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Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
Agile and Scrum Workshop
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Agile and Scrum Workshop

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These are the slides I have used for a workshop on agile software development and Scrum.

These are the slides I have used for a workshop on agile software development and Scrum.

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  • Lösung: Bis zu vier Metern erreichen. Das größte bekannte Exemplar war ein am 4. April 1978 im Damaraland (Namibia) erlegter Bulle, der 4,21 Meter groß und 10,39 Meter lang war Quelle: Wikipedia, http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elefanten

    Bildquellen:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/moe/1981942682
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/travel_aficionado/2200003879/
  • Transcript

    • 1. Saves the day. Agile and Scrum Workshop Agile & Scrum Rainer Stropek software architects gmbh http://www.timecockpit.com rainer@timecockpit.com @rstropek Workshop Web Mail Twitter
    • 2. Agile development – what’s different? Agenda Scrum basics – how does it work? Operational excellence – how to get the most our of Scrum? Discussion Open Space, interview Source: Flickr (Common Creative)Source: MSDN Source:Wikipedia Source: Flickr (Common Creative)
    • 3. Agenda  Session 1: Basics of Agile Development 08:00-09:15 Coffee break 09:15-09:30  Session 2: Scrum 09:30-11:00 Coffee break 11:00-11:15  Session 3: Operational Excellence With Scrum 11:15-12:30 Lunch 12:30-13:30  Session 4: Discussion, Interview 13:30-15:00
    • 4. Workshop  Please mute your phones and close mail apps We will pay attention to time management  breaks for phone calls and/or mails  Stay open for new approaches Scrum might be different to what you are used to  Make it interactive Ask questions, provide feedback Participate in the Open Space discussion in session 4
    • 5. Agile development – what’s different? Agenda Scrum basics – how does it work? Operational excellence – how to get the most our of Scrum? Discussion Open Space, interview Source: Flickr (Common Creative)Source: MSDN Source:Wikipedia Source: Flickr (Common Creative)
    • 6. Waterfall Model Traditional Process Agile and Scrum Workshop …or variants of it (e.g. V-Model); read more in Wikipedia Big Design Up Front Detailed Product Planning Requirements elicitation Software Design Carefully think through and design the end product. Testing Make sure that implemented product works how it was designed in product planning stage Documentation Reduce dependencies on certain people/teams Requirements Specification Design Design Document Implementation Product & Doc Testing Acceptance Maintenance Documentation
    • 7. Traditional Process  It is simple, logical, and easy to understand Before you build something, you have to know what to build  Save money by emphasizing up-font planning phase „Show me how you started your project and I can tell you how it will end“ Bugs found in early project stages are less costly to fix Goal: Predictable, repeatable process
    • 8. Traditional Process  Reduce risk by taking enough time to plan Predict features, quality, milestones, costs, etc. Well researched techniques for requirements elicitation and management including prototypes  Documentation is very important Specification might be part of a contract Get independent of people/teams Goal: Predictable, repeatable process
    • 9. Traditional Process  All good ideas must come at the beginning A great idea in a late process cycle becomes a threat  Written documentation only makes us feel safe It proves that we have worked hard, it preserves knowledge even if people change Will it be read? Is it complete? “It feels that we are spending more time writing documents than producing software”  “Aha” effect Best ideas often appear during first hands-on experiences Deliver what has been asked for (“written in stone”), not what is needed It seams logical - what’s wrong?
    • 10. Traditional Process  Times are changing Planning (or guessing) what the future will bring is hard, if not impossible Requirements often already change during (extensive) planning phase There is a cost in being able to repeat in a world that changes fast  It is not much fun for a team A rigid, change-resistant process destroys team work  “If it does not work, we just have to do it better!” It seams logical - what’s wrong?
    • 11. Stacey’s Agreement and Certainty Matrix Plan-driven Approach Agile and Scrum Workshop Read more… Needed for highly structured physical environments E.g. manufacturing, construction industries Might work for simple projects Predictive Fails for complicated projects Adaptive needed Prototyping might help Completely unsuitable for complex projects Research projects Experimental development Technology Close to certainty Far from certainty Requirements Far from agreement Close to agreement
    • 12. Targetting Economy of Scope Software Factory Custom Code Project A Custom Code Project B Base Class Library
    • 13. Targetting Economy of Scope Software Factory Custom Code Project A Custom Code Project B Base Class Library Common Components
    • 14. Targetting Economy of Scope Software Factory Custom Component Project A Project B Base Class Library Common Components Custom Component Custom Component Custom Component Model, Extensions, Configuration, Scripts Model, Extensions, Configuration, Scripts Patterns, Practices, Guidelines
    • 15. Software Factories Multiple implementations (=Copies) of the same design/product  Cost per unit of output generally decreasing with increasing scale as fixed costs are spread out over more units of output  Examples Manufacturing Software (e.g. shipping versions on DVDs) Economy of Scale Production of multiple designs and their initial implementations  Similar designs based on common techniques and technologies  Examples Construction industry (e.g. bridges, sky scrapers) Custom software in a specific domain Economy of Scope
    • 16. Traditional Process "There are two approaches, evolutionary and single step [waterfall], to full capability. An evolutionary approach is preferred. … [In this] approach, the ultimate capability delivered to the user is divided into two or more blocks, with increasing increments of capability... software development shall follow an iterative spiral development process in which continually expanding software versions are based on learning from earlier development.“ US Department of Defense, Acquisition Strategy Considerations, Source: Wikipedia Many organizations are turning away from waterfall
    • 17. Manifesto for Agile Software Development Basic Ideas Agile and Scrum Workshop We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value: • Individuals and interactions over processes and tools • Working software over comprehensive documentation • Customer collaboration over contract negotiation • Responding to change over following a plan That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more. Source: agilemanifesto.org (2001) Welcome changes Response flexible and fast Lightweight development methods Iterative and incremental development Self-organizing, cross- functional teams
    • 18. Iterative Approach in Agile Development Incremental Development Agile and Scrum Workshop Source: MSDN Adaptive Planning Time-boxed iterations E.g. Sprints in Scrum, Iterations in XP Regular interactions E.g. Business and development, team members
    • 19. Agile Principles  Early and continuous delivery of valuable software Frequent software delivery (weeks to a couple of months; the shorter the better) Working software is the primary measure of progress  Welcome changing requirements Changes are welcome for the customer's competitive advantage  Business people and developers work together daily Convey information preferably by face-to-face conversation Co-location is preferred
    • 20. Agile Principles  Build projects around motivated individuals Cross-functional, self-organizing team of typically 5-9 people Sustainable pace avoiding crunch-time and “death marches”  Technical excellence and good design enhance agility The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams  Simplicity is essential Maximize the amount of work that is not done This is what lean development is all about!
    • 21. Agile Principles  Regularly reflect on how to become more effective Truth in every communication Facilitate positive conflicts Read more at agilemanifesto.org
    • 22. Adaptive vs. Predictive Process Release Planning Agile and Scrum Workshop Iterative approach instead of big up front planning Very detailed plan about short-term work Shared across entire team Mid-term: Committed stories/features Regularly shared/revised with business Long-term: Strategic level, range of functionality Continuously revised throughout the project Time We know exactly what we are going to do next week We have an idea of where we are going to invest time in the following month We have a mission statement for the release in six months
    • 23. Lean/Agile Methods  Lean software development  Extreme Programming (XP)  Kanban  Scrum (more about this later)  …
    • 24. XP vs. Scrum Scrum XP Product owner Customer Scrum master XP coach Team Team Sprint Iteration Sprint planning meeting Planning game
    • 25. Kanban Kanban Core Values Agile and Scrum Workshop Source: E. Brechner: Too much of a good thing? Enter Kanban Visualize your work Immediately identify work that is waiting and will likely never be finished Limit Work in Progress Constrain work in progress to reduce cycle times
    • 26. Reduce „Waste“ with Lean  Overproduction Don‘t produce more than you need Too complex, too general, too extensible, … Solution: Frequently reprioritize work based on business value Image Source: Lacey M.: The Scrum Field Guide
    • 27. Reduce „Waste“ with Lean  Depth first instead of breadth first Spec, design, code, and test limited number of features completely before moving on Stay focused on producing value instead of infrastructure Fail early  Transportation Reduce waiting time between team members and teams E.g. build times, branching, incompatible office hours  Motion Know how you spend your time and reduce time used to find stuff E.g. bug tracking system instead of emails, source code repository
    • 28. Reduce „Waste“ with Lean  Over-processing Over-engineering, e.g. optimize code that is performing adequately TDD, SDD  Inventory Undelivered work, typical for breadth-first development You can’t deliver value, you can’t get feedback  Waiting Optimize the flow of features by having the right amount of PMs, Devs, and Testers E.g. Drum-Buffer-Rope concept of Theory of Constraints (TOC)
    • 29. Video: Lucy Candy Factory Remember The Agile Values? Agile and Scrum Workshop Source: YouTube Self-organizing, cross- functional team Sustainable pace avoiding crunch-time Truth in every communication
    • 30. Reduce „Waste“ with Lean  Defects Reduce the need for rework by e.g. TDD Detect architectural issues by doing depth-first development
    • 31. Limits/Problems of Agile  Primary Goal: Predictability, stability, and high assurance Can be based on a contract  Scales better to large projects with many participants  Covers a broad spectrum Used in contracted software development, addresses product line, organizational, and enterprise concerns that span multiple projects Plan-Driven Approach  Primary Goal: Rapid value and responsiveness to change Needs a dedicated, collocated customer  Works best for small to medium sized teams  Concentrates on a specific project Still need for high-level planning, syncing milestones across teams, cross-team scenario- focused engineering, … Agile Approach
    • 32. Limits/Problems of Agile  One-way, explicitly documented knowledge  Formally complete, consistent, traceable, and testable specifications  Architecture-based design Take advantage of software reuse e.g. across product lines Plan-Driven Approach  Frequent, person-to-person interaction  Adjustable, informal stories with frequent reprioritization and iterative refinement  Simple design Risk of costly “architecture breakers” Agile Approach
    • 33. Agile Myths  Myth #1: Agile = Scrum There are many agile methods, Scrum is one of them  Myth #2: In agile projects there is no planning „What XP teams find valuable is the collaboration, elicitation, and balancing of priorities in the planning act itself. The plans that result have a short half-life, not because they are bad plans, but because their underlying assumptions have a short half-life.” (Kent Beck, co-creator of XP)  Myth #3: Agile means no documentation Remember the agile manifesto: “while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more”. Essential documentation is still valuable for customers, partners, and cross-team dependencies
    • 34. Agile Myths  Myth #4: Agile means no up-front design Technical excellence and good design are key. However, value responding to change more than sticking to your original plan.
    • 35. Misconceptions and Realities Agile Myths Agile and Scrum Workshop Source: Boehm B., Turner R.: Balancing Agility and Discipline, Figure 2-3 YAGNI = You ain‘t gonna need it
    • 36. Dimensions Affecting Method Agile Myths Agile and Scrum Workshop Source: Boehm B., Turner R.: Balancing Agility and Discipline, Figure 2-2
    • 37. Saves the day. Agile and Scrum Workshop Q&A Rainer Stropek software architects gmbh rainer@timecockpit.com http://www.timecockpit.com @rstropek Thank your for coming! Mail Web Twitter
    • 38. Agile development – what’s different? Agenda Scrum basics – how does it work? Operational excellence – how to get the most our of Scrum? Discussion Open Space, interview Source: Flickr (Common Creative)Source: MSDN Source:Wikipedia Source: Flickr (Common Creative)
    • 39. What is Scrum?  Scrum is a framework for developing and sustaining complex products Including, but not limited to, software Read the Scrum Guide  Transparency Process must be visible to those responsible for the outcome Common understanding of what is being seen (e.g. what means “done”?)  Inspection Frequently inspect Scrum artifacts and progress  Adaption Process or the material being processed might need adjustment Source: Flickr (Common Creative)
    • 40. The Team  Product Owner Customer or customer representative Responsible for maximizing the value of the product and the work of the team Manages the Product Backlog  Development Team Self-organizing, cross-functional, without hierarchy Typically three to nine people  Scrum Master Responsible for ensuring Scrum is understood and enacted Servant-leader for the Scrum Team Building a team of people instead of using a pool of resources
    • 41. The Team  A dedicated person Can represent a committee  The only one who manages the product backlog Based on the company’s vision or roadmap Can delegate the work, but is still accountable  Clarifies the requirements for the development team  This is a very demanding job! Product Owner  A dedicated person If possible, don’t mix roles for a single person  Builds and maintains the team Like a coach  Coordination, collecting status E.g. manage daily standup meeting  Provide balance against the Product Owner Support and protection of the team Scrum Master
    • 42. The Events – Sprint  Time-box (One month or less) during which a “Done”, useable, and potentially releasable product increment is created  Constant sprint goal Quality goals also must not be changed  Scope may be clarified and re- negotiated  In extreme cases cancel the entire sprint
    • 43. Sprint Planning Tools Tools Agile and Scrum Workshop Whiteboard or software? Whiteboard Software support for backlog management Easier to use if not collocated
    • 44. Agile and Scrum Workshop Work item management integrated with source control, build, and test Team Foundation Server/Services
    • 45. Agile and Scrum Workshop Project management Atlassian Jira
    • 46. Agile and Scrum Workshop Project management Rally
    • 47. The Events – Sprint Planning  Time-boxed Typically eight hours for a one-month sprint  Two parts What will be done in the sprint? How will it be done?  Input: Ordered Product Backlog Derive Sprint Backlog based on the team’s velocity  Output: Sprint Backlog User Stories Task for short-term stories
    • 48. The Events – Daily Scrum  15 Minutes, Time-box Synchronize, plan next 24 hours  Goals Improve communications Identify and remove impediments Highlight and promote quick decision-making Improve the Dev’s level of project knowledge  Questions to ask What did you do yesterday? What will you do today? What blocking issues do you have? What is your confidence (1-10) that the team will accomplish the goal of this sprint?
    • 49. The Events – Sprint Review  Time-boxed Typically four hours for a one-month sprint  Demo the work in an environment as close to production as possible Build trust by constantly showing a high-quality product  Review Product Backlog
    • 50. The Events – Retrospective  Time-boxed Typically three hours for a one-month sprint  Opportunity for process improvement How do we work together? What works? What does not work?
    • 51. Product Backlog  The single source of requirements for any changes to the product Remember YAGNI?  Constantly evolves as the product and the environment in which it will be used evolves  Ordered by value, risk, priority, and necessity Higher ordered Product Backlog items are clearer and more detailed The lower the order, the less detailed  Product Backlog grooming Product Owner and the Development Team collaborate on the details of Product Backlog items Can consume up to 10% of the Development Team’s time
    • 52. Agile and Scrum Workshop Source: http://www.mitchlacey.com Scrum Framework Flow Diagram
    • 53. Definition of „Done“ „Done“ Checklist Agile and Scrum Workshop Source: Lacey M., How Do We Know When We Are Done? Shared understanding of what it means for work to be complete Definition of “Done” will expand to include more stringent criteria for higher quality over time
    • 54. Saves the day. Agile and Scrum Workshop Q&A Rainer Stropek software architects gmbh rainer@timecockpit.com http://www.timecockpit.com @rstropek Thank your for coming! Mail Web Twitter
    • 55. Agile development – what’s different? Agenda Scrum basics – how does it work? Operational excellence – how to get the most our of Scrum? Discussion Open Space, interview Source: Flickr (Common Creative)Source: MSDN Source:Wikipedia Source: Flickr (Common Creative)
    • 56. Engineering Practices Goal Tool Shared Code Ownership Static Code Analysis (e.g. Style Cop, Code Analysis) Framework Design Guidelines Documentation (e.g. Sandcastle) Automated Tests Test Driven Development Automated Unit Tests (e.g. MS Test, MS Fakes) Automated Integration and Acceptance Tests
    • 57. Engineering Practices Goal Tool Pair Programming, Code Review Automated Code Review Process (e.g. Team Foundation Server) Refactoring Editor Tools in the IDE (e.g. Visual Studio, Re-Sharper) Continuous Integration Frequent Check-Ins Automated build, branching strategy (e.g. Team Foundation Server) Enhance Quality Gated check-in (e.g. Team Foundation Server)
    • 58. Engineering Practices  Build Engineering into Product Backlog Product owner must understand and be willing to make the long-term investment  Work on your “Done” checklist E.g. code must be checked-in on main branch (gated check-in)  If necessary, care for appropriate training
    • 59. Effort Estimation and Scrum Principles Agile and Scrum Workshop How long does it take to build something more-or-less unknown? Use story points to express relative complexity Try to learn about the team‘s velocity „Done“ story points per sprint If necessary use a small reference story for velocity prediction Constantly track project‘s progress User Stories „As a […] I want to […] so that […]“ Estimation Remaining work in hours Story Points „T-Shirt Sizing“ Use a XS story as a reference
    • 60. Burndown Chart Monitor Progress Agile and Scrum Workshop Source: Lacey M.: The Scrum Field Guide Burndown chart not a mandatory artifact in Scrum Still popular in many Scrum teams
    • 61. Story Decomposition What‘s a Story? Agile and Scrum Workshop Source: Lacey M.: The Scrum Field Guide Epics Importance of grooming Describes the smallest action that a user would typically want to do, or it is the smallest piece of functionality with business value Tasks should be completed in no more than two days
    • 62. How large is an elephant? Fermi Method Agile and Scrum Workshop Estimation Making justified guesses about quantities that seem impossible to compute given limited available information “How many piano tuners are there in Chicago?” 3-4m, largest one was 4.21m large and 10.39m long (Source: Wikipedia)
    • 63. Calculate circumference of the earth What to measure and/or plan? Agile and Scrum Workshop Eratosthenes (ca. 276-194 B.C.), read more in Wikipedia Plan/measure what‘s import instead of what‘s easy Constantly monitor and update your plan
    • 64. Release planning Planning the Unknown Agile and Scrum Workshop Source: Lacey M.: The Scrum Field Guide Inputs An estimated, ordered, and prioritized product backlog The team velocity A sprint timeline
    • 65. Add a Degree of Confidence  „We estimate that we will finish the project within two months“  “Management wants to launch the product before Christmas. We estimate that we can finish the project until then. Our goal is to are committed to finishing
    • 66. Add a Degree of Confidence  Our estimation is that the project… …will be finished in <= two months (75%) …will take us between two and three months (15%) …will take us more than three months (10%)  Use story points, velocity, sprint schedule, and confidence intervals for release planning and risk management
    • 67. Estimation How good are you? Agile and Scrum Workshop How good do you estimate? Estimate width (“between … and …”) of an Airbus A380 with a confidence interval of 90% Estimate the height (“between … and …”)Width of an Airbus A380? Wheel of fortune where 9 of 10 fields win
    • 68. A house as high as an Airbus A380 is a „Hochhaus“ in Germany Source: Airbus
    • 69. Frage Kleinste Schätzung Größte Schätzung Richtig? 1938 hat eine Englische Dampflokomotive einen Geschwindigkeitsrekord aufgestellt. Wie schnell war sie (in km/h)? In welchem Jahr hat Newton seine Gravitationsgesetze („Mathematische Prinzipien der Naturphilosophie“) veröffentlicht? Wie breit (inch) ist eine typische Visitenkarte in den USA? In welchem Jahr wurde das Internet als militärische Kommunikationsinfrastruktur eingeführt (damals als „Arpanet“ bezeichnet)? In welchem Jahr kam Wiliam Shakespeare zur Welt? Wieviele KM Luftlinie liegen zwischen New York und Los Angeles? Wieviel Prozent eines Rechtecks werden durch einen Kreis mit gleicher Breite abgedeckt? Wie alt war Charlie Chaplin als er starb? Wie hoch ist die Oberflächentemperator der Sonne (in Grad Celsius)? Wie groß ist die Fläche des Kontinents Asien (in km²)? Summe der erreichten Punkte
    • 70. Frage Antwort 1938 hat eine Englische Dampflokomotive einen Geschwindigkeitsrekord aufgestellt. Wie schnell war sie (in km/h)? 202 km/h In welchem Jahr hat Newton seine Gravitationsgesetze („Mathematische Prinzipien der Naturphilosophie“) veröffentlicht? 1685 Wie breit (inch) ist eine typische Visitenkarte in den USA? 3.5 In welchem Jahr wurde das Internet als militärische Kommunikationsinfrastruktur eingeführt (damals als „Arpanet“ bezeichnet)? 1969 In welchem Jahr kam Wiliam Shakespeare zur Welt? 1564 Wieviele KM Luftlinie liegen zwischen New York und Los Angeles? 2.451 Wieviel Prozent eines Rechtecks werden durch einen Kreis mit gleicher Breite abgedeckt? 78,5% Wie alt war Charlie Chaplin als er starb? 88 Wie hoch ist die Oberflächentemperator der Sonne (in Grad Celsius)? 6.000°C Wie groß ist die Fläche des Kontinents Asien (in km²)? 44,39 Mio. km²
    • 71. A 90% confidence interval is more a 30% interval Cognitive Bias Agile and Scrum Workshop Source: McConnell et al: Aufwandsschätzung bei Softwareprojekten You have to train your ability to estimate
    • 72. Estimating Costs Hubbard’s Rule of Five Agile and Scrum Workshop How to estimate when agile? There is about 93% probability that the median (and mean) of the entire population is between the highest and the lowest values of a sample of five Prerequisite: Gaussian distribution Source: Hubbard D.: How To Measure Anything Average Probability of an estimation being on this side of the bell curve? Probability that a second estimation is also on this side of the bell curve? Probability that five estimations in a row are on this side of the bell curve? 50% 50% * 50% = 25% 50% * 50% * 50% * 50% * 50% = 3,125% Estimation
    • 73. Estimating Costs Statistics Agile and Scrum Workshop How to estimate when agile? Statistics can be dangerous OperationalCosts/RGU[€] Natural minimum Endless potential for e.g. unforeseen problems
    • 74. Mediokristan Extremistan Sources:http://www.flickr.com/photos/akc77/3370167184/, http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/337323578/ UnderCreativeCommonsLicense
    • 75. Black Swan Black Swan Agile and Scrum Workshop http://www.flickr.com/photos/essjay/224318029/ Under Creative Commons License You cannot predict the future exactly Small: Heisenberg Big: Complexity We do not live in the asymptote, we live in the real life We tend to believe in statistics Look for positive black swans Source: Taleb N.: The Black Swan
    • 76. Saves the day. Agile and Scrum Workshop Q&A Rainer Stropek software architects gmbh rainer@timecockpit.com http://www.timecockpit.com @rstropek Thank your for coming! Mail Web Twitter
    • 77. Agile development – what’s different? Agenda Scrum basics – how does it work? Operational excellence – how to get the most our of Scrum? Discussion Open Space, interview Source: Flickr (Common Creative)Source: MSDN Source:Wikipedia Source: Flickr (Common Creative)
    • 78. Saves the day. Agile and Scrum Workshop Q&A Rainer Stropek software architects gmbh rainer@timecockpit.com http://www.timecockpit.com @rstropek Thank your for coming! Mail Web Twitter

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