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Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity
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Film as Entertainment, Art, and Commodity

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This PowerPoint presentation is used in my Introduction to Film class in conjunction with Chapter One of Bordwell and Thompson's Film Art: An Introduction.

This PowerPoint presentation is used in my Introduction to Film class in conjunction with Chapter One of Bordwell and Thompson's Film Art: An Introduction.

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Transcript

  • 1. HOW MOVIES GET MADE: THE BUSINESS SIDE OF FILMMAKING THFM 1610: Introduction to Film Dr. Rosalind Sibielski, Bowling Green State University
  • 2. THE BUSINESS OF FILMMAKING  Commercial filmmaking is a for-profit endeavor  Economic considerations are a key factor in decisions concerning which films get financing & which films get made  Industrial concerns have just as much influence on how films are made as the artistic concerns of the filmmakers
  • 3. THE FILM INDUSTRY Production = Movie is made Distribution = What format & in what venues movie will be seen by audiences, as well as how it will get to those venues Exhibition = Movie is shown to audiences *production, distribution, and exhibition are the three branches of the film industry
  • 4. PROPOSED MOVIE PROJECT: REMAKE OF BARTHOLOMEW'S SONG (2006)  Original Film = DIY Mode of Production  written, directed, & edited by Destin Cretton & Lowell Frank  cast = 6 actors (2 of whom were also crew members)  crew = 6 (+ 1 producer)  budget = $2,500.00  shot entirely on location at CSU Campus Operations Building
  • 5. MODES OF PRODUCTION  Large-Scale Production  $225 million (same as Man of Steel)  Independent Production  $70 million  Django Unchained had a budget of $100 million, while Silver Linings Playbook was made for around $21 million  Small-Scale Production  $2.5 million (same as Beasts of the Southern Wild)  Exploitation Film  $3 million (Same as Paranormal Activity2)
  • 6. SCRIPTWRITING & FUNDING
  • 7. PRODUCT PLACEMENT  Products used by characters within scene http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjB6r-HDDI0  Filmmakers receive production money from advertisers to feature their products in the film  Visual placement within scene  Verbal reference within scene
  • 8. CO-PROMOTION https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPjnqoD91x0  Companies provide production money in exchange for cross- promotional use of characters and/or scenes from the movie in advertising for their own products
  • 9. MERCHANDISING  Companies purchase the licensing rights to the characters and/or title of your film, which they then use in the manufacturing of a range of consumer goods
  • 10. CASTING & HIRING CREW Steven Spielberg Steven Soderberg Brandon Cronenberg Drew Goddard Leonardo DiCaprio James Franco Jonny Lee Miller Tahmoh Penikett
  • 11. SHOOTING A MOVIE Filming on a sound stage  Example: Inception Filming on location  Example: The Hunger Games Filming in front of a green screen  Example: The Avengers
  • 12. THEATRICAL DISTRIBUTION MODELS Platforming Wide Release Limited Release Non-Theatrical Release
  • 13. ANCILLARY MARKETS  foreign theatrical distribution  video-on-demand  cable TV premium movie channels  cable TV stations that play movies as part of their programming schedules  cable TV networks that feature small-budget independent films  home video  legal digital downloads and streaming services  film festivals  free video sharing sites
  • 14. ADVERTAINMENT  Movies that are made to advertise a product/service or publicize a corporation  Often marketed as products in and of themselves, with ad campaigns for the advertisements  The Internet has provided a platform for this kind of publicity, although it is not limited just to content featured on Web sites
  • 15. FOUR STORIES PROMO
  • 16. THE MIRROR BETWEEN US  Written & Directed by Kahlil Joseph
  • 17. EUGENE  Director: Spencer Susser  Screenwriter: Adam Blampied
  • 18. ¡EL TONTO!  Director: Lake Bell  Screenwriter: Ben Sayeg
  • 19. MODERN/LOVE  Director: Lee Toland Krieger  Screenwriter: Amy Jacobowitz

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