A Journey Worth Taking Fundamentals of Professional Learning MAKING THE CASE & DOING THE WORK August 17 and 18, 2009 Rosem...
Objectives <ul><li>Participants will: </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a clear understanding of the NJ Teaching Standards, the Pr...
Who’s in the room? Two Lies and A Truth <ul><li>On an index card write two lies and one truth about yourself.  We will sha...
Hopes & Fears
Accessing Prior Knowledge Thinking Circle Map PLCs
August 17 & 18, 2009 Definition of Professional Development <ul><li>Congress has the opportunity to promote significant im...
National Staff Development Council  www.nsdc.org New Jersey Staff Development Council  www.NJstaffdevelopment.org   <ul><l...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Professional Development Standards for NJ Educators <ul><li>Context – where learning occurs </li></ul...
Professional Development Standards for New Jersey Educators  Process 4. Data Driven 5. Research-based 6. Evaluation 7. Des...
N   S    D  C From the Editor: Enabling teachers to meet together routinely does not make them a professional learning ...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Standards as a Learning Tool <ul><li>Read your assigned standard. </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss the ratio...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Teach us a Standard <ul><li>Key Points/Descriptors </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul>...
Ideas-Teacher Needs-What is Valued  1.3 <ul><li>Think about your school. Place a check next to statements that describe th...
August 17 & 18, 2009 “ Teachers  rate learning from other teachers second only to their own experiences as the most valuab...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Professional Learning Communities <ul><li>Professionals in a school are coming together  </li></ul><u...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Evolution of a Professional Learning Community <ul><li>Single teachers, individual classrooms which l...
August 17 & 18, 2009 “ Continuous improvement is unlikely to occur in the absence of professional communities that change ...
August 17 & 18, 2009 The Research on PLCs <ul><li>A shared purpose about the changes and improvements on which they will w...
BEFORE LUNCH Watch Video Fill out survey  THINK ABOUT YOUR PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
AFTER LUNCH Teaming
August 17 & 18, 2009
August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>Decades ago Judith Little found that most  team talk floats high above the level of implement...
August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>Almost 20 years later the ,  the situation hasn’t changed .  Little and her colleagues found ...
Factory Model: Focus on Procedures Rather Than Results
August 17 & 18, 2009 Teams are the Core <ul><li>Teams do the work of a Professional learning Community.  </li></ul><ul><li...
August 17 & 18, 2009 The most promising strategy for sustained, substantive school improvement is developing the ability f...
August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>A successful face-to-face team is more than just collectively intelligent.  It makes everyone...
August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>True teamwork entails a regular schedule of formal meetings where teachers focus on the detai...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Seven Keys to Effective Teams <ul><li>Collaboration embedded in effective practice </li></ul><ul><li>...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Four Corners:  An exercise in understanding preferences in group work Structure Action Caring Vision-...
August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>Move to the corner that best represents the element most important to you initially as a grou...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Types of Work for Teams <ul><li>Study groups </li></ul><ul><li>Examining student/teacher work </li></...
Day 2-August 18, 2009 <ul><li>Sharing Englewood’s Journey-Abraham Alarcon </li></ul><ul><li>Norms, Concensus  </li></ul><u...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Norms or Ground Rules <ul><li>Standards of behavior by which we all agree to operate while we are in ...
August 17 & 18, 2009
August 17 & 18, 2009 Norms <ul><li>Allow groups to build trust by actually doing substantive work together </li></ul><ul><...
Arriving at Consensus <ul><li>All points of view have been heard. </li></ul><ul><li>The will of the group is evident even ...
Fist to Five <ul><li>5 Fingers-I love this proposal. I will champion it. </li></ul><ul><li>4 Fingers-I strongly agree with...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team
Conflict or Conversation?
Responsive Turns <ul><li>Interrupt an encounter to change its momentum </li></ul><ul><li>Name an encounter to make its nat...
Diffusing Strategies “ Speaking of Tom, when does basketball season start this year.” Moving the conversation in a differe...
August 17 & 18, 2009 True or False <ul><li>Conflict is always a matter of right vs. wrong. </li></ul><ul><li>Conflicts are...
Listening Concepts <ul><li>Misconceptions </li></ul><ul><li>Attentiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Self-awarenes </li></ul><ul><l...
Listening Strategies <ul><li>Develop inner silence </li></ul><ul><li>Listening for what contradicts our assumptions </li><...
Listening: Experimental Learning <ul><li>Protocol:  </li></ul><ul><li>Find a partner. </li></ul><ul><li>Take turns explain...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Some Definitions of Conflict <ul><li>Conflict is… </li></ul><ul><li>Destructive conflict is… </li></u...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Ideal Conflict  Point Artificial  Harmony Mean-Spirited Personal attacks Constructive Destructive CON...
August 17 & 18, 2009
August 17 & 18, 2009
August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>Facing a problem is no guarantee that you will solve it, bit not facing it is a guarantee tha...
August 17 & 18, 2009 The Nature of Conflict <ul><li>Conflict is  natural  –  neither negative or positive, it just is. </l...
August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>Focus 90% of your time on solutions and only 10% of your time on problems. </li></ul><ul><ul>...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Conflict Resolution Strategies <ul><li>Fierce Conversations </li></ul><ul><li>The Consultancy Protoco...
August 17 & 18, 2009 What are Protocols? <ul><li>Agreed upon guidelines for a conversation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Everyone ...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Why Protocols?  <ul><li>Structure makes it safe to ask challenging questions </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure...
Consultancy Protocol
August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>The point is not to do the protocol well, but  to have in-depth, insightful conversations abo...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Develop a team plan employing a “Powerful Design” Protocol <ul><li>With your team review the selected...
August 17 & 18, 2009 The use of protocols encourages an environment for learning that presumes the social construction of ...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Exploring Problem Solving Processes  using a Jigsaw Strategy <ul><li>Collecting information/data </li...
August 17 & 18, 2009 The Importance of Celebrating Success <ul><li>Sends a vivid message about what is important </li></ul...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Celebration brainstorming <ul><li>Think about stopping occasionally to congratulate each other for a ...
August 17 & 18, 2009 REFLECTION  3-2-1 <ul><li>What are three priorities you have for enhancing your professional developm...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Make an individual plan for a team or committee for which you are a member  <ul><li>How could your te...
Transforming Professional Development <ul><li>From: ACTIVITY DRIVEN </li></ul><ul><li>Consensus of Opinions </li></ul><ul>...
August 17 & 18, 2009 N   S    D  C SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT LEADERSHIP PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CURRICULU...
Will Collaboration Work? 1.4 <ul><li>This  </li></ul>
August 17 & 18, 2009 Decades Strategies Activity <ul><li>Each group is to reflect on life in a decade. </li></ul><ul><li>W...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Reflections <ul><li>What ideas stand out most in your mind about how life has changed over the decade...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Your Opinion <ul><li>What are the ten major reasons our schools must change? </li></ul><ul><li>What a...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Your Opinion Turn to Your Elbow Partner <ul><li>What are the ten major reasons our schools must chang...
Collaboration <ul><li>Why should we collaborate? </li></ul><ul><li>What questions should guide our collaboration? </li></u...
Skillful Collaboration: <ul><li>Problem Solving Skills </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Defining the problem </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Team builders <ul><li>Builds trust </li></ul><ul><li>Acceptance of differences </li></ul><ul><li>Surf...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Evolution of a Professional Learning Community <ul><li>Single teachers, individual classrooms which l...
August 17 & 18, 2009 The Seven Norms of Collaborative Work <ul><li>Pausing  </li></ul><ul><li>Paraphrasing  </li></ul><ul>...
Adult Relationships in Schools <ul><li>Parallel Play </li></ul><ul><li>Adversarial </li></ul><ul><li>Congenial </li></ul><...
Collegiality Survey <ul><li>A.  We TALK openly with one another about practice. </li></ul><ul><li>B.  We OBSERVE one anoth...
Collegiality comes when the school leaders: <ul><li>Clearly  State  expectations for collegiality </li></ul><ul><li>Model ...
Shift in Focus <ul><li>A Shift in the Work of Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>From isolation…to collaboration </li></ul><ul><li...
What Does Research Say? <ul><li>Text As Expert-EFFECTIVE TEACHING MATTERS-reading </li></ul><ul><li>Jigsaw Protocol </li><...
Questions to Guide Reading <ul><li>Why do we need to continually improve and adapt our instruction? </li></ul><ul><li>Why ...
Until Next Week Thank you for allowing us to learn together.
Protocols for Reflective Dialog
Phases of group development Forming Storming Norming Performing
After Using Tool 1 What do I know/What do we know? Reflection 1.1 <ul><li>Reflect: What value did working with a group add...
Reflective Practice can be considered <ul><li>“ The practice or act of analyzing our actions, decisions, or products by fo...
Experience Learning Reflection
Why engage in reflective practice? <ul><ul><li>Reflective practice increases learning at the individual and organizational...
No one prepares you for the path: some stones are slippery.
Conditions for Powerful Reflection <ul><li>Trust </li></ul><ul><li>Be present </li></ul><ul><li>Be open </li></ul><ul><li>...
<ul><li>Team norms: Protocols or commitments developed by each team to guide members in working together. Norms help team ...
Theory of action for reflective practice Pause Openness Inquiry Thinking Learning Enhanced Student Learning Action Reflect...
Banner Questions <ul><li>Add to the list of banner questions. </li></ul>
Phases of group development Forming Storming Norming Performing
Expanding thought & inquiry <ul><li>Ask open questions: intonation, syntax, presupposition </li></ul><ul><li>Respond with ...
Reflective Writing Protocol   Describe from your experience… <ul><li>What is it we expect students to learn? </li></ul><ul...
Effective Teaching Matters By Anne Jolly <ul><li>You will work in groups of four. </li></ul><ul><li>Each person will read ...
What is a tuning protocol? <ul><li>Facilitated, focused conversation </li></ul><ul><li>Formal structure of steps and guide...
A Definition <ul><li>A tuning protocol is a “way a teacher presents actual work before a group of thoughtful ‘critical fri...
When is a tuning protocol used? <ul><li>Answer questions about student performance </li></ul><ul><li>Inform instruction an...
Why does it work? <ul><li>Risk-free way to get at what makes a difference in learning </li></ul><ul><li>Problem-solving ap...
What a tuning protocol is NOT! <ul><li>Opportunity for “one-upmanship” </li></ul><ul><li>Showcase for validation </li></ul...
The Pedigree <ul><li>Harvard Project Zero </li></ul><ul><li>Coalition of Essential Schools </li></ul><ul><li>--Joe McDonal...
One School’s Story <ul><li>Research initiative at the high school </li></ul><ul><li>Use of the tuning protocol </li></ul><...
Feedback from Teachers <ul><li>“ To me, the value of this process is learning from other teachers their strategies for imp...
The warts <ul><li>“ A couple of the group members appeared shy about participating.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ The group seemed ...
The protocol <ul><li>Who?  </li></ul><ul><li>Groups of 8-11 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Facilitator </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>P...
The procedure <ul><li>Presentation (15 min.) </li></ul><ul><li>Clarifying Questions (5 min.) </li></ul><ul><li>Individual ...
Guidelines <ul><li>Respect the presenter. </li></ul><ul><li>Watch time.  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t skip the debriefing s...
August 17 & 18, 2009 Warm and Cool Feedback <ul><li>Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>#1 We all want to get better in the work...
Warm Feedback <ul><li>Statements that let the presenter know what is working. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Praise for what is eff...
Cool Feedback <ul><li>Statements or questions that help the presenter move forward. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What if?  I wond...
August 17 & 18, 2009 What can be tuned <ul><li>Any written form </li></ul><ul><li>Performance or demonstration on audiotap...
Selection criteria <ul><li>One piece for one student </li></ul><ul><li>One piece from several students </li></ul><ul><li>M...
Focusing Questions <ul><li>What does this work tell us about what students know and are able to do? </li></ul><ul><li>Is t...
Importance of Debriefing <ul><li>GOAL—Are teachers learning about their students and their practice? </li></ul><ul><li>Pre...
Quotes <ul><li>“ The ability to collaborate—on both a large and small scale—is one of the core requisites of post modern s...
Quotes <ul><li>“ The ability to collaborate—on both a large and small scale—is one of the core requisites of post modern s...
Works Cited <ul><li>Easton, Lois.  Collaboratively Examining Student Work: Why and How . Oct.2, 2003. </li></ul><ul><li>Li...
The world is round and the place that may seem like the end may also only be the beginning. Ivy baker priest
Whirlwinds Can Get in the Way of Finding Time to Collaborate
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8.17.18.09 A Journey Worth Taking Eng

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This PowerPoint was used on the Monday, Tuesday, August 17, 18, 2009 training. The PLC roll out began in August, 2008.

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  • Beginning-Context review-WHAT WE PLAN TO WORK ON AND WHY, HOW WE CAME TO BE HERE, WHAT WE HOPE TO ACHIEVE, AND HOW LONG AND IN WHAT WAYS WE PLAN TO WORK TOGETHER. SETTLING ON THE NORMS
  • I can start with one fear is that I won’t get essential points across and one hope is that by Tuesday afternoon everyone will be better equipped to do the work of the PLC.
  • Circle Map with Frame of Reference The Circle Map is used for brainstorming ideas and for showing prior knowledge about a topic by providing context information. Everything you know about PLCs, How you know it and how you learned it-What are your expectations for today and tomorrow?
  • Report offers the most comprehensive picture and far reaching analysis of professional learning that has ever been conducted in the us Congress has the opportunity to promote significant improvement in teaching quality in American schools by supporting legislation that will amend the definition of Professional Development in NCLB to align it to research and successful practice.
  • Handouts: Leader Standards, Teacher Standards &amp; PD Standards Context Standards –the school culture for professional learning-Must be created intentionally Process Standards-Professional learning strategies that help adults learn address how the system organizes learning opportunities to ensure adults acquire the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to affect student learning To be truly helpful, professional development must be based on the kind of research and practices described in the standards. Content Standards address what educators must understand and be able to ensure students learn successfully NJ’s CCCS identify the essential kowledge and skills expected and guaranteed for students in NJ schools. These provide a unifying direction for educators and leaders. There is now an alignment among pd, school leadership and Three sets of standards: Professional Teaching Standards, Professional Leadership Standards and Professional Development Standards
  • Groups of three-Count off by 3’s.Assign standard-prepare either oral or visual-10 minutes
  • After Tool 1.2 Use Tool 1.3 Place dots on chart after filling out chart list ideas in slide 5 Reasons to work in learning teams: sense of urgency; collegial support; method of mentoring; way of implementing schoolwide initiatives; relevance and value; RELEVANCE-consider shifting aspects of of our world-diveristy of schools is rapidly increasing--40% percent of public school children come from minority groups-both opportunities and challenges as a result REFERENCE WORK FROM RESULTS NOW
  • These questions direct the members attention to the core purpose of the community’s work – intentional professional learning for the purpose of improved student learning The communities of professionals study multiple sources of data to see where students are succeeding in their learning and where they are performing poorly. Poor student performance in an area suggests that the professionals should undertake alternative approaches to teaching students in the identified area. This information drives the work of the community.
  • Shirley M. Hord Evolution of the Professional Learning community JSD Summer 2008 2 nd bullet – schools scheduled grade level and dept. meetings frequently led to work on managerial issues: ordering books, scheduling trips, good use of shared resources, conference reports – Many schools today use this pattern to describe PLC 3 rd bullet – as teachers met, sharing success and failures with team colleagues they began to wk together on instructional strategies and programs and plcs were characterized as places to work collaboratively and some learning occurs from collaborative work although as a by product with the teams work being the focus of attention 4 th bullet- another shift standards – identifying what students were expected to achieve and significantly, what teachers were responsible to teach so that students reached the standards. Professionals can no longer rely on yesterdays schooling practice T and A need opportunities for intentional learning preparing them to enable students to reach HIGH standards. Today&apos;s schools are expected to be successful with a diverse population which requires a broad spectrum of curriculum, instruction and assessment approaches. Research and exemplary practices inform school adm. And T about more effective ways of developing students into successful readers, mathematicians, writers and scientists
  • The goal for our continued work together is to be able to lead and provide professinally inclusive and energizing rather than administratively intrusive and exhausting data driven improvement which will lead to greater empowerment and effectiveness
  • Purpose – shared vision, mission and goals that the staff see as their common purpose Leadership – sharing power, authority, and decision making. “ Teachers broaden their perspectives, develop a higher level of professionalism, and deepen their effectiveness. “ Principal becomes the sharing P – developing the leadership potential of staff Support – Time and place as well as relational/human capacities include the development of positive attitudes, respect, trust, - build that capitol. Collective intentional learning and its applications the staffs decision on what to learn is based on deep exploration of student data to identify the needs of students and the reflection on the extent to which the staff’s work is producing the results intended. The identified student learning areas provide the target for the staff’s intentional learning. Staff study student needs to make decisions about the adoption of new practices/programs and accept the need for their own learning to employ the knew knowledge and practices effectively. Reflection/discussion/ assessment/ and new considerations. Shared personal Practice peer coaching, coaching What are you learning, why are you learning that/, how are you learning it/
  • Linda
  • Professor at the Graduate school of education at U of California, Berkley. Research isntersts center on organizational and occupational contexts of teaching with special attention to teachers’ collegial relationships and to the contexts, policies and practices of teachers’ PD.
  • Use quote from Results Now-pgs 24 and 25 JUST LEAVE ME ALONE AND LET ME TEACH
  • Follow with Blue Angels DVD
  • If you look at page 2 slide 2 and this slide on page 4 what do you notice?
  • Essential elements of group work Common goal Actions/tasks to be accomplished Indicators of accomplishment Person responsible Timeline Needed resources
  • Pick a person, any person
  • “ Because every group has unspoken norms for behavior, groups need to work at being explicit about what they expect from each other – Get those assumptions on the table . Micro Lab for setting norms. Two ways to write norms – Best at beginning of teams work – Observing and writing sdown the norms that already exist 2. group members make suggestins. MUST PUBLICIZE Post an celebrate them Enforcing the Norms If you don’t cal attention to a norm that has been violated in effect you’re creating a second set of norms ex on time Fun ideas to hadle violated norms Besket of nerf balls small colored card or flags or hankies waved whaen a violation was noted All responsible Evaluate the norms How well did we do on this norm
  • Linda
  • Anne Jolly Tools 4.3-4.7 Forming ground rules protocol
  • Pg. 165 DuFour-Usually thought of as: All of us can embrace the proposal All of us can endorse the proposal All of us can live with the proposal All of us can agree not to sabotage the proposal
  • If the vote is too close it does not move forward.
  • Form triads-one person speaks-at some point someone interrupts-use strategy to change conversation
  • Count off by threes. One person mid-strem throws in a “conversation stopper”.Someone in the group Diffuses using one of the above strategies.
  • Time heals all wounds if they atr treated first – Conflict must be resolved with human contact
  • Jim Knight
  • Use consultancy protocol-30 minutes
  • R - the presenter has the opportunity not only to reflection and describe an issue, dilemma but also to have interesting questions asked of him AND to gain differing perspectives and new insights. Protocols build space for listening and often give people a license to listen, without having to respond. In schools many people say time is of the essence and time is one resource that no one seems to have enough of. Protocols are a way to make the most of the time we have. Have you ever been to a meeting where you have a burning issue you want to discuss and what happens is everyone “dumps” his issue and feeds off of each other, but you walk away from the meeting dissatisfied not really having anything new of significance that will help you with your issue? A protocol guards against this.
  • Read over the Processes Tool which describes the use of protocols. Select one of the Facilitation Strategies with your team described need or one of the identified scenarios Complete a Powerful Designs plan and present it to the group
  • If school improvement is the umbrella for improving student achievement, then the handle and central tubing (the core support) is effective professional learning that focuses on the enhancing the learning of adults in order to increase student achievement – student success in life. None of the _______can be fully successful without sustained and supported professional learning opportunities that build the capacity of the “community” to improve, to change,
  • Provide each team with chart paper and markers. Give each team one card. (even among teams) After brainstorming, ask teams to have one member report on team’s ideas. List Desing Inc. ideas and Sabotage Inc.s ideas. ASK TEACHERS TO REFER TO THE CHARTS &amp; DISCUSS HOW THEIR CURRENT SCHOOL CULTURE FACILITATES OR HINDERS THE SUCCESS OF LEARNING TEAMS. Vary the share out depending on the size of the group..List the items needed in the ppt presentation. DAY TWO-compile and distribute a single list of teachers’ ideas for making collaboration work. Work
  • Shirley M. Hord Evolution of the Professional Learning community JSD Summer 2008 2 nd bullet – schools scheduled grade level and dept. meetings frequently led to work on managerial issues: ordering books, scheduling trips, good use of shared resources, conference reports – Many schools today use this pattern to describe PLC 3 rd bullet – as teachers met, sharing success and failures with team colleagues they began to wk together on instructional strategies and programs and plcs were characterized as places to work collaboratively and some learning occurs from collaborative work although as a by product with the teams work being the focus of attention 4 th bullet- another shift standards – identifying what students were expected to achieve and significantly, what teachers were responsible to teach so that students reached the standards. Professionals can no longer rely on yesterdays schooling practice T and A need opportunities for intentional learning preparing them to enable students to reach HIGH standards. Today&apos;s schools are expected to be successful with a diverse population which requires a broad spectrum of curriculum, instruction and assessment approaches. Research and exemplary practices inform school adm. And T about more effective ways of developing students into successful readers, mathematicians, writers and scientists
  • Pausing: Pausing before responding or asking a question, allows time for thinking and enhances dialogue, discussion and decision-making. Paraphrasing: Using a paraphrase starter that is comfortable for you: “So…” or “As you are…” or “You’re thinking…” and following the starter with a paraphrase assists members of the group to hear and understand each other as they formulate decisions. Probing: Using Gentle open-ended probes or inquiries such as, “Please say more…” or “I’m curious about…” or “I’d like to hear more about…” or “Then, are you saying…?” increases the clarity and precision of the group’s thinking. Putting ideas on the table: Ideas are the heart of a meaningful dialogue. Label the intention of your comments. For example, you might say, “Here is one idea…” or “One thought I have is…” or “Here is a possible approach…” Paying attention to self and others: Meaningful dialogue is facilitated when each group member is conscious of self and of others and is aware of not only what she/Me is saying, but also how it is said and how others are responding. This includes paying attention to learning style when planning for, facilitating, and participating in group meetings. Responding to others in their own language forms is one manifestation of this norm. Presuming positive intentions: Assuming that others’ intentions are positive promotes and facilitates meaningful dialogue and eliminates unintentional put-downs. Using positive intentions in your speech is one manifestation of this norm. Pursuing a balance between advocacy and inquiry: Pursuing and maintaining a balance between advocating a position and inquiring about one’s own and others’ positions, assists the group to become a learning organization
  • Consultant PS teacher ,principal, Harvard Grad School of Education Improving Schools From Within. School Leadership, school improvement from within, the personal and pofessional development of educators
  • Forming-ice breaker, circle of trust
  • You should begin each meeting with a review of the team norms
  • Fostering trust: what can I do to foster trust: be present, be open, listen: with empathy, without judgement, seek understanding, view learning as mutual, honor the person, honor the process Ask open questions-pay attention to syntax, intonation, presuppositions Respond with SPACE-silence, paraphasing, accepting without judgement, clarifying and elaborating Reframe: apply new frames to wident viewpoints Dialog-engage in conversations that deepen understanding--read trust poem, engage in stone activity
  • Prevents attacks and rebuttals
  • Add link to “Portfolio of Student Work: Focus on Research Standard”
  • Framing clarifying questions—cool versus frosty Role of facilitator is critical.
  • Facilitator must check to see if the group has responded to the presenter’s focus questions, monitors time, keeps one or two people from dominating the discussion,protects presenter, leads debriefing. Presenter prepares: copies, amount of context necessary, focusing question(s), how much time needed for participants to examine work, may also alter other times BUT no step skipped. Explain why/how you chose this work Explain the context: Assignment What came before Parameters (drafts, group work, help) Provide a focusing question(s)
  • Importance of sticking to time limits and order At first will feel artificial and restrictive. Can adjust time periods as necessary (less of presentation, more for clarifying questions)
  • Tuning protocols work best when participants and presenters think of their work as a collaboration to help students learn. Facilitator must monitor the warm and cool feedback and be ready to step in to get a rephrasing or to redirect the comment.
  • Accessible during 15 min. time allotment Copies of written material
  • How did the protocol compare with what you expected?—to presenter Frustrations, misunderstandings, as well as positive reactions--participants
  • Show video of tuning protocol in action.
  • 8.17.18.09 A Journey Worth Taking Eng

    1. 1. A Journey Worth Taking Fundamentals of Professional Learning MAKING THE CASE & DOING THE WORK August 17 and 18, 2009 Rosemary Seitel Englewood Public Schools
    2. 2. Objectives <ul><li>Participants will: </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a clear understanding of the NJ Teaching Standards, the Professional Development Standards for Teachers and the National Staff Development Council’s definition of professional learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Increase knowledge of school based change initiatives leading to increased student learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Gain clarity of collaborative Professional Learning Communities. </li></ul><ul><li>Use a variety of job-embedded professional development protocols. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a plan to share your knowledge of skillful collaboration. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Who’s in the room? Two Lies and A Truth <ul><li>On an index card write two lies and one truth about yourself. We will share out in a circle. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Hopes & Fears
    5. 5. Accessing Prior Knowledge Thinking Circle Map PLCs
    6. 6. August 17 & 18, 2009 Definition of Professional Development <ul><li>Congress has the opportunity to promote significant improvement in teaching quality in American schools by supporting legislation that will amend the definition of Professional Development in NCLB to align it to research and successful practice. </li></ul>
    7. 7. National Staff Development Council www.nsdc.org New Jersey Staff Development Council www.NJstaffdevelopment.org <ul><li>NSDC is committed to every educator engaging in effective professional learning everyday so that every student achieves </li></ul><ul><li>A new definition </li></ul><ul><li>PD definition in action </li></ul><ul><li>www.nj.gov/educator/profdev/pd/teacher </li></ul>
    8. 8. August 17 & 18, 2009 Professional Development Standards for NJ Educators <ul><li>Context – where learning occurs </li></ul><ul><li>Process - how the system organizes learning opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Content – What educators must understand </li></ul>To be truly helpful, professional development must be based on the kind of research and practices described in the standards.
    9. 9. Professional Development Standards for New Jersey Educators Process 4. Data Driven 5. Research-based 6. Evaluation 7. Design 8. Learning 9. Collaboration Content 10. Equity 11. Quality Teaching 12. Family Involvement Context <ul><li>Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Communities </li></ul>2. Leadership 3. Resources
    10. 10. N  S  D  C From the Editor: Enabling teachers to meet together routinely does not make them a professional learning community. Becoming a professional learning community requires intention , a focus on learning , a focus on results , a commitment to collegiality , an a willingness to reshape the school’s culture . Tracy Crow, JSD, Summer 2008
    11. 11. August 17 & 18, 2009 Standards as a Learning Tool <ul><li>Read your assigned standard. </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss the rationale with your group. </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare a presentation on the standard. </li></ul><ul><li>Your group will present your visual and oral presentation to the large group. </li></ul><ul><li>During presentations record key points and recommended uses in your note taking guide. </li></ul>
    12. 12. August 17 & 18, 2009 Teach us a Standard <ul><li>Key Points/Descriptors </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul>Visual
    13. 13. Ideas-Teacher Needs-What is Valued 1.3 <ul><li>Think about your school. Place a check next to statements that describe the needs of your school. </li></ul><ul><li>Use RED (1), BLUE (2) & YELLOW (3) dots to identify the top three needs </li></ul>
    14. 14. August 17 & 18, 2009 “ Teachers rate learning from other teachers second only to their own experiences as the most valuable source of information about effective teaching.” - Smylie, 1989
    15. 15. August 17 & 18, 2009 Professional Learning Communities <ul><li>Professionals in a school are coming together </li></ul><ul><li>As a group, in community </li></ul><ul><li>For the purpose of learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What are you learning? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why are you learning that? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How are you learning? </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. August 17 & 18, 2009 Evolution of a Professional Learning Community <ul><li>Single teachers, individual classrooms which led to teaching what they knew of curriculum and instruction </li></ul><ul><li>1980s, team teaching, open classrooms which led to increase in teacher morale and motivation </li></ul><ul><li>More recently, teacher as collaborator which has led to a focus on the team’s work </li></ul><ul><li>Most recently, standards and student achievement which has led to educators as learners </li></ul>
    17. 17. August 17 & 18, 2009 “ Continuous improvement is unlikely to occur in the absence of professional communities that change the way in which teachers and administrators work together to meet the needs of students.” Louis, K.S. (2008) Sustaining Professional Learning Communities . Thousand Oakes, CA: Corwin Press
    18. 18. August 17 & 18, 2009 The Research on PLCs <ul><li>A shared purpose about the changes and improvements on which they will work for the increased learning of students </li></ul><ul><li>Shared and supportive leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Supportive conditions, both structural and relational </li></ul><ul><li>Collective intentional learning and its application </li></ul><ul><li>Shared personal practice </li></ul>
    19. 19. BEFORE LUNCH Watch Video Fill out survey THINK ABOUT YOUR PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
    20. 20. AFTER LUNCH Teaming
    21. 21. August 17 & 18, 2009
    22. 22. August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>Decades ago Judith Little found that most team talk floats high above the level of implementation : “distant from the real work in and of the classroom”,… “ most teams serve to confirm present practice without evaluating its worth”. </li></ul><ul><li>In other words, without using short term assessment results as the basis for improvement. </li></ul>
    23. 23. August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>Almost 20 years later the , the situation hasn’t changed . Little and her colleagues found that teams continue to discuss “ wide ranging issues ” instead of looking closely and analytically at teaching and at how their teaching effects learning on an ongoing basis. They found that the typical behaviors of non-interference, privacy and harmony still prevails at the expense of improved instruction (Little 2003). </li></ul>
    24. 24. Factory Model: Focus on Procedures Rather Than Results
    25. 25. August 17 & 18, 2009 Teams are the Core <ul><li>Teams do the work of a Professional learning Community. </li></ul><ul><li>Well planned team decision –making is the key to success for improving academic achievement. </li></ul>
    26. 26. August 17 & 18, 2009 The most promising strategy for sustained, substantive school improvement is developing the ability for school personnel to function as professional learning communities. - Du Four & Eaker, 1998
    27. 27. August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>A successful face-to-face team is more than just collectively intelligent. It makes everyone work harder, think harder, think smarter and reach better conclusions than they would have on their own. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>James Surowiecki, As mentioned in Results Now: How we can Achieve Unprecedented Improvements in Teaching and Learning </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    28. 28. August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>True teamwork entails a regular schedule of formal meetings where teachers focus on the details of their lessons and adjust them on the basis of assessment results. </li></ul><ul><li>- Collins, 2001 </li></ul>
    29. 29. August 17 & 18, 2009 Seven Keys to Effective Teams <ul><li>Collaboration embedded in effective practice </li></ul><ul><li>Time for collaboration built in school calendar </li></ul><ul><li>Products of collaboration are made explicit </li></ul><ul><li>Team norms guide collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Teams pursue specific and measurable performance goals </li></ul><ul><li>Teams focus on key questions </li></ul><ul><li>Teams have access to relevant information </li></ul>
    30. 30. August 17 & 18, 2009 Four Corners: An exercise in understanding preferences in group work Structure Action Caring Vision-making
    31. 31. August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>Move to the corner that best represents the element most important to you initially as a group member/ most important at the start of a task </li></ul><ul><li>In your group discuss </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What are the positive attributes that you bring to the group? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What challenges might your group give to a group? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is a motto that represents your group </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who is a famous person that captures the essence of your group? This could be a non-fictional or fictional character. </li></ul></ul>
    32. 32. August 17 & 18, 2009 Types of Work for Teams <ul><li>Study groups </li></ul><ul><li>Examining student/teacher work </li></ul><ul><li>Analyzing student work </li></ul><ul><li>Development of a product/process/plan </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict resolution </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic planning </li></ul><ul><li>Problem solving processes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Collecting information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Generating ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organizing ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Narrowing ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluating ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Making decisions </li></ul></ul>
    33. 33. Day 2-August 18, 2009 <ul><li>Sharing Englewood’s Journey-Abraham Alarcon </li></ul><ul><li>Norms, Concensus </li></ul><ul><li>Protocols-Difficult Conversations </li></ul><ul><li>Englewood PLCs </li></ul><ul><li>Wiki Sharing </li></ul><ul><li>SMART Goals-ppt </li></ul>
    34. 34. August 17 & 18, 2009 Norms or Ground Rules <ul><li>Standards of behavior by which we all agree to operate while we are in this team </li></ul><ul><li>A behavior contract </li></ul><ul><li>Creating </li></ul><ul><li>Publicizing </li></ul><ul><li>Enforcing </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluating </li></ul>“ Norms are part of the culture. They exist whether or not you formalize them.” -Kathryn Bloomsack, education consultant
    35. 35. August 17 & 18, 2009
    36. 36. August 17 & 18, 2009 Norms <ul><li>Allow groups to build trust by actually doing substantive work together </li></ul><ul><li>Create structures that make it safe to ask challenging questions of each other </li></ul><ul><li>Build space for listening </li></ul><ul><li>Are ways to make the most of the time people have together </li></ul><ul><li>Open the opportunity to have deep, insightful conversations about teaching and learning </li></ul>
    37. 37. Arriving at Consensus <ul><li>All points of view have been heard. </li></ul><ul><li>The will of the group is evident even to those who most oppose it. </li></ul>
    38. 38. Fist to Five <ul><li>5 Fingers-I love this proposal. I will champion it. </li></ul><ul><li>4 Fingers-I strongly agree with the proposal. </li></ul><ul><li>3 Fingers-Your proposal is okay with me. I am willing to go along with it. </li></ul><ul><li>2 Fingers-I have reservations and am not yet ready to support the proposal. </li></ul><ul><li>1 Finger-I am opposed to the proposal. </li></ul><ul><li>Fist-If I were king or queen, I would veto this proposal, regardless of the will of the group. </li></ul>
    39. 39. August 17 & 18, 2009 Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team
    40. 40. Conflict or Conversation?
    41. 41. Responsive Turns <ul><li>Interrupt an encounter to change its momentum </li></ul><ul><li>Name an encounter to make its nature and consequence more obvious </li></ul><ul><li>Correct an encounter to provide an explanation for what is taking place and to rectify understandings and assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>Divert an encounter to the interaction in a different direction </li></ul>
    42. 42. Diffusing Strategies “ Speaking of Tom, when does basketball season start this year.” Moving the conversation in a different direction. Divert “ Mr. Smith was actually opposed to the plan.” Clarifying that a statement is not true. Correct “ I thought we agreed we weren’t going to gossip.” Describing what’s going on so everyone can see it. Name “ Oh, I’m late; I’ve gotta go.” Cutting off negative conversation before it begins. Interrupt
    43. 43. August 17 & 18, 2009 True or False <ul><li>Conflict is always a matter of right vs. wrong. </li></ul><ul><li>Conflicts are a result of behaviors – not personality clashes. </li></ul><ul><li>Most conflicts resolve themselves over time. </li></ul><ul><li>If you have a problem with someone, it’s up to you to sow the seeds of conflict. </li></ul><ul><li>Conflicts only impact the disputing parties. </li></ul><ul><li>We lack the skills and confidence needed to effectively address the issues we face. </li></ul>
    44. 44. Listening Concepts <ul><li>Misconceptions </li></ul><ul><li>Attentiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Self-awarenes </li></ul><ul><li>Honesty & Authenticity </li></ul><ul><li>Empathy & Respect </li></ul>
    45. 45. Listening Strategies <ul><li>Develop inner silence </li></ul><ul><li>Listening for what contradicts our assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>Communicating our understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Practicing every day </li></ul><ul><li>Practicing with terrible listeners </li></ul><ul><li>Developing a routine </li></ul>
    46. 46. Listening: Experimental Learning <ul><li>Protocol: </li></ul><ul><li>Find a partner. </li></ul><ul><li>Take turns explaining the communication challenge you are working on. </li></ul><ul><li>When your partner is talking, listen with all your heart. </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss with your partner the strategies you employed to be a good listener. </li></ul>
    47. 47. August 17 & 18, 2009 Some Definitions of Conflict <ul><li>Conflict is… </li></ul><ul><li>Destructive conflict is… </li></ul><ul><li>Constructive conflict is… </li></ul>
    48. 48. August 17 & 18, 2009 Ideal Conflict Point Artificial Harmony Mean-Spirited Personal attacks Constructive Destructive CONFLICT CONTINUUM Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable
    49. 49. August 17 & 18, 2009
    50. 50. August 17 & 18, 2009
    51. 51. August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>Facing a problem is no guarantee that you will solve it, bit not facing it is a guarantee that you won’t. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>James Baldwin </li></ul></ul></ul>
    52. 52. August 17 & 18, 2009 The Nature of Conflict <ul><li>Conflict is natural – neither negative or positive, it just is. </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict is just an interference pattern of energies. </li></ul><ul><li>Nature uses conflict as its primary motivator for change , creating beautiful beaches, canyons, mountains, and pearls. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s not whether you have conflict in your life. It’s what you do with that conflict that makes a difference . </li></ul>Thomas Crum, The Magic of Conflict
    53. 53. August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>Focus 90% of your time on solutions and only 10% of your time on problems. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Anthony J. D’Angelo </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>It takes two to quarrel, but only one to end it. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Spanish proverb </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    54. 54. August 17 & 18, 2009 Conflict Resolution Strategies <ul><li>Fierce Conversations </li></ul><ul><li>The Consultancy Protocol </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict Clarification Questions </li></ul>
    55. 55. August 17 & 18, 2009 What are Protocols? <ul><li>Agreed upon guidelines for a conversation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Everyone understands the structure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Permits the kind of conversation we are unused to having </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Vehicles for building the skills and culture </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Groups build trust </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collaborative and substantive work </li></ul></ul>
    56. 56. August 17 & 18, 2009 Why Protocols? <ul><li>Structure makes it safe to ask challenging questions </li></ul><ul><li>Ensures equity and parity of each person’s issue </li></ul><ul><li>Reflection </li></ul><ul><li>Differing perspectives new insights </li></ul><ul><li>Space for listening </li></ul><ul><li>Efficient use of time </li></ul>
    57. 57. Consultancy Protocol
    58. 58. August 17 & 18, 2009 <ul><li>The point is not to do the protocol well, but to have in-depth, insightful conversations about teaching and learning. </li></ul><ul><li>-National School Reform Faculty, Harmony Education Center www.nsrfharmony.org </li></ul>
    59. 59. August 17 & 18, 2009 Develop a team plan employing a “Powerful Design” Protocol <ul><li>With your team review the selected protocols </li></ul><ul><li>Design a plan for using one of the protocols with a real or fictitious team </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare a role play using the Plan for Professional Learning using a “Powerful Design” as a guideline for the demonstration </li></ul>
    60. 60. August 17 & 18, 2009 The use of protocols encourages an environment for learning that presumes the social construction of knowledge. It is an idea well supported by research. Hearing other people’s understandings, enables learners to gain and deepen their own understandings. - Bransford, Brown, & Cocking 1999
    61. 61. August 17 & 18, 2009 Exploring Problem Solving Processes using a Jigsaw Strategy <ul><li>Collecting information/data </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Affinity Process </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Generating ideas / Organizing ideas </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fault Tree Analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Narrowing and prioritizing ideas </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Idea writing </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Evaluating ideas </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reverse brain storming </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Making decisions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Weighted voting </li></ul></ul>
    62. 62. August 17 & 18, 2009 The Importance of Celebrating Success <ul><li>Sends a vivid message about what is important </li></ul><ul><li>Recipients feel valued an appreciated </li></ul><ul><li>Reinforces shared values/culture </li></ul><ul><li>Encourages and motivates others </li></ul><ul><li>Provides evidence of short term wins </li></ul><ul><li>Fun! </li></ul>
    63. 63. August 17 & 18, 2009 Celebration brainstorming <ul><li>Think about stopping occasionally to congratulate each other for a job well done. </li></ul><ul><li>The goal is to structure celebrations and recognitions into the school year </li></ul><ul><li>Share a testimonial about a special celebration or recognition you have experienced </li></ul><ul><li>Brainstorm ways to incorporate celebrations in schools and teams </li></ul>
    64. 64. August 17 & 18, 2009 REFLECTION 3-2-1 <ul><li>What are three priorities you have for enhancing your professional development activities? </li></ul><ul><li>What are two activities you will use to deepen knowledge of collaborative professional learning? </li></ul><ul><li>What is one commitment you make for this year to sustain the professional learning at your site? </li></ul>
    65. 65. August 17 & 18, 2009 Make an individual plan for a team or committee for which you are a member <ul><li>How could your team benefit from using; </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A teambuilding activity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Generations, Four Corners </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A problem solving process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Affinity Process, Fault Tree Analysis, Idea Writing, Reverse Brainstorming, Weighted Voting </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A conflict resolution process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The C.A.L.M. Model, Fierce Conversations </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A process for developing norms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A “Powerful Design” protocol </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Action Research, Case Discussions, Assessment as PD, Tuning Protocols </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A celebration /recognition event or program </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Select and complete one of the team or professional learning templates fro a plan you will implement </li></ul>
    66. 66. Transforming Professional Development <ul><li>From: ACTIVITY DRIVEN </li></ul><ul><li>Consensus of Opinions </li></ul><ul><li>Pull-out </li></ul><ul><li>Provider-driven </li></ul><ul><li>Individual leaning </li></ul><ul><li>Generic pedagogy </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on the adult’s work </li></ul><ul><li>Process orientation </li></ul><ul><li>Professional development </li></ul><ul><li>To: RESULTS-DRIVEN </li></ul><ul><li>Research-based standards </li></ul><ul><li>Daily job-embedded structures </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher-driven </li></ul><ul><li>Team learning </li></ul><ul><li>Content-specific pedagogy </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on student work </li></ul><ul><li>Results orientation </li></ul><ul><li>Professional Learning </li></ul>Adapted from Roberts, S. & Pruitt, E. (2003). Schools as professional learning communities: Collaborative activities and strategies for professional development. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin
    67. 67. August 17 & 18, 2009 N  S  D  C SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT LEADERSHIP PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CURRICULUM AND ASSESSMENT QUALITY TEACHING SCHOOL CULTURE SAFE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT DATA INTERVENTIONS VISION AND GOALS
    68. 68. Will Collaboration Work? 1.4 <ul><li>This </li></ul>
    69. 69. August 17 & 18, 2009 Decades Strategies Activity <ul><li>Each group is to reflect on life in a decade. </li></ul><ul><li>We request that you depict each decade as closely as you can imagine or remember </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What were the major discoveries? Fads? Trends? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What was home life like? Business? School life? Churches? Government? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What were the demographics? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who were some of the leaders? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>You will have about 15 minutes to work. Each group will report out. </li></ul>
    70. 70. August 17 & 18, 2009 Reflections <ul><li>What ideas stand out most in your mind about how life has changed over the decades? </li></ul><ul><li>What things/changes have the greatest impact on our students? </li></ul><ul><li>How do these ideas affect our students? </li></ul>Work alone and record your reflections, you will not be asked to share
    71. 71. August 17 & 18, 2009 Your Opinion <ul><li>What are the ten major reasons our schools must change? </li></ul><ul><li>What are your reactions to these compelling issues? </li></ul>
    72. 72. August 17 & 18, 2009 Your Opinion Turn to Your Elbow Partner <ul><li>What are the ten major reasons our schools must change? </li></ul><ul><li>What are your reactions to these compelling issues? </li></ul>
    73. 73. Collaboration <ul><li>Why should we collaborate? </li></ul><ul><li>What questions should guide our collaboration? </li></ul><ul><li>Big Ideas? </li></ul>
    74. 74. Skillful Collaboration: <ul><li>Problem Solving Skills </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Defining the problem </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Getting to root causes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Brainstorming solutions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Decision Making Skills </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Building Consensus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Clarifying decision modes and authority </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Communication Skills </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Listening, advocacy, and inquiry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Giving and receiving feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resolving conflict </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Group Process Skills </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Team building </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Group process observations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conflict management </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Meeting Skills </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Designing and using agendas and protocols </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sharing meeting roles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Posting ideas </li></ul></ul>Building Shared Responsibility for Student Learning Conzemius, A. and O’Neill, J., 2001
    75. 75. August 17 & 18, 2009 Team builders <ul><li>Builds trust </li></ul><ul><li>Acceptance of differences </li></ul><ul><li>Surfaces commitment </li></ul><ul><li>Create energy </li></ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul><ul><li>Personal connections </li></ul><ul><li>Humor </li></ul><ul><li>Sense of community </li></ul>
    76. 76. August 17 & 18, 2009 Evolution of a Professional Learning Community <ul><li>Single teachers, individual classrooms which led to teaching what they knew of curriculum and instruction </li></ul><ul><li>1980s, team teaching, open classrooms which led to increase in teacher morale and motivation </li></ul><ul><li>More recently, teacher as collaborator which has led to a focus on the team’s work </li></ul><ul><li>Most recently, standards and student achievement which has led to educators as learners </li></ul>
    77. 77. August 17 & 18, 2009 The Seven Norms of Collaborative Work <ul><li>Pausing </li></ul><ul><li>Paraphrasing </li></ul><ul><li>Probing </li></ul><ul><li>Putting ideas on the table </li></ul><ul><li>Paying attention to self and others </li></ul><ul><li>Presuming positive intentions </li></ul><ul><li>Pursuing a balance between advocacy and inquiry </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Adapted from William Baker, Group Dynamics Associates, 720 Grizzly Peak Blvd., Berkeley CA 94708(2004) Reprinted with permission from: The Adaptive School: Developing and Facilitating Collaborative Groups, Robert Garmston and Bruce Wellman,. </li></ul></ul>
    78. 78. Adult Relationships in Schools <ul><li>Parallel Play </li></ul><ul><li>Adversarial </li></ul><ul><li>Congenial </li></ul><ul><li>Collegial </li></ul>Roland Barth, 2005
    79. 79. Collegiality Survey <ul><li>A. We TALK openly with one another about practice. </li></ul><ul><li>B. We OBSERVE one another while we are engaged in our work. </li></ul><ul><li>C. We SHARE OUR CRAFT KNOWLEDGE with one another. </li></ul><ul><li>D. We are actively committed to HELPING ONE ANOTHER BECOME BETTER at what we do. </li></ul><ul><li>1 2 3 4 </li></ul><ul><li>1 2 3 4 </li></ul><ul><li>1 2 3 4 </li></ul><ul><li>1 2 3 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Almost never </li></ul><ul><li>Occasionally </li></ul><ul><li>Frequently </li></ul><ul><li>Almost always </li></ul>Roland Barth, 2005
    80. 80. Collegiality comes when the school leaders: <ul><li>Clearly State expectations for collegiality </li></ul><ul><li>Model collegiality </li></ul><ul><li>Reward collegiality </li></ul><ul><li>Protect collegiality </li></ul>Roland Barth, 2005
    81. 81. Shift in Focus <ul><li>A Shift in the Work of Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>From isolation…to collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>From each teacher clarifying what students must learn…to collaborative teams building shared knowledge and understanding about essential learning. </li></ul><ul><li>From each teacher assigning priority to different learning standards…to collaborative teams establishing the priority of respective learning standards. </li></ul><ul><li>From each teacher determining the pacing of the curriculum …to collaborative teams of teachers agreeing on common pacing. </li></ul>
    82. 82. What Does Research Say? <ul><li>Text As Expert-EFFECTIVE TEACHING MATTERS-reading </li></ul><ul><li>Jigsaw Protocol </li></ul>
    83. 83. Questions to Guide Reading <ul><li>Why do we need to continually improve and adapt our instruction? </li></ul><ul><li>Why should be work in professional learning teams? </li></ul><ul><li>How can working together on instruction make a difference for us? </li></ul><ul><li>How can working together on instruction make a difference for our students? </li></ul>
    84. 84. Until Next Week Thank you for allowing us to learn together.
    85. 85. Protocols for Reflective Dialog
    86. 86. Phases of group development Forming Storming Norming Performing
    87. 87. After Using Tool 1 What do I know/What do we know? Reflection 1.1 <ul><li>Reflect: What value did working with a group add when answering these questions? </li></ul><ul><li>Reflect: What might be (or is) the value of regularly working with a group of teachers to improve instructional practices? </li></ul>
    88. 88. Reflective Practice can be considered <ul><li>“ The practice or act of analyzing our actions, decisions, or products by focusing on our process of achieving them.” (Killion & Todnem) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Deliberate thinking about action, with a view on improvement.” (Loughran) </li></ul><ul><li>“ The practice of periodically stepping back to ponder the meaning of what has recently transpired...probing to a deeper level than the trail and error experience.” (Raelin) </li></ul>
    89. 89. Experience Learning Reflection
    90. 90. Why engage in reflective practice? <ul><ul><li>Reflective practice increases learning at the individual and organizational level so that educational practice continuously improves and student learning is enhanced. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adults learn, retain, and use what they perceive is relevant to their professional needs Professional Development for All in Inclusive Schools </li></ul></ul>
    91. 91. No one prepares you for the path: some stones are slippery.
    92. 92. Conditions for Powerful Reflection <ul><li>Trust </li></ul><ul><li>Be present </li></ul><ul><li>Be open </li></ul><ul><li>Listen: with empathy, without judgement </li></ul><ul><li>Seek understanding </li></ul><ul><li>View Learning as mutual </li></ul><ul><li>Honor the person & the process </li></ul>
    93. 93. <ul><li>Team norms: Protocols or commitments developed by each team to guide members in working together. Norms help team members clarify expectations regarding how they will work together to achieve shared goals. </li></ul>
    94. 94. Theory of action for reflective practice Pause Openness Inquiry Thinking Learning Enhanced Student Learning Action Reflective Practice to Improve Schools, 2006 Corwin Press
    95. 95. Banner Questions <ul><li>Add to the list of banner questions. </li></ul>
    96. 96. Phases of group development Forming Storming Norming Performing
    97. 97. Expanding thought & inquiry <ul><li>Ask open questions: intonation, syntax, presupposition </li></ul><ul><li>Respond with SPACE: silence [ SILENCE IS SOMETIMES THE ANSWER] , paraphasing, accepting, clarifying & elaborating </li></ul><ul><li>Reframe: Apply new frames to widen views </li></ul><ul><li>Dialog: Engage in conversations that deepen understanding </li></ul>
    98. 98. Reflective Writing Protocol Describe from your experience… <ul><li>What is it we expect students to learn? </li></ul><ul><li>How will we know when they have learned it? </li></ul><ul><li>How will we respond when they do not learn? </li></ul><ul><li>How will we respond when they already know it? </li></ul>
    99. 99. Effective Teaching Matters By Anne Jolly <ul><li>You will work in groups of four. </li></ul><ul><li>Each person will read one part of the article. </li></ul><ul><li>Using the 4 A’S protocol </li></ul><ul><li>The group reads silently highlighting and writing notes. </li></ul><ul><li>What assumptions does the author of the text hold? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you Agree with? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you Agrue with? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you Aspire to? </li></ul>
    100. 100. What is a tuning protocol? <ul><li>Facilitated, focused conversation </li></ul><ul><li>Formal structure of steps and guidelines </li></ul><ul><li>Case study </li></ul><ul><li>Collegial experience </li></ul><ul><li>A tool to help “tune” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>our practice </li></ul></ul>
    101. 101. A Definition <ul><li>A tuning protocol is a “way a teacher presents actual work before a group of thoughtful ‘critical friends’ in a structured reflective discourse aimed at ‘tuning’ the work to higher standards.” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Joe McDonald in “Three Pictures of an Exhibition (1995) </li></ul></ul>
    102. 102. When is a tuning protocol used? <ul><li>Answer questions about student performance </li></ul><ul><li>Inform instruction and assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Explore efficacy of programs, initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>Helps identify effective teaching strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes reflective practice </li></ul>
    103. 103. Why does it work? <ul><li>Risk-free way to get at what makes a difference in learning </li></ul><ul><li>Problem-solving approach </li></ul><ul><li>Presenters feel good, learn </li></ul><ul><li>Work receives serious consideration </li></ul><ul><li>Participants learn </li></ul><ul><li>Process stimulates a learning community </li></ul>
    104. 104. What a tuning protocol is NOT! <ul><li>Opportunity for “one-upmanship” </li></ul><ul><li>Showcase for validation </li></ul><ul><li>Haven for venting about students, parents, administrators, instruction in earlier grades </li></ul>
    105. 105. The Pedigree <ul><li>Harvard Project Zero </li></ul><ul><li>Coalition of Essential Schools </li></ul><ul><li>--Joe McDonald, Brown University, 1995 </li></ul><ul><li>Academy for Educational Development </li></ul><ul><li>“ There is emerging evidence that some versions of looking at student work yield benefits for teaching and learning.” </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>--Little, Gearhart, Curry, and Kafka (2003) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    106. 106. One School’s Story <ul><li>Research initiative at the high school </li></ul><ul><li>Use of the tuning protocol </li></ul><ul><li>Contributions of the tuning protocol </li></ul>
    107. 107. Feedback from Teachers <ul><li>“ To me, the value of this process is learning from other teachers their strategies for improving a lesson.” “…useful and helpful.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Most of our group participated enthusiastically in all steps of the protocol.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ During the discussion, people brainstormed, productively building on their colleagues’ comments.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ On the whole, this was a very positive experience.” “Well worth the time.” </li></ul>
    108. 108. The warts <ul><li>“ A couple of the group members appeared shy about participating.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ The group seemed tentative at first…” </li></ul><ul><li>“… this activity puts us in a vulnerable role.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ The protocol feels contrived.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ The presenter got a lot of feedback about what was wrong but had hoped for more feedback about how to achieve the specific goals he expressed.” </li></ul>
    109. 109. The protocol <ul><li>Who? </li></ul><ul><li>Groups of 8-11 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Facilitator </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Presenter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Participants </li></ul></ul>
    110. 110. The procedure <ul><li>Presentation (15 min.) </li></ul><ul><li>Clarifying Questions (5 min.) </li></ul><ul><li>Individual Note-taking (5 min.) </li></ul><ul><li>Participant Discussion (15 min.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Warm and Cool Feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Presenter Reflection (15 min.) </li></ul><ul><li>Debriefing (10 min.) </li></ul>
    111. 111. Guidelines <ul><li>Respect the presenter. </li></ul><ul><li>Watch time. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t skip the debriefing segment. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Keep groups stable. </li></ul><ul><li>Contribute to substantive discourse </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Give both warm and cool feedback. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More “cool,” please </li></ul></ul>
    112. 112. August 17 & 18, 2009 Warm and Cool Feedback <ul><li>Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>#1 We all want to get better in the work we do. </li></ul><ul><li>#2 We all want to be courteous. </li></ul><ul><li>#3 In order to accomplish #1, we need to be thoughtful, insightful, and provocative. </li></ul><ul><li>#4 We are in this together </li></ul>
    113. 113. Warm Feedback <ul><li>Statements that let the presenter know what is working. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Praise for what is effective </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Specific </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“That’s great!” =X </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“Good job!” =X </li></ul></ul></ul>
    114. 114. Cool Feedback <ul><li>Statements or questions that help the presenter move forward. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What if? I wonder what would happen if… </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Not criticism---critique </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Improve the work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improve the context </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not about the presenter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No “should” or Why didn’t you?” </li></ul></ul>
    115. 115. August 17 & 18, 2009 What can be tuned <ul><li>Any written form </li></ul><ul><li>Performance or demonstration on audiotape or videotape </li></ul><ul><li>Artwork </li></ul><ul><li>Computer multi-media presentation </li></ul><ul><li>Display </li></ul>
    116. 116. Selection criteria <ul><li>One piece for one student </li></ul><ul><li>One piece from several students </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple pieces from the same students </li></ul><ul><li>Drafts of a single piece from a single student </li></ul><ul><li>One that represents best or worst or middle </li></ul><ul><li>A randomly chosen piece </li></ul>
    117. 117. Focusing Questions <ul><li>What does this work tell us about what students know and are able to do? </li></ul><ul><li>Is this piece good enough for students in 6 th grade? How can we help this student (and all students) make it good enough? </li></ul><ul><li>How could the instruction that surrounds this work execute a better product? </li></ul>
    118. 118. Importance of Debriefing <ul><li>GOAL—Are teachers learning about their students and their practice? </li></ul><ul><li>Presenter discusses how the protocol worked </li></ul><ul><li>Participants discuss how the protocol worked </li></ul><ul><li>Sample reflection questions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What did we learn about student research? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What did we learn about the protocol and ourselves? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Did we actually focus on student work or on other issues? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How could our process be improved? </li></ul></ul>
    119. 119. Quotes <ul><li>“ The ability to collaborate—on both a large and small scale—is one of the core requisites of post modern society.” Fullan </li></ul><ul><li>“ The most promising strategy for sustained, substantive school improvement is developing the ability of school personnel to function as professional learning communities.” DuFour & Eaker </li></ul><ul><li>The most crucial questions educators can ask themselves are ‘What do we truly believe about our selves and our students?” and “Do our practices match our beliefs?” </li></ul><ul><li>The moment teachers begin to closely examine their lessons and the results of those lessons, instruction improves and competence increases. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Sometimes we forget that the purpose—the real agenda—of a team meeting is not to cover a set of topics, but more importantly to continuously generate solutions to instructional problems in order to get better results.” Mike Schmoker from Results Fieldbook , 2001 </li></ul>
    120. 120. Quotes <ul><li>“ The ability to collaborate—on both a large and small scale—is one of the core requisites of post modern society.” Fullan </li></ul><ul><li>“ The most promising strategy for sustained, substantive school improvement is developing the ability of school personnel to function as professional learning communities.” DuFour & Eaker </li></ul><ul><li>The most crucial questions educators can ask themselves are ‘What do we truly believe about our selves and our students?” and “Do our practices match our beliefs?” </li></ul><ul><li>The moment teachers begin to closely examine their lessons and the results of those lessons, instruction improves and competence increases. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Sometimes we forget that the purpose—the real agenda—of a team meeting is not to cover a set of topics, but more importantly to continuously generate solutions to instructional problems in order to get better results.” Mike Schmoker from Results Fieldbook , 2001 </li></ul>
    121. 121. Works Cited <ul><li>Easton, Lois. Collaboratively Examining Student Work: Why and How . Oct.2, 2003. </li></ul><ul><li>Little, Judith Warren,et al. “Looking at Student Work For Teacher Learning, Teacher Community, and School Reform. Phi Delta Kappan . November 2003. </li></ul>
    122. 122. The world is round and the place that may seem like the end may also only be the beginning. Ivy baker priest
    123. 123. Whirlwinds Can Get in the Way of Finding Time to Collaborate

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