How Agile Are You
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

How Agile Are You

on

  • 954 views

How Agile Are You

How Agile Are You

Statistics

Views

Total Views
954
Views on SlideShare
954
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

How Agile Are You How Agile Are You Presentation Transcript

  • How Agile Are You? For more information: www.Agile101.net Complete the following fields: Question Yes/No Total The team is empowered to make decisions. Yes 0 The team is self-organising and does not rely on management to set and meet its goals. No 0 The team commits and takes responsibility for delivery and is prepared to help with any task that helps the team to achieve its goal. 0 The team knows who the product owner is. How Agile Are You? Each sprint/iteration has a clear goal. All team members, including testers, are included in requirements workshops. Requirements documentation is barely sufficient and the team collaborates to clarify details as features are ready for development. Test cases are written up-front with the requirements/user story. There is a product backlog/feature list prioritised by business value. The product backlog has estimates created by the team. The team knows what their velocity is. Velocity is used to gauge how many user stories should be included in each sprint/iteration. Yes No Sprints/iterations are timeboxed to four weeks or less. Sprint budget is calculated to determine how many product backlog items/features can be included in the sprint/iteration. The sprint/iteration ends on the agreed end date. All tasks on the sprint backlog are broken down to a size that is less than one day. Requirements are expressed as user stories and written on a card. The team estimates using points which indicate the relative size of each feature on the product backlog/feature list. The team generates burndown charts to track progress daily. Software is tested and working at the end of each sprint/iteration. The team is not disrupted during the sprint/iteration. Changes are integrated throughout the sprint/iteration. Automated unit testing is implemented where appropriate. You are #DIV/0! Agile! There is an automated build and regression test. Stretch tasks are identified for inclusion in the sprint/iteration if it goes better than expected. The Product Owner is actively involved throughout each sprint. All code changes are reversible and it is possible to make a release at any time. Testing is integrated throughout the lifecycle and starts on delivery of the first feature. Impediments that hold up progress are raised, recorded on the whiteboard and resolved in a timely fashion. When someone says 'done', they mean DONE! (ie shippable). The team uses the whiteboard to provide clear visibility of progress and issues on a daily basis. The sprint/iteration goal(s) is clearly visible on the board. All user stories and tasks are displayed on the whiteboard for the duration of the sprint/iteration. Daily scrums happen at the same time every day – even if the scrum master isn’t present. The daily scrum is resticted to answering the standard 3 scrum questions and lasts no more than 15 minutes. There is a product demonstration/sprint review meeting at the end of each sprint/iteration. All team members, including testers and Product Owner, are included in the sprint/iteration review. The sprint/iteration review is attended by executive stakeholders. There is a sprint retrospective at the end of each sprint/iteration. Key metrics are reviewed and captured during each sprint retrospective. All team members, including testers, are included in the sprint retrospective meeting. Actions from the sprint retrospective have a positive impact on the next sprint/iteration. © 2009 - Agile101.net
  • How Agile Are You? For more information: www.Agile101.net Collate the responses from each team member and copy/paste them into this sheet - one set of responses per column starting in B:B>> This spreadsheet can collate results for up to 24 team members. To add a new team member, press Ctrl+Shift+A Question Total "Yes" % "Yes" The team is empowered to make decisions. 0 0% The team is self-organising and does not rely on management to set and meet its goals. 0 0% The team commits and takes responsibility for delivery and is prepared to help with any task that helps the team to achieve its goal. 0 0% The team knows who the product owner is. 0 0% Each sprint/iteration has a clear goal. 0 0% All team members, including testers, are included in requirements workshops. 0 0% Requirements documentation is barely sufficient and the team collaborates to clarify details as features are ready for development. 0 0% Test cases are written up-front with the requirements/user story. 0 0% There is a product backlog/feature list prioritised by business value. 0 0% The product backlog has estimates created by the team. 0 0% The team knows what their velocity is. 0 0% Velocity is used to gauge how many user stories should be included in each sprint/iteration. 0 0% Sprints/iterations are timeboxed to four weeks or less. 0 0% Sprint budget is calculated to determine how many product backlog items/features can be included in the sprint/iteration. 0 0% The sprint/iteration ends on the agreed end date. 0 0% All tasks on the sprint backlog are broken down to a size that is less than one day. 0 0% Requirements are expressed as user stories and written on a card. 0 0% The team estimates using points which indicate the relative size of each feature on the product backlog/feature list. 0 0% The team generates burndown charts to track progress daily. 0 0% Software is tested and working at the end of each sprint/iteration. 0 0% The team is not disrupted during the sprint/iteration. 0 0% Changes are integrated throughout the sprint/iteration. 0 0% Automated unit testing is implemented where appropriate. 0 0% There is an automated build and regression test. 0 0% Stretch tasks are identified for inclusion in the sprint/iteration if it goes better than expected. 0 0% The Product Owner is actively involved throughout each sprint. 0 0% All code changes are reversible and it is possible to make a release at any time. 0 0% Testing is integrated throughout the lifecycle and starts on delivery of the first feature. 0 0% Impediments that hold up progress are raised, recorded on the whiteboard and resolved in a timely fashion. 0 0% When someone says 'done', they mean DONE! (ie shippable). 0 0% The team uses the whiteboard to provide clear visibility of progress and issues on a daily basis. 0 0% The sprint/iteration goal(s) is clearly visible on the board. 0 0% All user stories and tasks are displayed on the whiteboard for the duration of the sprint/iteration. 0 0% Daily scrums happen at the same time every day – even if the scrum master isn’t present. 0 0% The daily scrum is resticted to answering the standard 3 scrum questions and lasts no more than 15 minutes. 0 0% There is a product demonstration/sprint review meeting at the end of each sprint/iteration. 0 0% All team members, including testers and Product Owner, are included in the sprint/iteration review. 0 0% The sprint/iteration review is attended by executive stakeholders. 0 0% There is a sprint retrospective at the end of each sprint/iteration. 0 0% Key metrics are reviewed and captured during each sprint retrospective. 0 0% All team members, including testers, are included in the sprint retrospective meeting. 0 0% Actions from the sprint retrospective have a positive impact on the next sprint/iteration. 0 0% 1 Your Team is 0% Agile! © 2009 Agile101.net
  • How Agile Are You? For more information: www.Agile101.net 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% The team knows who the product owner is. The product backlog has estimates created by the team. The team is empowered to make decisions. Requirements documentation is barely sufficient and the team collaborates to clarify details as features are ready for development. 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Sprints/iterations are timeboxed to four weeks or less. Requirements are expressed as user stories and written on a card. The team is not disrupted during the sprint/iteration. The team knows what their velocity is. The sprint/iteration ends on the agreed end date. The team generates burndown charts to track progress daily. © 2009 Agile101.net View slide
  • 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% There is an automated build and regression test. Testing is integrated throughout the lifecycle and starts on delivery of the first feature. Changes are integrated throughout the sprint/iteration. The Product Owner is actively involved throughout each sprint. When someone says 'done', they mean DONE! (ie shippable). 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% The daily scrum is resticted to answering the standard 3 scrum questions and lasts no more than 15 minutes. All team members, including testers, are included in the sprint retrospective meeting. The sprint/iteration goal(s) is clearly visible on the board. The sprint/iteration review is attended by executive stakeholders. © 2009 Agile101.net View slide