plaintext KEY Assume that the information is being sent over an open channel. Ciphertext should yield little/no information about the original contents of the message. R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 6 / 33
  • 18. Example: Shift cipher Key: Positive integer s, decided upon in advance by sender and recipient Encryption process: Shift every letter in the message forward in the alphabet by s positions, wrapping around the end of the alphabet if necessary. Example: Suppose s = 20 and encrypt MATH RULES. M G A U T N H B R L U O L F E Y S M Ciphertext: GUNBLOFYM. Decrypt by shifting backwards by 20... or forwards by . R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 7 / 33
  • 19. Interlude: Integer congruence modulo n Definition Let n be any positive integer and a, b integers. We say that a is congruent to b modulo n if n divides b − a. Notation: a ≡ b (mod n). Examples: 12 ≡ 5 (mod 7) 8675309 ≡ 9 (mod 10) −20 ≡ 6 (mod 26) 780 ≡ 0 (mod 26) The smallest natural number to which a is congruent modulo n = Remainder left over when dividing a by n. R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 8 / 33
  • 20. Mathematizing the shift cipher Number letters 0, 1, . . . , 25 Key: Positive integer s Es (m) = (m + s) (mod 26) Ds (m) = (m + (26 − s)) (mod 26) R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 9 / 33
  • 21. Mathematizing the shift cipher Number letters 0, 1, . . . , 25 Key: Positive integer s Es (m) = (m + s) (mod 26) Ds (m) = (m + (26 − s)) (mod 26) Original Number-fied +key mod 26 Letter-fied M 12 32 6 G A 0 20 20 U Ds (Es (m)) = m + s + 26 − s R. Talbert (GVSU) T 19 39 13 N H 7 27 1 B R 17 37 11 L U 20 40 14 O L 11 31 5 F (mod 26) = m + 26 Deconstructing CTCs E 4 24 24 Y S 18 38 12 M (mod 26) = m 11.07.2013 9 / 33
  • 22. Columnar transposition ciphers Message length = L (remove spaces, punctuation, etc.) R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 10 / 33
  • 23. Columnar transposition ciphers Message length = L (remove spaces, punctuation, etc.) Key: Positive integer C R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 10 / 33
  • 24. Columnar transposition ciphers Message length = L (remove spaces, punctuation, etc.) Key: Positive integer C Encryption: Feed characters of message into a rectangular grid, C columns and L/C rows one row at a time. R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 10 / 33
  • 25. Columnar transposition ciphers Message length = L (remove spaces, punctuation, etc.) Key: Positive integer C Encryption: Feed characters of message into a rectangular grid, C columns and L/C rows one row at a time. Decryption: Read off characters from the grid one column at a time. R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 10 / 33
  • 26. CTC Example: C = 3, L = 9 M T H R U L MATH RULES A E S EK(M) MHLARETUS C=3 R. Talbert (GVSU) DK(EK(M)) MATH RULES C=3 Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 11 / 33
  • 27. Same message, different C If C = 2: M T MATHRULES −→ R L S A H U −→ MTRLSAHUE E The ciphertext depends on both the message length L and the number C of columns. R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 12 / 33
  • 28. CTCs are functions The CTC with C = 3, L = 9 is a one-to-one, onto function {0, 1, 2, . . . , 8} → {0, 1, 2, . . . , 8} M T H R U L E S 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 M H L A R E T U S 0 n f (n) A 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 3 1 4 4 0 0 1 3 2 6 n R. Talbert (GVSU) 6 3 1 Deconstructing CTCs 8 8 3 2 7 5 0 1 6 2 f(n) 0 5 7 11.07.2013 13 / 33
  • 29. CTCs are functions The CTC with C = 3, L = 9 is a one-to-one, onto function {0, 1, 2, . . . , 8} → {0, 1, 2, . . . , 8} M T H R U L E S 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 M H L A R E T U S 0 n f (n) A 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 3 1 4 4 0 0 n 1 3 2 6 5 7 6 2 7 5 8 8 7 8 8 4 f(n) Let g be the CTC using 02 columns on 9 characters. 0 n g (n) R. Talbert (GVSU) 10 1 3 20 5 6 2 1 3 6 4 2 3 1 Deconstructing CTCs 5 7 6 3 11.07.2013 13 / 33
  • 30. Permutations Definition A permutation on a finite set X is a bijection X → X . R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 14 / 33
  • 31. Permutations Definition A permutation on a finite set X is a bijection X → X . n f (n) 0 0 1 3 2 6 3 1 4 4 5 7 6 2 7 5 8 8 Notation: f = (1, 3)(2, 6)(5, 7). Each group = cycle. 0, 4, 8 = fixed points. So this f is a product of disjoint 2-cycles. R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 14 / 33
  • 32. Permutations Definition A permutation on a finite set X is a bijection X → X . n f (n) 0 0 1 3 2 6 3 1 4 4 5 7 6 2 7 5 8 8 Notation: f = (1, 3)(2, 6)(5, 7). Each group = cycle. 0, 4, 8 = fixed points. So this f is a product of disjoint 2-cycles. n g (n) 0 0 1 5 2 1 3 6 4 2 5 7 6 3 7 8 8 4 g = (1, 5, 7, 8, 4, 2)(3, 6). Disjoint product of a 6-cycle and a 2-cycle. Theorem (Cayley) Every permutation can be written as a product of disjoint cycles. R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 14 / 33
  • 33. CTCs and permutations Every CTC with C columns enciphering a message of length L is a permutation on {0, 1, . . . , L − 1}. Notation: πC ,L . Example π3,9 = (1, 3)(2, 6)(5, 7) π2,9 = (1, 5, 7, 8, 4, 2)(3, 6) π3,21 = (1, 7, 9, 3)(2, 14, 18, 6)(4, 8, 16, 12)(5, 15)(11, 17, 19, 13) π4,77 = (1, 20, 5, 21, 25, 26, 45, 31, 65, 36, 9, 22, 44, 11, 60, 15, 61, 35, 66, 55, 71, 75, 76, 19, 62, 54, 52, 13, 23, 63, 73, 38, 48, 12, 3, 58, 53, 33, 28, 7, 59, 72, 18, 43, 68, 17, 24, 6, 40, 10, 41, 30, 46, 50, 51, 70, 56, 14, 42, 49, 32, 8, 2, 39, 67, 74, 57, 34, 47, 69, 37, 29, 27, 64, 16, 4) Demo: Python function to generate the cycle breakdown of πC ,L . R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 15 / 33
  • 34. Will repeated encryption using a CTC always eventually lead back to the plaintext? R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 16 / 33
  • 35. Will repeated encryption using a CTC always eventually lead back to the plaintext? YES because of the cyclical nature of permutations. Example: π3,9 = (1, 3)(2, 6)(5, 7) n 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 R. Talbert (GVSU) π3,9 (n) 0 3 6 1 4 7 2 5 8 (π3,9 ◦ π3,9 )(n) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 16 / 33
  • 36. Will repeated encryption using a CTC always eventually lead back to the plaintext? YES because of the cyclical nature of permutations. Example: π3,9 = (1, 3)(2, 6)(5, 7) Example: π3,21 n π3,9 (n) (π3,9 ◦ π3,9 )(n) 0 0 0 1 3 1 6 2 2 1 3 3 4 4 4 5 7 5 2 6 6 7 5 7 8 8 8 = (1, 7, 9, 3)(2, 14, 18, 6)(4, 8, 16, 12)(5, 15)(11, 17, 19, 13) repeats itself after four iterations. R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 16 / 33
  • 37. Definition The order of the columnar transposition πC ,L is the smallest positive integer such that k πC ,L ◦ πC ,L ◦ · · · ◦ πC ,L = πC ,L = identity function k times Fact Every permutation has a finite order, and that order is the least common multiple of the lengths of the cycles in its disjoint cycle factorization. R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 17 / 33
  • 38. Definition The order of the columnar transposition πC ,L is the smallest positive integer such that k πC ,L ◦ πC ,L ◦ · · · ◦ πC ,L = πC ,L = identity function k times Fact Every permutation has a finite order, and that order is the least common multiple of the lengths of the cycles in its disjoint cycle factorization. Can we determine the order of πC ,L using only the values of C and L? R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 17 / 33
  • 39. Formula for πC ,L Results following are from R. Talbert, “The cycle structure and order of the rail fence cipher”, Cryptologia, 30(2):159—172, 2006 Theorem (The Big Formula) Let πC ,L be the permutation underlying a columnar transposition cipher with C columns and text length L. Let 0 ≤ n < L, n = n mod C , and L = L mod C . Then:  L  n−n  − (n − L ) if L = 0 and n > L   C +n  C πC ,L (n) =  n−n  L   +n otherwise  C C R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 18 / 33
  • 40. Illustration of The Big Formula: π4,26 0 11 L/C n = number of columns preceding the column containing n n L/C = number of entries counted in columns preceding n 13 n − n = position of first character in n’s row (n − n )/C = number of rows preceding row containing n 25 C π4,26 (13) = 7 + 3 = 10 (n − n )/C + n L/C = ending position of n if no blanks encountered. L = number of blanks in last row π4,26 (11) = (3(7) − 1) + 2 = 22 R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 19 / 33
  • 41. The rail fence cipher CTC with 2 columns = π2,L , the rail fence cipher. Since C = 2, n and L are 0 or 1, so: Theorem (RFC Formula) Let π2,L be the permutation for a rail fence cipher on a plaintext of length L. Let n be an integer with 0 ≤ n L. Then:  n  n even   2   n+L n odd, L odd π2,L (n) =  2  n+L−1    n odd, L even 2 R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 20 / 33
  • 42. The initial cycle Definition The initial cycle of πC ,L is the cycle in the decomposition of πC ,L that contains the number 1. Example π2,15 = (1, 8, 4, 2)(3, 9, 12, 6)(5, 10)(7, 11, 13, 14) π2,21 = (1, 11, 16, 8, 4, 2)(3, 12, 6)(5, 13, 17, 19, 20, 10)(7, 14)(9, 15, 18) R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 21 / 33
  • 43. Group structure of the initial cycle Theorem 1 2 If L = 2k − 1 for some k 1, then the initial cycle of π2,L = (1, 2k−1 , 2k−2 , · · · , 4, 2). k For any positive integers k and L, π2,L (1) = 2l1 −k mod L where l1 is the length of the initial cycle. R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 22 / 33
  • 44. Group structure of the initial cycle Theorem 1 2 If L = 2k − 1 for some k 1, then the initial cycle of π2,L = (1, 2k−1 , 2k−2 , · · · , 4, 2). k For any positive integers k and L, π2,L (1) = 2l1 −k mod L where l1 is the length of the initial cycle. Corollary The initial cycle of π2,L is the cyclic subgroup generated by 2 in Z∗ . L R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 22 / 33
  • 45. Connecting initial cycle to other cycles Example π2,15 = (1, 8, 4, 2) (3, 9, 12, 6) (5, 10, 5, 10) (7, 11, 13, 14) R. Talbert (GVSU) π2,21 = (1, 11, 16, 8, 4, 2) (3, 12, 6, 3, 12, 6) (5, 13, 17, 19, 20, 10) (7, 14, 7, 14, 7, 14) (9, 15, 18, 9, 15, 18) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 23 / 33
  • 46. Connecting initial cycle to other cycles Example π2,15 = (1, 8, 4, 2) (3, 9, 12, 6) (5, 10, 5, 10) (7, 11, 13, 14) π2,21 = (1, 11, 16, 8, 4, 2) (3, 12, 6, 3, 12, 6) (5, 13, 17, 19, 20, 10) (7, 14, 7, 14, 7, 14) (9, 15, 18, 9, 15, 18) Theorem Suppose L is odd. For all x ∈ {0, 1, · · · L − 1}, π2,L (x) = (π2,L (1) · x) mod L. R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 23 / 33
  • 47. Theorem Suppose L is odd. If γ is a cycle of π2,L , then the length of γ divides the length of the initial cycle, and hence the order of π2,L is the length of the initial cycle. Proof: Let orb(1) denote the initial cycle of π2,L . This is a group with k typical element π2,L (1). Define a group action of orb(1) on a cycle γ of π2,L : k k π2,L (1) · x = π2,L (x) Exercise: This really is a group action, and if x ∈ γ, then Fx = {g ∈ orb(1) : g · x = x mod L} is a subgroup of orb(1). Classical group theory implies |orb(1)/Fx | = |γ|. R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 24 / 33
  • 48. Things fall apart when C 2 Example π3,19 = (1, 7, 9, 3)(2, 13, 11, 16, 12, 4, 8, 15, 5, 14, 17, 18, 6) Cycles of lengths 4 and 13 (order = 4 × 13 = 52) Nontrivial fixed point: 10 Initial cycle does not end in descending powers of 3 mod 19 Initial cycle does not act nicely on the long cycle It’s not currently known exactly how the cycle structure of πC ,L is organized if C 2. R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 25 / 33
  • 49. Question 2: Are there characters in the message that are fixed by a CTC? R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 26 / 33
  • 50. Question 2: Are there characters in the message that are fixed by a CTC? YES: The first character is always fixed. The last character is fixed if and only if C divides L. But what about “nontrivial” fixed points? R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 26 / 33
  • 51. Question 2: Are there characters in the message that are fixed by a CTC? YES: The first character is always fixed. The last character is fixed if and only if C divides L. But what about “nontrivial” fixed points? Research with Beth Bjorkman (GVSU mathematics undergrad): “Fixed points of columnar transposition ciphers” R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 26 / 33
  • 52. Where nontrivial fixed points don’t appear Each column of the enciphering grid for πC ,L can contain at most one fixed point. Corollary: If n is a nonzero character position and C divides n, then n is not fixed. Corollary: If n is a character position and n ≡ −1 (mod C ), then n is not fixed if C divides L; and if C does not divide L, n is fixed if and only if n = L − 1. Several other formulas lead to a constant-time algorithm for locating fixed points. (→ Demo) R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 27 / 33
  • 53. What’s not known (yet) R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 28 / 33
  • 54. The One Big Cycle problem When does πC ,L consist of just one big cycle? Example π2,13 = (1, 7, 10, 5, 9, 11, 12, 6, 3, 8, 4, 2) π3,29 = (1, 10, 13, 14, 24, 8, 22, 17, 25, 18, 6, 2, 20, 26, 28, 19, 16, 15, 5, 21, 7, 12, 4, 11, 23, 27, 9, 3) π6,21 = (1, 4, 15, 14, 10, 16, 17, 20, 11, 19, 7, 5, 18, 3, 12, 2, 8, 9, 13, 6) R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 29 / 33
  • 55. Data about OBC L-values for which πC ,L is one big cycle (10 ≤ L ≤ 500) C 2 3 4 5 6 L ∈ [10, 500] yielding OBC 11, 13, 19, 29, 37, 53, 59, 61, 67, 83, 101, 131, 139, 149, 163, 173, 179, 181, 197, 227, 269, 293, 317, 347, 349, 373, 379, 419, 421, 443, 461, 467, 491 17, 29, 53, 89, 101, 113, 137, 149, 173, 233, 257, 269, 281, 293, 317, 353, 389, 449, 461 77 None∗ 11, 17, 21, 41, 59, 83, 89, 107, 113, 131, 179, 227, 233, 247, 251, 257, 347, 381, 419, 443, 449, 467, 491 ∗First value for C = 5 that gives OBC is L = 5287 R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 107, 211, 389, 197, 401, 137, 401, Frequency 36 21 1 0 25 11.07.2013 30 / 33
  • 56. Maximal order problem When does πC ,L decompose into cycles, all of whose (distinct) lengths are mutually coprime? Example π3,19 = (1, 7, 9, 3)(2, 13, 11, 16, 12, 4, 8, 15, 5, 14, 17, 18, 6) π5,27 = (1, 6, 7, 13, 19, 25, 5)(2, 12, 14, 24, 26, 11, 8, 18, 20, 4, 22, 16, 9, 23, 21, 10)(3, 17, 15) For C = 2, this never happens. R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 31 / 33
  • 57. Extension questions Both are due to David Austin (GVSU). Suppose C1 = C2 . Does the composition πC2 ,L ◦ πC1 ,L reduce to πC ,L for some C ? Partial answer: Not always. π3,9 ◦ π2,9 = (1, 6)(2, 3, 5, 8, 4) = πi,9 ∀i Extend the CTC idea to a 3-dimensional array. Is this cipher equivalent to a 2-dimensional columnar transposition? What if we used higher-dimensional arrays? R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 32 / 33
  • 58. Thank you R. Talbert (GVSU) Deconstructing CTCs 11.07.2013 33 / 33

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