• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Collaboration and Technology - ALI-ABA 2012
 

Collaboration and Technology - ALI-ABA 2012

on

  • 496 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
496
Views on SlideShare
496
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • The Dakota War of 1862, also known as the Sioux Uprising, (and the Dakota Uprising, the Sioux Outbreak of 1862, theDakota Conflict, the U.S.–Dakota War of 1862 or Little Crow's War) was an armed conflict between the United States and several bands of the eastern Sioux. It began on August 17, 1862, along the Minnesota River in southwest Minnesota. It ended with a mass execution of 38 Dakota men on December 26, 1862, in Mankato, Minnesota.Throughout the late 1850s, treaty violations by the United States and late or unfair annuity payments by Indian agents caused increasing hunger and hardship among the Dakota. Traders with the Dakota previously had demanded that the government give the annuity payments directly to them (introducing the possibility of unfair dealing between the agents and the traders to the exclusion of the Dakota). In mid-1862 the Dakota demanded the annuities directly from their agent, Thomas J. Galbraith. The traders refused to provide any more supplies on credit under those conditions, and negotiations reached an impasse.[2]On August 17, 1862, one young Dakota with a hunting party of three others killed five settlers while on a hunting expedition. That night a council of Dakota decided to attack settlements throughout the Minnesota River valley to try to drive whites out of the area. There has never been an official report on the number of settlers killed, although as many as over 800 settlers have been cited and is not out of line. Further consideration is given to maybe just as many settlers being taken captive as slaves, if not tortured to death as was customary.[citation needed]Over the next several months, continued battles between the Dakota against settlers and later, the United States Army, ended with the surrender of most of the Dakota bands.[3] By late December 1862, soldiers had taken captive more than a thousand Dakota, who were interned in jails in Minnesota. After trials and sentencing, 38 Dakota were hanged on December 26, 1862, in the largest one-day execution in American history. In April 1863 the rest of the Dakota were expelled from Minnesota toNebraska and South Dakota. The United States Congress abolished their reservations.
  • The Dakota War of 1862, also known as the Sioux Uprising, (and the Dakota Uprising, the Sioux Outbreak of 1862, theDakota Conflict, the U.S.–Dakota War of 1862 or Little Crow's War) was an armed conflict between the United States and several bands of the eastern Sioux. It began on August 17, 1862, along the Minnesota River in southwest Minnesota. It ended with a mass execution of 38 Dakota men on December 26, 1862, in Mankato, Minnesota.Throughout the late 1850s, treaty violations by the United States and late or unfair annuity payments by Indian agents caused increasing hunger and hardship among the Dakota. Traders with the Dakota previously had demanded that the government give the annuity payments directly to them (introducing the possibility of unfair dealing between the agents and the traders to the exclusion of the Dakota). In mid-1862 the Dakota demanded the annuities directly from their agent, Thomas J. Galbraith. The traders refused to provide any more supplies on credit under those conditions, and negotiations reached an impasse.[2]On August 17, 1862, one young Dakota with a hunting party of three others killed five settlers while on a hunting expedition. That night a council of Dakota decided to attack settlements throughout the Minnesota River valley to try to drive whites out of the area. There has never been an official report on the number of settlers killed, although as many as over 800 settlers have been cited and is not out of line. Further consideration is given to maybe just as many settlers being taken captive as slaves, if not tortured to death as was customary.[citation needed]Over the next several months, continued battles between the Dakota against settlers and later, the United States Army, ended with the surrender of most of the Dakota bands.[3] By late December 1862, soldiers had taken captive more than a thousand Dakota, who were interned in jails in Minnesota. After trials and sentencing, 38 Dakota were hanged on December 26, 1862, in the largest one-day execution in American history. In April 1863 the rest of the Dakota were expelled from Minnesota toNebraska and South Dakota. The United States Congress abolished their reservations.
  • The Dakota War of 1862, also known as the Sioux Uprising, (and the Dakota Uprising, the Sioux Outbreak of 1862, theDakota Conflict, the U.S.–Dakota War of 1862 or Little Crow's War) was an armed conflict between the United States and several bands of the eastern Sioux. It began on August 17, 1862, along the Minnesota River in southwest Minnesota. It ended with a mass execution of 38 Dakota men on December 26, 1862, in Mankato, Minnesota.Throughout the late 1850s, treaty violations by the United States and late or unfair annuity payments by Indian agents caused increasing hunger and hardship among the Dakota. Traders with the Dakota previously had demanded that the government give the annuity payments directly to them (introducing the possibility of unfair dealing between the agents and the traders to the exclusion of the Dakota). In mid-1862 the Dakota demanded the annuities directly from their agent, Thomas J. Galbraith. The traders refused to provide any more supplies on credit under those conditions, and negotiations reached an impasse.[2]On August 17, 1862, one young Dakota with a hunting party of three others killed five settlers while on a hunting expedition. That night a council of Dakota decided to attack settlements throughout the Minnesota River valley to try to drive whites out of the area. There has never been an official report on the number of settlers killed, although as many as over 800 settlers have been cited and is not out of line. Further consideration is given to maybe just as many settlers being taken captive as slaves, if not tortured to death as was customary.[citation needed]Over the next several months, continued battles between the Dakota against settlers and later, the United States Army, ended with the surrender of most of the Dakota bands.[3] By late December 1862, soldiers had taken captive more than a thousand Dakota, who were interned in jails in Minnesota. After trials and sentencing, 38 Dakota were hanged on December 26, 1862, in the largest one-day execution in American history. In April 1863 the rest of the Dakota were expelled from Minnesota toNebraska and South Dakota. The United States Congress abolished their reservations.

Collaboration and Technology - ALI-ABA 2012 Collaboration and Technology - ALI-ABA 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • TECHNOLOGY &COLLABORATIONAT THE INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART ROBERT STEIN Deputy Director for Research, Technology, and Engagement Indianapolis Museum of Art
  • After April 19…ROBERT STEINDeputy DirectorDallas Museum of Art
  • OPEN AND COLLABORATIVE
  • Credit Flickr ~scotttboone
  • GOALSsimple and beautifulEASY AND CLEAN READINGEXPERIENCE
  • GOALSan audience of scholarsBUILD CONFIDENCE –ENCOURAGE CITATION
  • GOALSmulti-platformREAD ANYWHERE
  • Flickr Credit ~timtom
  • Our Basic Approach FEEDS CONTENT USER EXPERIENCEMANAGEMENT HTML5 / CSS3 & IN DRUPAL JAVASCRIPT
  • Many Books on Same WebsitePossibly different requirements per catalogue(i.e. style, interaction, content model, etc…)
  • OSCI ReaderUser Experience Tailored for Scholars and Citable Content
  • Credit Flickr ~timtom
  • Multiple Layouts (no pages)
  • LAYOUT IS COMPUTEDUSINGFont SizeLine HeightBrowser Size
  • • We’ve tested this on all size screens – Iphone – Flatpanels 1,2,3, 4, column – 3-screen – Tiled display wall
  • PDF / ePub Support– Support static catalogues via PDF / ePub– Fixed versions of interactives– Fixed layout based on page size– Endnotes instead of inline footnotes/figures
  • http://OSCIToolkit.org
  • SAY HELLO TOTAP
  • 3 Goals for Mobile Content Management1. Make Authoring Easy2. Target Reuse3. Leverage Core Systems Flickr Credit ~williamhook
  • Balboa Park Online Collaborative
  • MFA Boston
  • Gemeente Museum Den Haag
  • Winona State University
  • Crystal BridgesMuseum of American Art
  • TAP/TourML CollaboratorsMuseums• Balboa Park Online • National Air and Space Collaborative Museum• Dallas Museum of Art • National Museum of the• The Eiteljorg Museum of American Indian Native American and Western • The Art Institute of Chicago Art Vendors• Indianapolis Museum of Art • AdLib Systems • GuideByCell• The Metropolitan Museum of • Imagineear Art • MyTours• Minnesota Historical Society • NOUS Guides• Museum of Contemporary • Tristan Systems Art, San Diego• Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
  • THE BUILDING BLOCKSOF TAP
  • Flickr Credit ~brainfarts TAP ROADMAP
  • • Create easy ways to author mobile content• Finalize the TourML Specification• Create Mobile User-Interfaces• Create a validation tools for TourML• Integrate with third-party tools• Test tools with museum content collaborators TAP ROADMAP
  • SPEAKING OF ROADMAPS
  • http://TAPintoMuseums.org
  • THANK YOU!QUESTIONS? ROBERT STEIN Deputy Director for Research, Technology, and Engagement Indianapolis Museum of Art