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9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs
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9.03.08.Power Of Pl Cs

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This PowerPoint was used on the Wednesday, September 3, 2008 training. The PLC roll out began in August, 2008.

This PowerPoint was used on the Wednesday, September 3, 2008 training. The PLC roll out began in August, 2008.

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  • Forming-ice breaker, circle of trust
  • You should begin each meeting with a review of the team norms
  • Fostering trust: what can I do to foster trust: be present, be open, listen: with empathy, without judgement, seek understanding, view learning as mutual, honor the person, honor the process Ask open questions-pay attention to syntax, intonation, presuppositions Respond with SPACE-silence, paraphasing, accepting without judgement, clarifying and elaborating Reframe: apply new frames to wident viewpoints Dialog-engage in conversations that deepen understanding--read trust poem, engage in stone activity
  • Prevents attacks and rebuttals
  • Add link to “Portfolio of Student Work: Focus on Research Standard”
  • Framing clarifying questions—cool versus frosty Role of facilitator is critical.
  • Facilitator must check to see if the group has responded to the presenter’s focus questions, monitors time, keeps one or two people from dominating the discussion,protects presenter, leads debriefing. Presenter prepares: copies, amount of context necessary, focusing question(s), how much time needed for participants to examine work, may also alter other times BUT no step skipped. Explain why/how you chose this work Explain the context: Assignment What came before Parameters (drafts, group work, help) Provide a focusing question(s)
  • Importance of sticking to time limits and order At first will feel artificial and restrictive. Can adjust time periods as necessary (less of presentation, more for clarifying questions)
  • Tuning protocols work best when participants and presenters think of their work as a collaboration to help students learn. Facilitator must monitor the warm and cool feedback and be ready to step in to get a rephrasing or to redirect the comment.
  • Accessible during 15 min. time allotment Copies of written material
  • How did the protocol compare with what you expected?—to presenter Frustrations, misunderstandings, as well as positive reactions--participants
  • Show video of tuning protocol in action.
  • Transcript

    • 1. A Journey Worth Taking Work of the DuFours PLC Training September 3, 2008
    • 2. Conceptual Framework
      • A solid foundation of collaboratively developed and widely shared mission, vision, values and goals.
      • Collaborative teams who work interdependently to achieve common goals linked to the purpose of learning for all.
      • A commitment to continuous improvement and a constant focus on results.
    • 3. Shift in Focus
      • A Shift in the Work of Teachers
      • From isolation…to collaboration
      • From each teacher clarifying what students must learn…to collaborative teams building shared knowledge and understanding about essential learning.
      • From each teacher assigning priority to different learning standards…to collaborative teams establishing the priority of respective learning standards.
      • From each teacher determining the pacing of the curriculum …to collaborative teams of teachers agreeing on common pacing.
    • 4. A Shift in the Work of Teachers
      • From individual teachers attempting to discover ways to improve results…to collaborative teams of teachers helping each other to improve.
      • From privatization of practice…to open sharing of practice
      • From decisions made on the basis of individual preferences…to decisions made collectively by building shared knowledge of best practice.
      • From “collaboration lite” on matters unrelated to student to student achievement…to collaboration explicitly focused on issues and questions that most impact student achievement.
      • From an assumption that these are “my kids, those are your kids”…to an assumption that these are “our kids.”
    • 5. Collaboration or Coblaboration?
      • Collaboration--This is how we do business..
      • Polarities-Autonomy vs. Collaboration
    • 6. Protocols for Reflective Dialog
    • 7. Phases of group development Forming Storming Norming Performing
    • 8. Reflective Practice can be considered
      • “ The practice or act of analyzing our actions, decisions, or products by focusing on our process of achieving them.” (Killion & Todnem)
      • “ Deliberate thinking about action, with a view on improvement.” (Loughran)
      • “ The practice of periodically stepping back to ponder the meaning of what has recently transpired...probing to a deeper level than the trail and error experience.” (Raelin)
    • 9. Experience Learning Reflection
    • 10. Why engage in reflective practice?
        • Reflective practice increases learning at the individual and organizational level so that educational practice continuously improves and student learning is enhanced.
        • Adults learn, retain, and use what they perceive is relevant to their professional needs Professional Development for All in Inclusive Schools
    • 11. No one prepares you for the path: some stones are slippery.
    • 12. Conditions for Powerful Reflection
      • Trust
      • Be present
      • Be open
      • Listen: with empathy, without judgement
      • Seek understanding
      • View Learning as mutual
      • Honor the person & the process
    • 13.
      • Team norms: Protocols or commitments developed by each team to guide members in working together. Norms help team members clarify expectations regarding how they will work together to achieve shared goals.
    • 14. Theory of action for reflective practice Pause Openness Inquiry Thinking Learning Enhanced Student Learning Action Reflective Practice to Improve Schools, 2006 Corwin Press
    • 15. Banner Questions
      • Add to the list of banner questions.
    • 16. Phases of group development Forming Storming Norming Performing
    • 17. Expanding thought & inquiry
      • Ask open questions: intonation, syntax, presupposition
      • Respond with SPACE: silence [ SILENCE IS SOMETIMES THE ANSWER] , paraphasing, accepting, clarifying & elaborating
      • Reframe: Apply new frames to widen views
      • Dialog: Engage in conversations that deepen understanding
    • 18. Reflective Writing Protocol Describe from your experience…
      • What is it we expect students to learn?
      • How will we know when they have learned it?
      • How will we respond when they do not learn?
      • How will we respond when they already know it?
    • 19. What is a tuning protocol?
      • Facilitated, focused conversation
      • Formal structure of steps and guidelines
      • Case study
      • Collegial experience
      • A tool to help “tune”
        • our practice
    • 20. A Definition
      • A tuning protocol is a “way a teacher presents actual work before a group of thoughtful ‘critical friends’ in a structured reflective discourse aimed at ‘tuning’ the work to higher standards.”
        • Joe McDonald in “Three Pictures of an Exhibition (1995)
    • 21. When is a tuning protocol used?
      • Answer questions about student performance
      • Inform instruction and assessment
      • Explore efficacy of programs, initiatives
      • Helps identify effective teaching strategies
      • Promotes reflective practice
    • 22. Why does it work?
      • Risk-free way to get at what makes a difference in learning
      • Problem-solving approach
      • Presenters feel good, learn
      • Work receives serious consideration
      • Participants learn
      • Process stimulates a learning community
    • 23. What a tuning protocol is NOT!
      • Opportunity for “one-upmanship”
      • Showcase for validation
      • Haven for venting about students, parents, administrators, instruction in earlier grades
    • 24. The Pedigree
      • Harvard Project Zero
      • Coalition of Essential Schools
      • --Joe McDonald, Brown University, 1995
      • Academy for Educational Development
      • “ There is emerging evidence that some versions of looking at student work yield benefits for teaching and learning.”
          • --Little, Gearhart, Curry, and Kafka (2003)
    • 25. One School’s Story
      • Research initiative at the high school
      • Use of the tuning protocol
      • Contributions of the tuning protocol
    • 26. Feedback from Teachers
      • “ To me, the value of this process is learning from other teachers their strategies for improving a lesson.” “…useful and helpful.”
      • “ Most of our group participated enthusiastically in all steps of the protocol.”
      • “ During the discussion, people brainstormed, productively building on their colleagues’ comments.”
      • “ On the whole, this was a very positive experience.” “Well worth the time.”
    • 27. The warts
      • “ A couple of the group members appeared shy about participating.”
      • “ The group seemed tentative at first…”
      • “… this activity puts us in a vulnerable role.”
      • “ The protocol feels contrived.”
      • “ The presenter got a lot of feedback about what was wrong but had hoped for more feedback about how to achieve the specific goals he expressed.”
    • 28. The protocol
      • Who?
      • Groups of 8-11
        • Facilitator
        • Presenter
        • Participants
    • 29. The procedure
      • Presentation (15 min.)
      • Clarifying Questions (5 min.)
      • Individual Note-taking (5 min.)
      • Participant Discussion (15 min.)
        • Warm and Cool Feedback
      • Presenter Reflection (15 min.)
      • Debriefing (10 min.)
    • 30. Guidelines
      • Respect the presenter.
      • Watch time.
        • Don’t skip the debriefing segment.
      • Keep groups stable.
      • Contribute to substantive discourse
        • Give both warm and cool feedback.
        • More “cool,” please
    • 31. Warm and Cool Feedback
      • Assumptions
      • #1 We all want to get better in the work we do.
      • #2 We all want to be courteous.
      • #3 In order to accomplish #1, we need to be thoughtful, insightful, and provocative.
      • #4 We are in this together
    • 32. Warm Feedback
      • Statements that let the presenter know what is working.
        • Praise for what is effective
        • Specific
          • “That’s great!” =X
          • “Good job!” =X
    • 33. Cool Feedback
      • Statements or questions that help the presenter move forward.
        • What if? I wonder what would happen if…
      • Not criticism---critique
        • Improve the work
        • Improve the context
        • Not about the presenter
        • No “should” or Why didn’t you?”
    • 34. What can be tuned
      • Any written form
      • Performance or demonstration on audiotape or videotape
      • Artwork
      • Computer multi-media presentation
      • Display
    • 35. Selection criteria
      • One piece for one student
      • One piece from several students
      • Multiple pieces from the same students
      • Drafts of a single piece from a single student
      • One that represents best or worst or middle
      • A randomly chosen piece
    • 36. Focusing Questions
      • What does this work tell us about what students know and are able to do?
      • Is this piece good enough for students in 6 th grade? How can we help this student (and all students) make it good enough?
      • How could the instruction that surrounds this work execute a better product?
    • 37. Importance of Debriefing
      • GOAL—Are teachers learning about their students and their practice?
      • Presenter discusses how the protocol worked
      • Participants discuss how the protocol worked
      • Sample reflection questions:
        • What did we learn about student research?
        • What did we learn about the protocol and ourselves?
        • Did we actually focus on student work or on other issues?
        • How could our process be improved?
    • 38. Quotes
      • “ The ability to collaborate—on both a large and small scale—is one of the core requisites of post modern society.” Fullan
      • “ The most promising strategy for sustained, substantive school improvement is developing the ability of school personnel to function as professional learning communities.” DuFour & Eaker
      • The most crucial questions educators can ask themselves are ‘What do we truly believe about our selves and our students?” and “Do our practices match our beliefs?”
      • The moment teachers begin to closely examine their lessons and the results of those lessons, instruction improves and competence increases.
      • “ Sometimes we forget that the purpose—the real agenda—of a team meeting is not to cover a set of topics, but more importantly to continuously generate solutions to instructional problems in order to get better results.” Mike Schmoker from Results Fieldbook , 2001
    • 39. Quotes
      • “ The ability to collaborate—on both a large and small scale—is one of the core requisites of post modern society.” Fullan
      • “ The most promising strategy for sustained, substantive school improvement is developing the ability of school personnel to function as professional learning communities.” DuFour & Eaker
      • The most crucial questions educators can ask themselves are ‘What do we truly believe about our selves and our students?” and “Do our practices match our beliefs?”
      • The moment teachers begin to closely examine their lessons and the results of those lessons, instruction improves and competence increases.
      • “ Sometimes we forget that the purpose—the real agenda—of a team meeting is not to cover a set of topics, but more importantly to continuously generate solutions to instructional problems in order to get better results.” Mike Schmoker from Results Fieldbook , 2001
    • 40. Works Cited
      • Easton, Lois. Collaboratively Examining Student Work: Why and How . Oct.2, 2003.
      • Little, Judith Warren,et al. “Looking at Student Work For Teacher Learning, Teacher Community, and School Reform. Phi Delta Kappan . November 2003.
    • 41. The world is round and the place that may seem like the end may also only be the beginning. Ivy baker priest
    • 42. Whirlwinds Can Get in the Way of Finding Time to Collaborate

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