Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

E-learning in a Rural Context Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications

3,504

Published on

E-learning in a Rural Context …

E-learning in a Rural Context
Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications

David Rose - e-Learning Advisor JISC RSC SW

Susanna‐Sofia Keskinarkaus, University of Helsinki, Ruralia Institute

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,504
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
39
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.    E-learning in a Rural Context  Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications           January 2011
  • 2.   E-learning in a Rural Context   Alternative Media and Contemporary Applications  A report produced in the context of the e‐ruralnet project   Authors:David Rowe JISC Advance‐Regional Support Centre ‐ South West, Susanna‐Sofia Keskinarkaus, University of Helsinki, Ruralia Institute     With the support of the Lifelong Learning Programme, Key Activity 3,  ICT of the European Union    Disclaimer: This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.   Project Nr: 143418‐LLP‐12008‐1‐GR‐KA3‐KA3NW 2
  • 3.   Executive Summary This report presents a comprehensive review of the problems rural learners and e‐learning businesses encounter within the partner countries when attempting to use e‐learning in a rural  location.  It  also  provides  a  short  digest  of  the  result  of  the  extensive  research undertaken  as  part  of  the  e‐ruralnet  project  which  provided  the  underpinning  sound theoretical basis for the information contained in this report. The report goes on to examine existing  barriers  to  the  provision  of  broadband  access  within  rural  areas  it  also  proposes some possible solutions based on proven solutions contained within dedicated case studies. The  report  also  contains  a  wide‐ranging  examination  of  the  types  of  alternative  media available  for  supporting  e‐learning  and  proposes  some  new  and  innovative  uses  for  these technologies.  Best  practice  examples  are  also  utilised  to  present  application of alternative media to e‐learning. 3
  • 4.  Table of Contents Introduction  5 PART 1. A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE  6 1.1 Literature Review ‐ E‐learning  6 1.2 A critical look at e‐learning ‐ Implementation & quality  7 1.3 E‐learning and business  17 PART 2. THE E‐LEARNING MARKET 20 2.1 Introduction  20 2.2 Access to and delivery of e‐learning 20 2.3 Challenges associated with rural e‐learning 22 PART 3. ALTERNATIVE MEDIA  27 3.1 Study of the typical uses and descriptors of alternative media  27 3.2 Learning by Gaming & Simulations  34 3.3 Innovativeness and best practice  37 SUMMARY  40 Terminology  42 Examples of popular social and learning software  43 Bibliography  44  4
  • 5.  INTRODUCTION The e‐Learning in a Rural Context report is a constituent part of the e‐ruralnet project, one which addresses e‐learning as a means for enhancing lifelong learning opportunities in rural areas, with particular emphasis on the needs of SMEs, micro‐enterprises, the self‐employed and persons seeking employment. E‐ruralnet is a European Network project part‐funded by the  European  Commission  in  the  context  of  the  Lifelong  Learning Programme, Transversal projects KA3‐ICT. The e‐Learning in a Rural Context report looks to address two issues identified by research as being of major importance in the previous Observatory Study phase of the project. 1.  Access to e‐learning for rural areas that have inadequate and in some cases no access to  national ICT infrastructures 2.  New  and  potentially  innovative  approaches  to  learning  introduced  through  the  use  of  new interactive ICT tools such as web 2.0., Wikis, podcasts etc. To support the above issues the possibility of using alternative technologies in addition to computers is examined i.e. the use of mobile telephones, DVDs and other mobile devices, as well as new approaches to learning e.g. Simulation and Learning through Gaming.Part 1 of the report examines some of the leading literature on e‐learning and among other it looks at what constitutes e‐learning. Issues which apply to Institutional users, learners and assessors/instructors/teachers are also examined.Part  2  looks  at  e‐learning  in  the  context  of  the  market.  It  outlines  the  results  from  the research  undertaken  by  e‐ruralnet  and  examines  a  range  of  issues  as  they  apply  to  the particular difficulties experienced by rural e‐learners, both at the implementation level of e‐learning and from the organizational point of view. It also focuses on quality issues related to the composition and delivery of e‐learning. Part 3 looks at alternative media and presents alternative delivery methods i.e. standalone technology that may be of particular use within rural areas where connection to the internet is either poor or non‐existent. It also evaluates the use of new technology based tools and multi‐media developments. Finally it examines the value of learning through gaming and simulations as they apply to the rural e‐learner and presents a selection of best practice examples on innovativeness and alternative media from the e‐ruralnet online Library of Best Practice.  5
  • 6.  PART 1. A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE1.1 Literature Review ‐ E‐learning 1.1.1 The accepted definition of e‐Learning is learning facilitated by the use of technology usually described as Information Communication Technology or ICT 1 using some or all of the following  technologies:  Computers,  Internet,  Audio,  Video,  Satellite  broadcast,  Interactive TV, CD‐ROM, Mobile telephones etc. Many learning businesses already use a vast array of electronic  tools  related  to  providing  or  supporting  learning:  Internet  or  World  Wide  Web, Internal  Intranet,  Course  management  systems,  Office  programs,  Calculators,  Electronic calendars, E‐presentations and E‐mail. The embedding of the use of these types of tools in some organisations is now at the level where there use is not advertises but taken as the norm. 1.1.2 Over the last few years there has been a huge amount of hype about e‐learning from all  sorts  of  organisations  but  especially  governments  who  see  this  as  the  way  forward  for whole economies. So what is all the e‐learning hype about? Work, study and life in general have become increasingly mobile, solutions were and are needed to address this 2, espoused the creation of the ability to learn both informally and formally on‐the‐go via E‐learning. The sue of technology allows learners to study independent of time, place or facility via on‐line access  to  teachers,  experts  and  support  services  as  well  as  enabling  communication  with peers. In a true knowledge economy, e‐learning fosters key skills such as the ability to auto update work related skills, without reference to superiors or formalised updating processes like in‐house training & development, the finding and processing of information, or working with new technologies and working in teams 3.1.1.3  Asynchronous  or  on  demand  e‐learning  enables  reproducing  the  learning  event multiple times after the initial creation phase, maximizing cost‐efficiency and minimising the need  to  re‐invent  resources  individually.  Synchronous  or  online  (group  or  individual)  e‐learning enables participants from different locations to participate in training, saving them travelling costs and increasing the efficiency of delivery. E‐learning provides the facility for learners  to  become  proactive  giving  them  access  to  a  much  wider  range  of  materials  and methods  than  can  be  provided  by  a  single  tutor.  The  main  advantages  of  e‐learning  as opposed  to  traditional  pedagogical  approaches  are  flexibility,  efficiency  and  equality  of access and delivery. E‐learning at its best is also very convenient for all involved parties.Although the flexibility provided by e‐learning represents a significant incentive in the area of  lifelong  learning,  there  is  much  more  to  e‐learning  than  freedom.  E‐learning  enables learners  to  network,  interacting  with  their  fellow  learners  and  peers  and  learners  from other businesses. Learning from each other in interactive forums as well as developing new forms  of learning is another facet of the pro‐active approach to learning. E‐learning can if properly resourced enable learners in rural locations to participate in training on an equal basis to those geographically adjacent to the institution, this is especially true in niche fields of interest where local training may be completely nonexistent or numbers of learners are below the level required to make conventional delivery economic. It has also been proved 1  Ellis, 2007 2  Devi, 2006 3  see Mason & Rennie, 2004  6
  • 7.  that  e‐learning  can  increase  the  quality  and  cost‐effectiveness  of  learning  while  reducing actual costs of delivery 4.    Case  Study:  Use  of  ICT,  Remote  Competence  Assessments  in  Urban/Rural  Areas  ‐ S&B Automotive Academy – Jericho NetCam   S&B  Automotive  Academy  is  a  training  provider  specialising  in  the  delivery  of Apprentiships  for  the  motor  industry  and  looked  at  ways  of  using  technology  to address  the  assessing/support  needs  of  their  learners.  To  complete  these qualifications  the  learner  has  to  be  observed  completing  a  number  of  competence based  repair  tasks;  however,  if  as  was  the  case  the  learner  is  based  in  the  Orkney Islands  and  the  assessor  in  Glasgow  this  can  lead  to  significant  inefficiencies,  if  for example the assessor travels 400+ miles to carry out an assessment only to find that no suitable task is available. Similarly if the learner contacts their assessor and states that  they  now  have  access  to  a  long  awaited  task  the  assessor  may  not  be  able  to physically travel in time. With the use of innovative NetCam technology the learner’s workplace is equipped with 2 wireless NetCams, one fixed and one mobile connected to  the  employer’s  internet  connection.  The  learner  is  also  supplied  with  a  modified hands free phone held in a waist belt. The assessor can now view the workplace from base adjusting the cameras and talking to the learner to assess their competence on demand  without  leaving  base.  The  assessment  is  recorded  and  stored  on  a  Virtual Learning Environment and the learner’s e‐portfolio. The technology can also be used for  learning  reviews  where  the  assessor  and  the  learners  discuss  progress  and  plan further  activities.  The  organisation  estimates  that  the  use  of  this  technology  will reduce its assessing costs over the next few years by up to 30%.     1.1.3 (con) Ideally, e‐learning eliminates the barriers of time, distance and socio‐economic status 5,  enabling  people  and  organizations  to  keep  abreast  of  changes  in  the  global economy 6.  The  meaning  and  potential  of  real‐time  access  to  information  is  as  relevant within  rural  areas  as  it  is  within  urban  areas  and  cannot  be  neglected  in  contemporary economies. The e‐learning market is expanding all the time and currently includes activities by:  researchers,  business‐customers,  consumers,  end‐users,  IT‐providers  and  content creation  organisations,  educational  organizations  and  in‐house  training  by  larger organisations. 1.2 A critical look at e‐learning ‐ Implementation & quality 1.2.1  There  is  nothing  mystical  about  adopting  e‐learning  in  the  curriculum.  Ellis  &  Calvo (2007) raise issues that need to be addressed when embracing e‐learning: 4, 5  see Gunasekaran et al., 2002  6  Harun, 2002  7
  • 8.  1. Decision (What is the learning’s purpose) 2. Planning (Resources, technology) 3. Development (Depth, scope and trialling) 4. Teaching (Training, learning) 5. Evaluation (Has the learner moved on)The creation of modern relevant e‐learning materials using common open source software or  commercial  packages  can  be  a  relatively  simple  process;  however,  Ellis  &  Calvo,  2007 remind  us  that  acquainted  with  the  processes  takes  time  that  must  be  adequately resourced.There are some key points to be acknowledged when implementing e‐learning:  Instructors ‐ competence, teaching style and attitude  Student ‐ time management, discipline, computer skills learning style and ability to learn  IT  ‐  bandwidth,  security,  network  accessibility,  audio  and  video  plug‐ins,  authorization,  licenses, Internet, instructions, videoconferencing   Organization ‐ support) 7E‐learning can be conducted in many forms:  as single courses,   course components, units or modules   entire programs,  8 Delivered via many methods:  e‐lectures  web‐based interactive learning  virtual classrooms  digital collaboration etc 9 With many pedagogical approaches:  student centred learning   learning by doing or experiential learning  collaborative learning  distributed learning  flexible learning etc. 10 7  see Selim 2007 8  see Barker, 2007 9  see Shee & Wang, 2008 10  Beyth‐Marom et al., 2003  8
  • 9.  1.2.2  By  adapting  the  Shee  &  Wang  (2008)  model  for  evaluating  web‐based  e‐learning systems, the following hierarchy can be drawn for evaluating e‐learning:1.2.3 Examples of e‐learning in different fields:  Army  Using  simulations  and  games  to  rehearse  for  combat  situations,  team  work  and  vehicle/equipment training  Arts  Using  design  software,  surfing  for  inspiration  around  the  globe,  accessing  knitting  patterns and instructions (text, pictures, videos), finding material comparisons  Business Virtual company tours, business examples, reading consumer feedback on own  and  competitor  products,  scouting  company  brand  image,  keeping  an  eye  on  the  competitors, business skill courses  Emergency  services  Using  simulations  to  practice  emergency  situation  roles  and  coordination. Using video recordings of real‐life situations to train decision‐making and  responses  Engineering  Virtual  laboratories,  online  software  course,  .pdf  designs  and  layouts,  simulations of factory processes  Science  Collaborative  mind  mapping,  writing  papers  as  an  international  team  (send  versions  by  e‐mail,  post  newest  version  on  an  intranet),  finding  material  online,  searching for partners  9
  • 10.   Medicine Diagnosis discussions, simulations of procedures, recent findings and studies,  conference proceedings, video recordings of lectures, statistical data, seminars  Agriculture Crop tests  Law Case studies, forums on laws under amendment, new court decisions  Social  sciences  Joint  analysis  of  qualitative/quantitative  data  with  shared  analysis  software, discussing plausibility of conclusions in online communities of practice  Philosophy Reflection with colleagues on forums Physical  education  Training  schedules  on  online  databases,  progress  follow‐up  reports,  technique guidance on YouTube  Languages Online dictionaries, vocabulary tests, audio pronunciation guidance on mp3  11  Case Study: ZigZag   The BBC runs a web‐site and online courses for journalists in countries where freedom of  expression and press are not the cultural norm (Iran, Afghanistan). In the interactive virtual  newsroom, novice journalists can participate in day‐to‐day activities of an actual  newsroom and learn from experiences colleagues.  Blogs are popular in Iran but due to the governmental system, objectivity is not emphasized in national training. The BBC World Service Trust’s aim is to “softly” train journalists about western models of thinking rather than change the world overnight. The covered issues are non‐sensitive and educative rather than highly debated and political. But having said that, ZigZag  does  promote  open  dialogue  and  interaction  on  the  forum  where  articles  are actively  discussed  and  commented  on.  In  addition  to  the  online  newsroom  and  forum, zigzag  has  a  radio  component.  ZigZag  is  blocked  in  Iran  and  the  only  way  to  deliver information  is  through  e‐learning  to  those  learners  who  can  bypass  control  with  a  VPN connection or like connection. There is still the issue of possible danger to the trainees for being associated with ZigZag. In Glaser’s (2007) article about ZigZag, a commentator says that  learners  can  only  be  accessed  online  because  face‐to‐face training is not possible at all. Originally BBC tried to keep the program under the radar but the widespread blogger attention  and  huge  demand  for  the  training  slots,  ZigZag  was  noticed  by  the  Iranian authorities. According to BBC World Trust, ZigZagMag is set to run until July 2011.    1.2.4 Ladyshewsky (2004) not only emphasizes the importance of keeping the size of on‐line discussion groups limited but also usefully draws our attention to the pedagogical principles of e‐learning: student‐teacher contact ‐ email and bulletin boards 11  further developed from Gunasekaran et al., 2002  10
  • 11.   active learning techniques ‐ problem solving, inquiry and project based tasks  prompt feedback ‐ person to person and within groups communication of high expectations ‐ making criteria and learning outcomes explicit  time on task ‐ fostering awareness of time constraints and making contributions relevant respect for diverse learning communities ‐ learners given freedom to control and explore  reciprocity and collaboration among learners ‐ collaboration, peer learning and  assessment  Creating  online  courses  or  e‐leaning  material  can  initially  be  a  time‐consuming  and  cost intensive activity; however, once created the facility to use the materials intensively across perhaps more than one course can make it a cost effective exercise. The cost of e‐learning materials typically includes the input from:  subject experts  internet specialists  interface designers  multi‐media designers technical back up copyright clearance  Whilst delivery expenses include:  servers  tutoring or the cost re‐training existing staff  administration 121.2.5  As  in  all  learning,  attention  in  e‐learning  soon  turns  to  questions  about  quality. Deepwell  (2007)  infers  that  quality  in  e‐learning  can  refer  to  a  range  of  aspects  including, teacher expectations, sophistication, and purposefulness or student satisfaction but usually centres on the product. “A predominant focus in discussions of quality in e‐learning centres on  the  product  of  e‐learning,  such  as  a  course,  a  tool,  or  even  a  new  mode  of  delivery”. There  is  a  tendency  to  regard  the  product  in  isolation  from  the  systems,  processes,  and culture  surrounding  its  implementation  and  consequently  pay  little  attention  to  the requirements  and  responsibilities  of  a  wider  group  of  stakeholders  than  the  course  or product  development  team,  tutors,  and  learners.  Deepwell,  2007  states  that  “distinctive feature of e‐learning is, however, its dependence on institutional infrastructure and access to technologies beyond the control of the tutor.” Deepwell (2007) also emphasizes that the responsibility for e‐learning quality lies at the hands of the whole organization and not the teacher/student. New learning pathways challenge organizational strategies and resources in addition to the teacher.  12  see Downbeythes, 2001  11
  • 12.  The domains to be addressed when evaluating e‐learning quality 13: Barker (2007) expands on this by presenting a check‐list for e‐learning:13  Adapted from Cousin et al., 2004 in Deepwell, 2007; Frydenberg, 2002  12
  • 13.  1.2.6 The challenges experienced when implementing e‐learning may arise from inadequate hardware,  learner  isolation,  insufficient  support,  learner/trainer  IT‐skills  or  the  ability  to judge  quality 14.  The  effectiveness  of  e‐learning  has  also  been  criticized  perhaps  unfairly when delivered using unreliable computer systems, poor quality time management or poor quality content 15.For successful e‐learning:  Engage content and technology experts in the process  Plan the course content in detail  Plan what devices the course designed to work on  Prepare both online and offline content.  Provide the learners with tutors and technical support.  Make sure all backup systems are functioning.  Ensure proper software licenses are in place  Double‐check copyrights of content  Make the content interesting:  • ensure you have enough pictures compared to the amount of text  • create blogs,  • invest in collaborative tools: chat rooms, discussion forums, social media etc.  • utilize e‐books, articles, documents, links, cases, lectures, video, audio, presentations  Pay attention to user‐friendliness:  • search‐functions, save‐options, downloading file size, clarity of presentation etc.  Create a FAQ list of plus contact instructions for instructors etc  Update content regularly  Use  a  blended  approach  by  mixing  different  elements:  lectures,  online  material,  downloadable  material,  face‐to‐face  meetings,  teleconferences,  videoconferences,  tutorials, online practices, assignments, video case studies etc.  Test both course content and functionality   Test the technology Collect feedback.     14  see Sambrook, 2003 15  Harun, 2002  13
  • 14.  1.2.7 The commonly used term Blended learning (also known as “hybrid learning”) refers to mixing  learning  environments,  i.e.  combining  face‐to‐face  and  e‐learning  elements.  This method has proved to be the most effective method as it provides a high degree of support for  learners.  Traditional  teaching  methods  now  routinely  utilise  technology  via  various electronic  methods such as PowerPoint‐presentations, DVDs and audio. One popular form of  blended  learning  is  arranging  at  least  one  face‐to‐face  meeting  before  proceeding  with the online collaboration in order to introduce the learners and lecturers to each other.Many authors have noted that e‐learning is still learning and ICT does not cause learning to happen. Learning both formal and informal continues to be “an active, constructive and goal oriented  process  which  is  enhanced  by  sharing  and  equality  during  discussion” 16.  The process  of  learning  is  traditional  to  an  extensive  degree.  McLoughlin 17    points  out  that  IT should  be  used  to  increase  human  interaction.  E‐learning  differs  from  traditional  distance learning  mainly  in  speed  and  interaction.  It  facilitates  reflective  learning  both  in  physical contact  and  distance  contexts.  As  student  demography  changes  so  the  processes  for  life‐long learning must change. There  is  now  a  technological  opportunity  for  learning  to  develop  beyond  face‐to‐face contact  and  still  remain  real  time,  efficient  and  successful.  Research  supports  e‐learning success 18  but  is  also  hard  to  evaluate  due  to  numerous  variables.  For  example,  E‐learning and face‐to‐face learning in different contexts and on different subjects are quite impossible to  compare  in  any  meaningful  way.  It  is  frequently  argues  that  Distance  Learning  makes learning more accessible, more convenient, more effective, and more cost‐efficient for both the learners and the provider(Barker, 2007) 19.  However, this success depends on the level and quality of support provided to the learner. However, what matters in the end is the outcome. If the learners/organisations opt for e‐learning and instructors find that it works, it is worth promoting not only as an option or an addition to traditional learning but as a fully viable alternative to mainstream learning. It has even  been  proposed  that  communication  in  e‐learning  may  have  greater  quality  than  in traditional  learning 20.  However,  despite  almost  universal  access  to  electronic  apparatuses such as telephones, TVs and radios these all require some sort of connection to the outside world. But there are still vast areas and numerous people without feasible access to online resources.  E‐learning  is  still  possible  via  standalone  systems  such  as  DVDs,  e‐books,  mp3‐players and downloadable material like games and files. Computers can also be pre‐loaded with  e‐learning  material  and  used  offline.  However,  these  devices  lose  out  on  the  biggest advantages  of  online  systems  which  are  synchronous  communication  and  continuous updates.1.2.8 Contemporary e‐learners come from all ages and all possible life situations. They are seeking  flexible  forms  of  learning  at  different  stages  of  their  lives  and  careers.  E‐learning allows learners to choose courses/qualifications from the most appropriate provider instead of  the  closest  provider  geographically.  Learners  may  also  combine  their  curriculum  from 16 , 18    Ladyshewsky, 2004 17  2000 in Ladyshewsky, 2004  19  Barker, 2007 20  Dewar, 1999  14
  • 15.  multiple  providers 21.  It  is  important  for  the  learners’  future  learning  endeavours  and learning success that the e‐learning experience is a positive one. Lee (2010) shows that user satisfaction  is  the  prime  indicator  of  the  user’s  probability  of  trying  e‐learning  again. Perceived  usefulness,  attitude  and  concentration  also  influence  future  e‐learning  efforts. Lee  (2010)  recommends  that  full  use  of  the  Internet’s  multimedia  capabilities  and collaborative tools should be made in order to encourage learners’ e‐learning experiences. Lee (2010) also notes that learning should be creative, and fun to facilitate flow. Paechter et al.  (2010)  researched  learners’  expectations  and  experiences  of  e‐learning  and  found  that the learners’ own achievement goals were the best predictors of success while the learners’ evaluation  of  the  teacher’s  skills  and  support  influenced  learning  and  satisfaction.  Their results highlight the importance of student instructions and teacher training. 1.2.9  Yukselturk  &  Bulut  (2007)  found  that  successful  e‐learners  often  use  self‐regulated learning strategies. Some research also discovered that learners, who have an internal locus of  control,  i.e.  take  personal  responsibility,  may  succeed  in  distance  learning 22.  The importance  of  self‐regulation  is  explained  by  the  contemporary  goal  of  educating independent  and  self‐regulated  learners.  Self‐regulated  learners  attempt  to  control  their behaviour; to accomplish a goal and; master their learning 23. In the research by Yukselturk & Bulut  (2007)  intrinsic  goal  orientation,  task  value,  self‐efficacy,  cognitive‐strategy  use,  and self‐regulation  were  significantly  positively  correlated  with  online  success.  According  to Yukselturk  &  Bulut  (2007)  the  link  between  learning  styles  and  learning  success  are conflicting  but  motivation  is  crucial.  The  reasons  behind  failing  to  complete  an  e‐learning course  lie  in  the  learners’  personal  lives  and  unrealistic  expectations  of  the  workload. Research has shown that the learners’ motivation often decreased during the course.1.2.10  Yukselturk  &  Bulut  (2007)  recommend  that  the  following  factors  be  acknowledged when creating online courses:  Provide learners with information on online learning and its requirements  Provide an environment where learners are encouraged to be self‐regulated  Give guidance on different environments and learning methods  Make sure the learners have access to support and instruction all through the course  Monitor performance regularly and provide relevant feedback  Encourage interaction between peer learners and delivery staff Check that the course contents have immediate real‐life value for the learners  Assemble the course content of media rich and up to date materials Concannon  et  al.  (2005)  studied  what  learners  feel  are  the  benefits  of  e‐learning.  They report that even individual learners approach to ICT‐supported learning varies depending on context. Learners valued peer encouragement and lecturer support in e‐learning. 21  see Concannon et al., 2005 22  Dille & Mezak, 1991; Parker, 1999; Stone, 1992 all in Yukselturk & Bulut 2007  23  Yukselturk & Bulut 2007  15
  • 16.  They were also happy with ease of access to resources. Negative feelings arose mainly from technical challenges. Concannon et al. (2005) also found that learners approach e‐learning just like traditional learning but consider Internet as an addition resource.  However, e‐learning is changing the way learners perform learning tasks. Learners can for example first browse demonstrations at their own pace and continuously edit their learning style as they learn. Shee & Wang (2008) found that learners ranked the user interface as the primary  decision  criteria  in  e‐learning.  Interaction  mostly  takes  place  in  the  user  interface and  a  stable,  well‐designed  interface  becomes  crucial  in  determining  learner  satisfaction. Shee  &  Wang  (2008)  remind  developers  to  pay  attention  to  the  learner  requirements  in designing  learner  interfaces.  Perhaps  surprisingly  the  second  priority  for  learners  asked about  their  e‐learning  decision  was  the  quality  of  the  content.  Therefore  great  emphasis should be put on this area perhaps more than other technical issues. The expertise of many professions  should  be  exploited  to  support  the  creation  of  materials  which  are  easily understood  but  also  contain  sufficient  rigour  to  ensure  the  quality  of  the  learning experience while being easy to find the data required.1.2.11  In  web‐based  e‐learning  the  learner’s  level  of  experience  in  using  the  Internet  can affect  the  search  results  which  may  lead  to  different  levels  of  quality  in  the  information available to novice and experienced users 24. The inevitable drop outs from e‐learning have been attributed to time or rather the lack of it and a number of other factors some common to traditional learners:  dedication to the course  external distractions (family‐life)  difficult materials   lack of social support  (see Williams et al. 2005). Less educated learners tend to be less positive towards e‐learning (Harun,  2002).  This  means  that  the  risk  of  e‐learning  for  the  student  from  this  sort  of background  is  in  the  illusion  that  e‐learning  would  replace  all  other  forms  of  learning  and learners  could  skip  opportunities  for  face‐to‐face  contact  (see  Demetriadis  &  Pombortsis, 2007). Learners have in some e‐learning instances also felt alienated, lonely and frustrated (see Williams et al. 2005; Harun, 2002). This can be addressed by the provision of support via e‐means using on‐line conferencing systems and conventional communications like the telephone and peer groups. Poor quality of transmissions can highlight feelings of alienation where the learner does not who to turn to for support. Harun (2002) states that high quality learning  best  takes  place  in  an  environment  characterised  by  a  combination  of  high challenge but low threat.  1.2.12  Yukselturk  &  Bulut  (2007)  have  done  qualitative  research  on  e‐learning  instructors. The  instructors  they  interviewed  felt  that  online  learners  were  different  from  traditional learners:  generally  they  were  older,  had  diverse  backgrounds  and  various  responsibilities. The  instructors  felt  that  successful  learners  were  self  disciplined,  active,  collaborative  and aware  of  their  responsibilities.  According  to  the  instructors  the  learners’  satisfaction  with the course was linked to how quickly they were able to implement what they had learned  24  Wu & Tsai, 2007  16
  • 17.  and  how  immediately  relevant  the  learning  had  been.  Instructors  also  felt  that  learners greatly  favoured  practical  information  i.e.  how  things  work  rather  than  theoretical information.  The  instructors  also  saw  flexibility  as  a  challenge  since  it  placed  a  lot  of responsibility  on  the  learners  and  caused  some  learners  to  fall  behind.  Designing  and implementing online courses wasn’t easy for the instructors either, as they have to update content  and  familiarize  themselves  with  new  tools  and  techniques.  The  instructors  saw communication tools as essential in interactive knowledge creation.1.2.13 The teacher’s challenge in e‐learning is creating coherent, structured and technically well designed learning material which also facilitates collaboration 25. Blended learning also challenges the teacher to combine the best practices of both methods. The e‐learning media facilitate  different  kinds  of  interactions  than  traditional  courses:  the  learners  can  be instructed to amend texts with their own point of view; find relevant information and links, discuss  content  on  relevant  forums;  use  and  explore  learning  software  (math,  languages, music  etc.),  carry  out  research  relevant  to  them;  create  content  in  Wikipedia  and  find content in online encyclopaedias etc. Even though learners are in control in the e‐learning context, support still needs to be provided. McLoughlin 26  also remarks that material should be  designed  to  engage  learners  and  the  role  of  the  instructor  is  to  offer  perspectives, support and in some cases mentoring.1.2.14 There is a growing trend for instructors and delivers of e‐learning to take advantage of  on‐line  support  mechanisms  like  communities  of  practice.  These  are  usually  virtual communities  often  referred  to  in  the  context  of  social  media  in  learning.  Communities  of practice are usually people who share an interest or a profession or a particular specialism. These  groups  naturally  or  through  organized  steps  share  knowledge  both  on  line  and  by other means. People in a community of practice learn from each other and become better professionals  in  their  field  through  this  joint  learning.  The  community  of  practice  theory includes the notion of stimulation by the social context: passive observers gradually become active participants 27. From the community of practice perspective, the role of the teacher is not  superior  to  the  role  of  the  student  but  all  members  learn  from  each  other  although experienced  members  are  respected  for  their  extensive  knowledge  of  the  community’s speciality.1.3 E‐learning and Business “The lack of modern ICT infrastructure (telephone, mobile and broadband) in too much of rural  England  was  one  of  the  strongest  messages  we  heard  from  rural  businesses  and communities  over  the  last  year.  Rural  businesses  need  effective  infrastructure  to  be successful and to realise their potential and to contribute to national economic growth.” 28  25  Paechter, 2010 26  2000 in Ladyshewsky, 2004 27  see Wenger, 1998 28  UK Commission for Rural Communities ‐ Agenda for Change: Releasing the Economic Potential of England’s Rural Areas, 7 Sep 2010.  17
  • 18.   Case Study 4: Community Project Solution ‐ Northlew  The village of Northlew in Devon is an isolated and ancient community close to Dartmoor National  Park.  Northlew  is  a  significant  distance  from  any  major  public  transport connection and 8 miles from the nearest trunk road. This isolation has until recently been a significant barrier to anyone within the village trying to access the internet. Dialup access had  been  available  for  a  number  of  years  but  getting  BT  or  any  other  ISP  interested  in addressing the needs of a small community like Northlew had proved impossible.   The  solution  was  for  the  community  to  establish  its  own  community  interest  company which  later  led  to  the  creation  of  a  not  for  profit  organisation  known  as  West  Coast Broadband.  The  community  led  by  an  experienced  IT  professional  first  considered  laying their  own  fibre  optic  cable,  whilst  this  would  have  solved  the  problem  the  cost  was prohibitive.  The  solution  was  to  develop  and  install  a  microwave  connection  from  the nearest BT exchange backed up by the installation of the necessary fibre optics. From early 2010  the  community  has  had  a  central  point  of  connection  on  a  high  point  outside  the village with line of sight connections to over 200 local subscribers. Connections speeds were initially  between  2MBS  and  4MBS,  however  as  the  system  becomes  better  resourced, speeds  of  up  to  100MBS  will  be  possible.  This  model  is  now  being  replicated  in  other isolated  communities  in  the  area  by  the  company  and  latterly  the  national  infrastructure organisation BT (British Telecom) themselves.  1.3.1 With any increased demand for lifelong learning/learning within the workplace there is also  an  increase  in  competition  between  businesses  offering  these  educational opportunities. There is always pressure to rethink how content is delivered. Concannon et al.  (2005)  write  that  reward  structures,  lab  times,  content  design,  computer  access  and technical support affect how learners perceive the quality of e‐learning and are issues that organizations  can  influence.  However,  one  other  key  factor  is  the  perception  that  any  e‐learning materials are   directly relevant to the needs of the learner.Sambrook (2003) has studied e‐learning in rural SMEs and concluded that successful use of e‐learning  requires  a  positive  attitude  from  both  the  learners  and  the  employers.  Online courses  have  been found to be effective only when educational providers and enterprises truly cooperate on both the learning content and the delivery method. Sambrook remarks that rural SMEs represent the majority of European businesses and provide most of the jobs as  well  as  turnover.  What  is  characteristic  for  SMEs  is  that  they  focus  on  the  informal transfer  of  job  skills  rather  than  formal  training.  Time  and  lack  of  relevant  provision  are typical barriers to SME training. Lifelong learning requires that also the employees of SMEs invest in learning. E‐learning can help overcome issues of time deficiency and remoteness.1.3.2  Work‐related  learning  usually  consists  of  learning  outside  the  workplace  (related  to the  workplace  but  takes  place  elsewhere),  on  the  job  training  at  work  (informal  learning) and  on  the  job  training  related  to  the  completion  of  qualifications  (learning  from  work  18
  • 19.  processes) 29. One long established challenge for SMEs is finding enough monetary resources to  support  the  required  technology  and  software.  Sambrook  (2003)  also  identified  the following  problems  with  SMEs  ability  to  embrace  e‐learning:  lack  of  hardware,  lack  of  e‐learning expertise, lack of time, lack of resources, lack of trust, difficulty in determining the full  cost  of  e‐learning.  Difficulty  in  determining  e‐learning  costs  is  particularly  noteworthy since it differentiates business clients from private consumers for whom the costs are often clearly  stated  and  packaged.  Sambrook  (2003)  listed  factors  learners  commonly  associate with SME‐relevant e‐learning material:  User friendly: material easy to use, clear instructions  Presentation: technically accurate, no errors  Graphics: number and quality of images  Interest: interesting or boring content  Information: amount and quality of content  Knowledge: new knowledge  Understanding: easy or difficult material  Level: appropriateness  Type of learning  Language  The balance of text and graphics 1.3.3  Whilst  Harun  (2002)  notes  that  significant  parts  of  the  e‐learning  process  can  take place in the workplace. The demands of the knowledge economy also require that people constantly  obtain,  assimilate  and  apply  knowledge  as  well  as  developing  their  capacity  to learn. Learning within the workplace is essential for both the employee and the employer. The strength of learning organizations is their ability to constantly update their work‐related training  and  processes  from  updating  skills  to  obtaining  product  information,  knowledge and new employee orientation. The quantity of information available from electronic means i.e. the Internet is constantly expanding at an exponential rate; this requires workers to be adept  at  using  and  evaluating  it.  The  new  communities  of  practice,  accessible  also internationally  and  online,  are  becoming  significant  networks  of  informal  learning.  Brown (2003) argues that there is a need to enable learners to find existing knowledge, integrate this knowledge in their work and share it with others. Brown also notes that e‐learning with its rich interaction opportunities is probably the only tool able to keep up with the rate of change. 29  Sambrook, 2003  19
  • 20.  PART 2. THE E‐LEARNING MARKET 2.1 Introduction 2.1.1 Rural areas cover a fifth of the EU area but only 25% of the population lives in rural settings 30.  These  areas  are  faced  with  many  problems:  cost  competition,  outmigration leading to an ageing population, widely dispersed settlements, lack of proximity to support services and lack of employment opportunities 31. It has long been held that the viability of rural  areas  could  be  enhanced  significantly  by  the  embedding  of  the  benefits  of  the information  society  which  would  require  significant  economic  diversification  into  the information society with a focus on rural strengths:  a healthy pollution free environment  consumer and food products of high quality  space for activities  maintaining cultural traditions2.1.2  The  notion  of  distance  has  considerably  changed  due  to  new  telecommunication technologies 32 accessibility to e‐learning for those in rural areas may actually result in better access  to  learning  since  they  no  longer  need  to  travel  to  find  quality  education opportunities.  The  research  carried  out  in  the  partner  countries  revealed  much  valuable information  on  both  the  similarities  and  differences  of  approach  and  the  problems  of broadband access experienced by those in rural areas. The e‐ruralnet partnership collected information  on  rural  e‐learning  through  online  questionnaires  addressing  providers  of  e‐learning; and through a series of case studies on best practice. There are full details of the research and relevant case studies form each partner country on the e‐ruralnet website. There is of course not the space to present an extensive digest of the research results within this report. However, there are some key results to emerge from the research,  largely  from  questions  which  focused  on  access  and  delivery  capability  of  e‐learning.  2.2 Access to and delivery of e‐learning 2.2.1  According  to  the  results  of  the  e‐ruralnet  research 33,  the  main  problems  associated with  e‐learning  especially  in  rural  areas  fall  into  7  categories,  as  listed  below.  These  are ranked according to importance for providers, across the sample (1: the greatest number of providers endorsed this problem, 7 the smallest number endorsed) as follows:  1. No suitable infrastructure  2. IT illiteracy  3. Limited financial capacity 30  EU, 2003 31 , 32      see Farrell & Lukesch, 1998  33  visit www.e‐ruralnet.eu  20
  • 21.   4. No support staff in rural areas  5. No public funding available  6. No suitable training course  7. Other The  lack  of  suitable  infrastructure  and  IT  illiteracy  were  featuring  as  top  choices  in  most countries,  confirming  the  importance  of  ensuring  access  to  computers  and  internet  for learners, even in the present day. 2.2.2 Providers’ expectations from successful e‐students showed a steady trend across the sample: Willingness to Learn was the student’s trait most valued by providers, followed by Self  Discipline  and  Perseverance.  Time  availability  and  critical  thinking  were  rated  as important  by  fewer  providers.  These  responses  illustrate  that  the  problems  and  traits common to e‐learning are universal with little or no difference between those learners who live in a rural area and those from an urban area 2.2.3 Providers were asked if they target specifically rural areas. On the whole, one in three providers  target  rural  areas  specifically.  However  this  proportion  is  much  higher  in  some countries  (UK,  Estonia)  and  much  lower  in  other  (Germany,  Portugal).  It  is  though encouraging  that  in  all  surveyed  countries,  a  smaller  or  larger  proportion  of  providers, ranging from 15% to 67%, have recognised the need to address the learning needs of rural residents more specifically. 2.2.4  The  specialisation  of  providers  regarding  e‐learning  provision  was  assessed  on  the basis of the percentage of providers’ total training output being IT‐supported courses. For the total sample, about half had a very low specialisation (less that 20% of output being IT‐supported)  while  only  one  in  five  were  highly  specialised  (over  80%  of  output  being  IT‐supported).  Countries  that  were  shown  to  have  the  largest  segments  of  specialised  e‐learning markets included the UK, Sweden, Italy and Poland (around one in three providers).  2.2.5  In  terms  of  the  delivery  mechanisms  for  e‐learning,  respondents  were  asked  what types of methods they used in distance learning and were given the following choices:  E‐learning platforms  Websites for downloading materials  Video DVDs/CDs   Television programmes   Radio programmes  Mobile phones  OtherThe most common choice was e‐Learning platforms with 80% of all respondents, across the surveyed countries, confirming their use. Websites for downloading material and DVDs/CDs have been proved also popular, with negligible numbers admitting use of TV or radio and an average 8% reporting use of mobile phones. Mobile phones are however in much wider use in Finland and Sweden, where their use is reported by 20‐30% of providers.  21
  • 22.  2.2.6  Most  providers  used  a  diversity  of  tools,  the  popularity  of  which  across  the  sample appears below (1 is the most popular tool and 9 the least popular):  1. E‐mails  2. Discussion groups  3. Chat rooms  4. Videoconferencing  5. E‐learning communities  6. Wikis  7. Blogs  8. podcasts  9. OtherThe  use  of  different  tools  differed  between  countries,  underlying  to  a  certain  extent  the level of development of IT and the learning culture in the country. For example, e‐learning communities  seem  to  be  more  popular  in  Sweden  and  Italy;  videoconferencing  is  more popular  in  Greece,  Finland  and  Sweden;  blogs  are  more  popular  in  Estonia  and  Spain, compared  to  other  countries.  However,  in  all  countries  the  e‐learning  providers  use  a diversity  of  tools,  although  in  some  countries  this  diversity  is  wider  (e.g.  Sweden)  and  in some countries narrower (e.g. UK, Hungary).  2.2.7 The conclusion which can be drawn from the research is that is that in all participating countries e‐learning providers are experiencing the same problems, in different proportions certainly; share similar delivery methods and learning tools, although in different mixes; and their expectations from students are built along comparable lines. The research underlines much commonality of problems and solutions across the respondent countries, keeping in mind  that  different  learning  cultures,  education  systems  and  IT  development  influence greatly the way the e‐learning supply functions; while they determine important factors of the market such as providers’ specialisation, their targeting of rural areas and the dynamics of the market itself to respond to the changing needs of learners. 2.3 Challenges associated with rural e‐learning2.3.1 Many e‐learning providers did not have products specifically designed for rural areas but  felt  that  their  products  could  be  equally  useful  in  both  rural  and  urban  areas.  The challenges identified through these interviews associated with rural e‐learning were:  Poor capacity/quality internet connection  Geographical distance to tutors  Lack of technical assistance  Cost of broadband  Increasing complexity of common forms of ICT  The need to constantly update user technology/software can form a barrier to effective  rural e‐learning.  22
  • 23.   Semi‐rural  areas  close  to  urban  centres  can  experience  problems  with  ICT/broadband  infrastructure.  Some  businesses  interviewed  feared  that  the  current  gap  in  access  speeds  between  urban and rural areas would increase instead of progressing to a more equal direction.  There was optimism regarding e‐learning with the education providers. According to one  interviewee,  the  recipe  for  promoting  e‐learning  in  rural  areas  is  to  fix  the  technology  and provide content and interaction.   Case Study: Cross Communities Solution ‐ Cybermoor Project   Cybermoor was the first rural broadband co‐operative in England, based in Alston a market town in Cumbria, England. Alston is the highest market town in the UK as it is located among the Pennine Hills its isolated location is roughly equidistant (30+miles) from the cities of Newcastle on Tyne and Carlisle. Cybermoor now provides broadband service  to  rural  communities  in  Cumbria,  Northumberland  and  Herefordshire.  In addition  it  operates  community  websites  connecting  together  the  geographically dispersed  residents  of  Alston  Moor,  providing  an  on‐line  forum  where  residents  can discuss local issues and benefit from travel text alerts etc.   The  most  recent  service  development  has  been  the  initiation  of  Telehealth  and Telemedicine  services.    Cybermoor  has  a  number  of  trading  activities  including  the sale of computer consumables, hire of equipment and consultancy for local authorities and  Government  agencies.  The  profit  from  these  activities  goes  towards  providing affordable  broadband  for  rural  residents.  Cybermoor  is  a  founder  member  of  the Community  Broadband  Network  which  supports  and  develops  community‐owned broadband  schemes  across  the  country  and  also  the  Independent  Networks  Co‐ operative  Association  (INCA)  which  supports  the  development  of  next  generation broadband initiatives by sharing expertise and information.  The  Cybermoor  project  launched  in  Alston,  Cumbria,  in  2001  with  funding  from  the “Wired  up  Communities”  a  UK  Government  initiative.  Line  of  sight  connection  was established to a redundant MOD facility with fibre optic connectivity; this was tapped into and distributed via a mast located on the local Community College and local line of sight connections and relays established over the next 2 years. In 2003, Cybermoor Ltd. was set up to move the project towards sustainability. Gradually connections to customers have been improved and in 2010 Cybermoor completed the installation of its own wireless backhaul connection over a distance of 40 miles with a capacity of up to 375 megabits per second. It now has the highest penetration of broadband in any rural area in England.     23
  • 24.  2.3.2  In  addition  to  the  e‐ruralnet  research,  the  literature  provides  some  examples  of further  challenges  associated  with  e‐learning.  An  important  challenge  associated  with  e‐learning  in  rural  areas  is  the  dominating  status  of  the  English  language 34  which  is  not  the native language for many learners. Many tools are designed with English user interfaces and English  language  content  dominates  the  Internet.  Depending  on  their  mother  tongue, learners in different areas of Europe may have access to very diverse material.  2.3.3  However,  the  major  challenge  for  rural  areas  is  Internet  connectivity,  as  discussed earlier. For example in their research paper Rural Broadband‐Why does it matter?  Ofcom the  UK  regulatory  authority  for  telecommunications  state  that  in  2008  “rural  consumers received average speeds 13% lower than their urban counterparts”. By 2010, Ofcom found the  average  download  speed  for  urban  consumers  was  over  twice  the  average  speed delivered to rural consumers (5.8Mbit/s compared to 2.7Mbit/s). Case Study: Transnational Solution – Hylas Satellite  One major possibility of a solution to the problems of broadband access in rural areas could  be  provided  by  the  recently  launched  HYLAS  satellite  (The  Highly  Adaptable Satellite). HYLAS has been part funded by the UK Space Agency and has been designed and built in the UK. This low‐cost satellite was launched by an Ariane 5 vehicle on 26th November  2010  and  will  potentially  serve  hundreds  of  thousands  of  Internet  users across  Europe.  HYLAS  uses  small  satellite  technology  to  help  solve  the  problem  of unequal  access  to  broadband  services.  The  satellite  is  named  after  it’s  highly adaptable’  payload,  which  when  fully  commissioned,  will  automatically  allocate varying amounts of power and bandwidth to the different regions within its footprint, reacting  to  the  highs  and  lows  of  traffic  demand.  This  means  that  between  150,000 and 300,000 users can access HYLAS at any one time with a target connection speed of 10mbps. Hylas will also facilitate the broadcast of a range of high definition television programmes. The satellite will cover rural areas of western and central Europe that are unlikely to receive any terrestrial broadband within the next ten years. The idea is for Internet  services  to  be  delivered  either  directly  to  customers  or  through  a  central terminal in a village and then fed out to a cluster of users in a local area via line of site connections  or  wireless  technology.  This  is  the  first  of  several  satellites  of  this  type from a number of suppliers covering not only Western Europe but also Africa and other areas of the world not supported by terrestrial broadband. 2.3.4 The advent of broadband connectivity lowers the barriers to learning for rural areas; currently  the  communications  services  provided  for  sparsely  inhabited  areas  in  many countries create a level of inequality between urban and rural citizens. An example of this inequality  is  the  access  to  government  information  and  the  compliance  with  government legislation  for  issues  like  stock  movements  and  tracking.  The  Internet  is  increasingly becoming  a  major  channel  for  government  information 35.  If  rural  areas  are  not  properly 34  see Kam et al., 2008 35 ,36    2004Sandberg et al.2004  24
  • 25.  addressed in this ongoing development, it may exacerbate existing regional inequalities for citizens.  If  rural  locations  can  be  secured  access  to  broadband,  the  development  would make a positive contribution to inclusivity and equality of access to services. For example, medical consultation provided via broadband connections 36. Although the statistic below is applicable to both rural and urban areas it is still the case that the UK has calculated that if just 3½% of unemployed non internet users found a job by getting online it would deliver a net economic benefit of £560 million.  2.3.5  Sandberg  et  al.  (2004)  point  out  that  any  improvement  to  connectivity  being implemented  in  urban  areas  to  facilitate  the  new  digital  knowledge  era  means  by comparison, less speed, lower quality and smaller capacity of Internet access for rural areas by  comparison  with  urban  areas.  These  disparities  affect  both  rural  economies  and  the quality of life of rural citizens since advanced digital communication is the norm for many now. Mason & Rennie (2004) state that broadband is essential for rural e‐learning since it is fast,  reliable  and  “always  on”.  They  also  note  that  e‐learning  is  typically  not  the  primary reason  for  setting  up  an  internet  connection;  rather  it  is  the  expected  benefits  for  rural communities  from  access  to  entertainment,  communications  and  shopping,  which  is  the greater  incentive.  Broadband  also  disrupts  other  family  member’s  use  of  the  internet  less than  slower  dial‐up  connections,  which  often  utilised  the  single  phone  line  disconnecting the  telephone  connection.  Broadband  enables  multiple  users  to  efficiently  use  the connection simultaneously. However, Payne (2007) argues that there are ICT‐affluent, well‐educated  rural  citizens  and  those  who  have  regular  access  to  urban  infrastructure.  Many people  now  commute  from  rural  to  urban  areas,  which  effectively  limit  their  level  of disadvantage in terms of access to broadband.  2.3.6 There are of course also those rural citizens who are dependent on their surroundings and have fewer possibilities for travelling, securing fast Internet access and finding suitable educational opportunities. With the advent of high tech agricultural equipment it could be argued that many rural citizens in developed countries are not employed directly by land‐based  industries,  although  a  considerable  proportion  may  be  indirectly  connected.  For learners  from  these  backgrounds  the  informal  side  of  e‐learning  is  as  important  as  the formal one as people also learn from leisure interests, their peers and random material 37.  2.3.7  Lack  of  access  to  good  quality  broadband  affects  people  in  many  different  ways. Arguably, we have reached a point where good quality broadband should be regarded as an additional  utility.  We  should  work  towards  ensuring that people have easy and affordable access to the internet in the same way they can access water, electricity or gas.” 38 The issue of  poor  capacity/quality  of  internet  connection  is  common  to  many rural areas within the EU  and  is  a  manifestation  of  the  restrictions  imposed  by  the  failure  of  some  countries  to update the main infrastructure over the last 20 years or so. This updating could then have had  its  additional  capacity  related  to  the  needs  of  rural  areas.  Typically  any  potential connection more than 5km from the nearest exchange/connection is beyond the range of conventional  ADSL  technology.  In  many  countries  this  situation  has  not  arisen  as  for whatever  reason  the  use  of  dial  up  technologies  has  been  bypassed  by  the  installation  of  37  Mason & Rennie, 2004 38   UK Manifesto for a Networked Nation  25
  • 26.  fibre optic systems as was the case with the city of Goteborg in the late 1990’s as outlined in the following Case Study.   Case Study: Regional/Province Wide Solution ‐ Broadband in Goteborg  In  1999  the  decision  was  taken  by  the  municipal  authorities  backed  up  by  the  national government of Sweden to install fibre optic systems to all consumers within the city and its large  rural hinterland which makes up the Province of Vastergotland and Bohusian which has a land area of 1,029Km2 and a population of 509,000. This development allowed the area  to  connect  to  similar  systems  being  planned  for  many  parts  of  Sweden.  The development while considered revolutionary in some respects did result in some anomalies. For  example  each  individual  address  was  connected  to  the  main  system  via  a  connection box  facilitating  100MBS  connection.  This  connection  speed  was  the  same  for  a  single residence, a block of apartments, an FE college with 40 computers, a university with 5,000 students  and  the  regional  headquarters  of  a  mobile  phone  company.  However,  this development did result in a rapid expansion in the re‐location of high tech industries to the area and the expansion of existing production facilities e.g. SAAB Cars Transmission Facility. One  example  of  the  advanced  use  of  technology possible  with  these  systems  as  early  as 2001,  was  the  ability  for  a  holiday  company  to  communicate  with  its  staff  and  carry  out training  and  monitor  its  complete  range  of  properties  via  web  cams  24  hours/day  the furthest property was located inside the Arctic Circle and was 800Kms from the companies’ base.    26
  • 27.  PART 3. ALTERNATIVE MEDIA 3.1 Study of the Typical Uses and Descriptors of Alternative media3.1.1 Web 2.0. Web  2.0  refers  to  second  generation  of  web  based  tools  which  are  now  the  norm  among learners and businesses. Before the development of these intuitive tools the Internet which used to be viewed as a source of information is now a place to meet people and share life. The  merits  of  the  Web  2.0  internet  are  freedom  and  low  cost.  Social  software  facilitates personal  sharing,  individual  publishing  and  consumer  based  production  of  content.  The attention  on  this  aspect  has  shifted  from  access  to  information  toward  access  to  people. People  participating  in  producing  content  are  no  longer  required  to  know  programming languages  but  are  able  to  use  Web2.0  applications  to  contribute  opinions  of  their  own  as well as share knowledge and ideas. Web 2.0 is accessible for all due to affordability, usability and new devices 39. Rollett et al. (2007) summarize Web 2.0 to be defined by a large number of  small  communities;  a  focus  on  high‐quality  content  rather  than  an  elaborate  interface; users adding value by creating content; network effects (the number of users make up the value  of  a  service);  new  user  rights;  beta  versions  of  tools;  cooperation  and  device‐independent software. The  buzz  behind  social  software  stems  from  the  social  construction  of  knowledge; understanding  is  formed  through  interaction  with  others.  The  internet  now  enables convenient  collaboration  and  thus,  “social  learning”.  The  internet  is  full  of  online communities of practice that foster participation in a community of specialists or a field of interest. Web 2.0 applications include  Blogs  Wikis Social networks (Facebook, Bebo etc)  Podcasts  Online office software  Tagging systems etc.  Devices are also being designed with Web 2.0 requirements central to their functionality by providing direct access to MySpace, Facebook and Windows Live from their mobile device as well  as  the  opportunity  to  send  unlimited  SMS  messages  and  upload  images  to  Flickr. Popular  Web  2.0  applications  include  Twitter,  Facebook,  MySpace,  YouTube,  and  Flickr. Maloney (2007) offers Web 2.0 applications as one solution to the missing innovativeness of former e‐learning. It changes how we process information. Web 2.0 allows users to connect information and share the new knowledge relationships with other users instantly. Maloney (2007)  also  points  out  that  learners  are  obviously  willing  to  invest  time  and  energy  in building relationships around common interests. Web 2.0 facilitates enormous amounts of informal learning. In the learning context, Ebner et al. (2007) note that ease of use is the key to successful Web 2.0 learning applications. They also argue that while current hardware is 39  see Ebner et al., 2007  27
  • 28.  adapted for e‐learning needs, usable interfaces are not. Learning in Web 2.0 still relies on the cognitive processes of the learner but the new social e‐learning context facilitates taking advantage of the social process of learning. Learners can interact with each other in addition to the teacher; the technology and the content 40. Ebner et al. (2007) recommend that the following things are paid attention to when designing Web 2.0 E‐learning:  community  feeling  (seeing  other  users),  search  functions,  data  collection  (links according to popularity) and ease of use.  Alternative media are by definition non‐mainstream media that; however, the distinction is rapidly becoming blurred with the adoption by learning organisations systems like Facebook and  Twitter  which  until  recently  were  firmly  regarded  as  alternative  media.  Of  course traditional media used in an alternative fashion can also be regarded as alternative media if used with new content, new looks or new target audiences: newspapers, radio, television, movies,  Internet  etc.  Atton  (2002)  states  that  alternative  media  provide  people  usually outside  media  production  the  opportunity  for  democratic  communication.  Alternative media  refers  to  power  in  relation  to  the  commercial  mass‐media  but  it  can  also  be understood  as  an  alternative  mode  or  production  or  distribution.  In  e‐learning  alternative media  can  be  used  to  refer  to  tools  and  devices  that  facilitate  e‐learning  via  different technology.  E‐learning  means  learning  using  ICT  and  alternative  media  in  ICT  are  usually devices other than personal computers.3.1.2 Stand‐alone The  use  of  stand‐alone  media  can  be  used  where  there  is  no  reasonable  prospect  of  a reliable  internet  connection  for  example  with  certain  workplaces.  The  use  of  unreliable internet connections is a common cause of learner frustration and can undermine learning efficiency 41.  The  delivery  mechanism  can  be  exactly  the  same  as  on‐line  learning  i.e.  a laptop computer or an internet enables mobile device except that modules are up‐loaded from  a  base  source  removing  the  need  to  rely  on  the  internet.  The  weak  point  with  non-online media is that it does not facilitate true two‐directional interaction or communication. The strength is its repeatability and reliability of access on demand. Learning material once stored can be copied, distributed and used again and again. However, the device has to be returned  to  base  for  completed  modules  to  be  removed  and  new  ones  loaded,  this  is  the only way of ensuring the content is current and can have oits own problems of consistency. Laptop and desktop computers can also be used to view material off line in the form of CD and  DVD  based  content,  listen  to  audio  material,  view  presentations,  write  and  calculate etc.3.1.3  Video  cassettes  and  DVD’s  can  be  used  to  display  pre-recorded  training  content  to learners at the class room or learning from a distance. Video content can present a recorded lecture or material such as graphs but it can also be a scripted show designed for learning. Also  entertainment  videos  can  be  used  for  educational  purposes:  TV  shows  from  other countries often display foreign cultures and may be used as exercise material for language learning.  The  strength  of  DVDs  is  their  high  quality  image  and  audio,  which  is  usually, requires  a  high  speed  connection  to  transmit  online.  Web‐linked  DVDs  enable  some 40  see Ebner et al., 2007 41   Thampuran et al., 2001  28
  • 29.  material  to  be  updated.  Stand‐alone  videos  can  also  be  viewed  multiple  times  as  many times as the learner requires and in any place.3.1.4  Audio  material  is  extensively  used  in  language  training.  Audio  storage  formats  (CDs, mp3‐players) are relevantly cheap, user‐friendly and cost‐efficient. Audio content is easy to transport and listen to anywhere but the lack of visual content usually requires some kind of support material to be used such as documents, books or notes. Audio training material also needs  to  be  carefully  designed  to  make  the  structure  easy  to  follow  for  users.  Electronic books  may  also  be  in  audio  format  enabling  people  to  learn  while  engaged  in  other  tasks such as driving or sports.3.1.5  E‐books  are  becoming  increasingly  popular  with  portable  reading  devices  designed particularly  for  e-books.  Also  contemporary  media  content  such  as  newspapers  and magazines can be read with e‐book readers. E‐books can be configured to utilise any of the following attributes  42  enable linking of like locations  nonlinearity  data density  end user customizability (text size, audio option)  easy distribution  low costs  searchability (key word etc)  multimedia features  What makes e‐books attractive for e‐learning is their ability to carry enormous amounts of text and images and still be easily updated and taken to remote locations. Modern e‐book readers are also easy to carry anywhere and are more convenient to use for reading even at home than a laptop and have longer battery life than the typical laptop. There is still a tendency among many late adopted of ICT to print communications and other material like electronic texts. Large amounts of print‐outs can be tedious to carry and much more user‐friendly to transport in electronic format. Advanced e‐book readers also facilitate highlighting, which is one learning technique often adopted by learners learning from a text. The barriers to e‐book use include battery life although this is rapidly improving, price and lack of functionality of some readers 43.3.1.6 Flexbooks Flexbooks  are  a  new  model  of  textbook  creation.  Through  the  electronic  Flexbooks  tools teachers  and  learners  can  create  custom  textbooks  and  use  open  source  information  as content.  While  traditional  textbooks  are  expensive  and  quickly  out‐dated,  Flexbooks  can offer high quality content by top experts specifically designed for the target group’s needs and context. Flexbooks are also expected to support collaborative learning via a community of  authors,  publishers  and  commentators.  The  format  of  Flexbooks  creation  essentially 42  Shiratuddin, Hassan, & Landoni, 2003 in Buzzetto‐More et al., 2007 43  Wilson, 2003 in Buzzetto‐More et al., 2007  29
  • 30.  combines  e‐learning  (editing  content)  and  traditional  learning  (books  and  face‐to‐face contact).3.1.7 Online The  strength  of  online  e‐learning  is  that  is  allows  all  parties  to  participate  in  knowledge production 44.  Network  connections  offer  learners  access  to  multimedia,  skill  assessments, support materials and online communication 45. Many online tools are the same as the ones used in stand‐alone devices but an internet connection enables updated content and real‐time  communication 46.  The  challenges  with  online  content  often  arise  from  bandwidth which should be broad enough to permit streaming video and such. Web‐based  learning  requires  sufficient  effort:  time  to  develop  appropriate  courses  and learn the technology, resources for training and attention to monitoring online learning 47. 3.1.8 VLC’s Yang  (2007)  unfolds  the  secrets  of  virtual  learning  communities  (VLC’s).  Since  the introduction  of  the  supporting  software  VLC’s  have  proliferated  on  the  internet  the  vast majority  of  which  facilitate  collaborative  e‐learning.  The  challenge  with  them  is  finding verifiable  quality  knowledge  and  trustworthy  partners.  Trust  can  refer  to  many  things: infrastructure  (software,  hardware),  understanding,  and  policy  (rules).  VLC’s  host  both explicit (visible, readily available) and implicit content (available via networking).  3.1.9  Wikis  are  websites  that  users  can  edit.  Ruth  &  Houghton  (2009)  argue  that  Wikis foster egalitarian learning and enable challenging, collaborative learning. Wikis facilitate the joint  construction  of  knowledge  and  allow  editor‐learners  to  understand  the  issues  at  a deeper  level.  Creating  Wikis  forces  learners  to  think  about  the  linkages  of  the  subject content  with  other  areas  on  knowledge.  In  addition  to  fostering  the  building  of  complex mental  constructs,  participating  in  Wikis  lets  learners  see  how  their  peers  perceive  the subject  fostering  greater  understanding  of  alternative  viewpoints.  Wikis  are  also  useful  in learning  as  databanks,  the  collective  accumulation  of  knowledge  is  apparent  in  Wikis created over time by multiple users. Wikis are about more than delivering information; they utilize the Internet context to co‐construct knowledge. The philosophy of Wikis also includes the  key  element  that  everyone  can  criticize  entered  information  and  that  all  editors  are responsible (as in ready to defend) for the content they contributed in this way authority is truly shared and the learning rests entirely with the learner. Wikis around a certain topic can be viewed as electronic communities of practice: “Wikis blur the definition of both novice and  expert  as  expertise  is  developed  and  constructed  as  part  of  the  process” 48.  Ruth  & Houghton (2009) point out that Wikis can also disrupt power hierarchies. In Wikis there is less  risk  that  prominent  contributors’  views  can  gain  disproportionate  weight  due  to  their social  status.  Fundamentally  Wikis  are  designed  to  increase  levels  of  collaboration  rather than levels of competition. 44  http://www.wikinomics.com/blog/index.php/2008/02/14/flexbooks‐a‐wikinomics‐approach‐to‐education 45  see Gunasekaran et al., 2002 46  http://www.ck12.org/flexr 47  see Williams et al., 2005 48  Ruth & Houghton, 2009  30
  • 31.  3.1.10  PodCasts  are  audio/video  clips  stored  in  digital  format  and  shared  over  the  web 49. Within  formal  education,  there  are  teaching  podcasts  that  discuss  learning  challenges, subject content podcasts that deal with a certain subject topics and exercise podcasts that facilitate  certain  training  (i.e.  languages,  music,  arts).  Podcasting  software  allows users/listeners/learners  to  subscribe  to  podcast  transmissions  and  the  software automatically  downloads  the  latest  podcasts  onto  the  users  own  audio  device  (often  an MP3  or  MP4‐player).  Audio  podcasts  include  sound  whereas  enhanced  podcasts  can  also have images and chapter markers. Video podcasts are usually produced in a common movie format like i.e. a .wlv file. The  strength  of  podcasts  in  education  is  convenience;  podcasts  are  easy  to  listen  to anywhere, anytime without advanced technical know‐how 50. Numerous learners of all ages already  carry  audio  players  (mp3/4‐players,  PDAs,  Notebook  laptops,  internet  enabled mobile phones etc.) with them everywhere so the devices for consuming audio e‐learning are already at hand. Many learners prefer listening to reading therefore Podcasts better suit their  learning  style  as  compared  to  reading.  E‐learning  in  podcasts  can  be  mixed  with entertainment  content  so  that  listening  remains  interesting  thus  building  engagement between the learner and the subject. Learners can also create podcasts of their own with audio  recording  devices.  Many  portable  audio  devices  are  also  equipped  with  recording functions. When  creating  an  educational  podcast,  attention  should  be  paid  especially  to  the  quality and structure of the material. The tempo and tone of speech should be enjoyable to listen to and the clips should be short enough to retain attention compared to for example a radio programme.  The  file  size  should  also  be  kept  as  small  as  possible  so  that  their  use  is optimised for portable devices. Portable audio devices are not limited to portable access to for example updated content. They can be used for field recording (study projects, evidence gathering, interviews, data collection, learning support (repetition, recording feedback and discussions) and content storage. 513.1.11 Blogs are online diaries or personal/communal publishing forums. Bloggers can post text,  pictures,  link  and  videos  to  their  blogs  which  they  are  expected  to  update  regularly. Readers  in turn can comment on posts. Blogs are web‐based communications tools which are  usually  quite  easy  to  create  with  blog  applications  designed  to  host  personal  blogs. Numerous blog search sites also help readers find blogs catering to their interests. Blogs can reach  a  wide  audience  through  tagging  and  linking.  In  education,  blogs  can  be  used  as learning  portfolios  that  allow  learners  to  reflect  on  their  opinions  by  the  comments  from other learners. Blogs are especially successful in promoting discussions. 3.1.12 Mobile phonesMobile  phones  can  be  used  to  access  online  learning  resources  such  as  web‐links,  help guides,  forums  and  downloadable  material.  According  to  Attewell  (2005)  mobile  learning fosters both independent and collaborative learning. It helps learners improve their literacy, identify areas where they need support and raise their self‐esteem and self confidence. 49  typically via RSS/ Really Simple Syndication protocol 50  Cebeci & Tekdal, 2006 51  A database of educational podcasts: http://www.podcastalley.com/podcast_genres.php?pod_genre_id=7  31
  • 32.  He  continues  to  state  that  mobile  learning  can  diminish  the  formality  of  learning  and combat ICT resistance. In Peters’ (2007) paper, education providers say that mobile phones are mostly used to SMS learners reminders and attendance notifications. The providers also note that m‐learning is ideally suited for adult learners since it allows a much quicker response than even e‐mail.M‐learning  refers  to  mobile  learning  i.e.  learning  that  takes  place  via  portable,  electronic devices.  Mobile  devices  enable  people  to  learn  wherever  they  are  and  also  employees  to access information when they need it. Traditional telephones are typically used for one‐on‐one communication which demands time and commitment from the instructor but can be useful for the learner receiving full attention and being able to clarify all unclear issues at once. Telephones can also be used for teleconferencing which allows many people to join in an  audio  discussion.  Mobile  phones  frequently  have  multiple  features  apart  from transmitting  voice.  Mobile  learning  takes  the  flexibility  of  online  learning  one  step  further than desktop computers or even laptops. Learning can truly be done anywhere and all spare time can be taken advantage of. The  number  of  mobile  phones  already  exceeds  the  number  of  personal  computers 52  and many  experts  estimate  that  mobile  devices  will  bypass  computers  as  the  devices  for electronic communication, internet access and work. Mobile phones already have many of the  functions  that  computers  do,  providing  users  with  text/picture/video  editing applications, calculators, audio content and access to internet materials. In learning, mobile devices  facilitate  wireless  transfer  of  data  and  host  multiple  possibilities  for  social interaction. M‐learning provides an opportunity to maximize the benefits of e‐learning and optimize the interaction elements of training. M‐learning also extends the target group of learners  to  those  who  are  constantly  moving 53.  Especially  to  those  in  rural  areas,  these learners are not just away from the training businesses but in new locations all the time. M‐learning  also  enables  learners  to  access information at the precise moments they need it. Devices designed for mobile use are also much more convenient to carry than for example a laptop,  which  is  not  optimized  for  convenient  size  and  weight.  Whereas  traditional telephones  and  basic  mobiles were used to talk and SMS (Short Message Service), mobile phones can be used for many useful contributions to daily life and learning like diverse time management and communication functions.  Mobile devices are also better equipped to transmit audio than computers and they deliver synchronous  audio  more  easily  and  less  expensively  than  online  technologies 54.  QWERTY‐keyboards facilitate fast typing or texting. Mobile learning develops the learners’ technology skills  in  addition  to  the  content  knowledge  almost  without  the  user  realising.  Although mobile  devices  can  often  present  the  same  content  as  laptops,  the  smaller  screen  and keyboard pose significant challenges for long term use especially for those with disabilities. In  addition  to  the  challenges  of  image  resizing,  the  connection  speed  and  processing capabilities of m‐devices can raise usability problems for the average user 55. Mobile phones 52  Attewell, 2005 53, 50  Brown, 2003  55,52 , 53 see Trifonova & Ronchetti, 2003  32
  • 33.  can be used to access online learning resources such as web‐links, help guides, forums and downloadable material. According  to  Attewell  (2005)  mobile  learning  fosters  both  independent  and  collaborative learning. It helps learners improve their literacy, identify areas where they need support and raise their self‐esteem and self confidence. He continues to state that mobile learning can diminish  the  formality  of  learning  and  combat  ICT  resistance.  In  Peters’  (2007)  paper, education providers say that mobile phones are mostly used to SMS learners reminders and attendance notifications. The providers also note that m‐learning is ideally suited for adult learners since it allows a much quicker response than even e‐mail.PDAs  (Personal  digital  assistant  e.g.  Palmtop  computer)  are  usually  but  not  exclusively mobile phones that manage digital information. PDAs can often be used for connecting to the internet although tools such as calculators, books, organizers and word processors can also  be  loaded  on  the  PDA.  The  key  feature  of  PDAs  is  that  they  are  effortless  to  take anywhere and thus learning is no longer tied to heavy equipment that needs to be packed and moved from place to place. PDAs enable learners to both interact and access content 56. Smørdal  &  Gregory  (2002)  regard  PDAs  as  “gateways  in  complicated  webs  of interdependent technical and social networks” rather than digital assistants since they are mostly used for various communication purposes. Smørdal & Gregory (2002) found out that learners using a PDA in learning often had difficulty in working across different applications, which can limit the use of the PDA compared to other digital devices or traditional material.There  are  still  many  areas  where  bandwidth  is  not  yet  reliable  or  advanced  enough  to support  online  learning  and  standalone  e‐learning  materials  are  more  convenient  for learners.  Trifonova  &  Ronchetti  (2003)  label  different  online  status  modes  as  “pure connection“ (always online), “pure mobility” (no connection) and a mixture of these two. In addition to disconnection issues, the price of online access can form a barrier to online use and learners may prefer to use the mobile device in offline mode. M‐learning should take this  into  account  by  providing  downloadable  content  to  be  used  offline  with  the  learners’ mobile  device.  Caching  and  synchronizing  in  general  can  be  problematic  with  all  mobile devices 57.  However,  there are several on‐line utilities which now simplify this to the point where the learner ceases to notice. One other solution for this is separating the data into small,  downloadable  packages  for  using  offline.  Trifonova  &  Ronchetti  (2003)  recommend that m‐learning courses be in short modules so the learners can take advantage of the time fragments  they  have  while  on‐the‐go.  This  technique  also  allows  the  modules to be down loaded while the learner moves around in their daily life moving from a location with a poor connection to one with perhaps 3G. Small modules also promote simple and fun m‐learning activities  to  nurture  engagement.  M‐learning  should  be  possible  without  reading  a  users’ guide  and  should  take  into  account  the  fact  that  people  use  it  in  a  very  different  context from traditional distance learning.  The  challenge  with  mobile  devices  in  learning  is  that  the  applications  often  need  to  be programmed for the particular operating system which implies costs for either the provider (taking  into  consideration  all  possible  systems  the  learners  use)  or  the  learners  (having  to buy particular technology). Applications designed for PC’s aren’t directly convertible into a    33
  • 34.  mobile  format  without  consideration  to  how  the  mobile  setting  affects  usability.  Mobile devices can be complex even for experienced users and tutor support is often required for the  efficient  delivery  of  mobile  learning.  Mobile  devices  in  some  areas  are  expected  to become the primary devices for accessing the Internet and the learning content it provides. The  challenges  are  screen  sizes,  keyboard  size  (affecting  text  input  speed),  amount  of memory,  battery  life,  applications  designed  specifically  for  portable  devices,  displaying varying multi‐media formats and cost. 1:  Design  short  modules  that  the  learners  can  use  for  short  bursts  of  learning among their other life tasks. 2:   Make the experience fun and simple since the size of the display on mobile devices are not always well designed for complex content.  3:  With online applications, ensure that data is stored concurrently in case the connection to the user is lost.  4:  With  both  offline  content  and  web  based  mobile  content,  package  it  into small, easily downloadable parts.  5:  Provide downloadable content that can be easily saved on a portable device. 6:  Make sure the file sizes are reasonable and thus affordable for the learner.  3.2  Learning by Gaming & Simulations 3.2.1 Learning Games Games  are  used  for  other  than  entertainment,  in  the  educational  context  for  engaging learners and for addressing specific learning needs. Learning by gaming can be fun but the primary  aim  is  to  teach  certain  content.  They  provide  learners  with  an  opportunity  to practice skills needed in the real world 58. Learning by gaming can have the power to engage the modern game‐acquainted generations in self‐motivated learning. Learning by doing has been proven to be an efficient method of teaching and electronic games force learners to participate in the learning process. Electronic games support the development of strategic thinking,  planning,  communication,  collaboration  and  negotiating 59.  Use  of  gaming  can  be used to support the understanding of risk versus reward, tradeoffs and risk measurement as well as experience with multitasking and complex analysis 60. Also games designed for other than  educational  purposes  can  have  a  learning  effect  by  supporting  and  developing  the learners learning style. In modern video games, players learn how to play the game, learn coordination in order to use the controls, learn to navigate in 3D‐worlds, learn to work as teams and can acquire practice in music (RockBand) and physical skills (Wii Fit). Good video 58  Chen & Michael, 2005 59 ,56    Susi et al., 2007   34
  • 35.  games  also  have  tutorials,  scoring  and  logging/playback/observer‐functions 61  which facilitate learning.Learning  by  gaming  focuses  on  problem  solving  and  learning  instead  of  more  traditional pedagogically  rich  experiences.  In  addition,  communication  in  learning  by  gaming  tries  to reflect natural (non‐perfect) communication 62. Also game design can function as a powerful tool  for  learning  since  the  only  way  to  create  an  educative  game  is  to  understand  the phenomena being taught 63. Chen & Michael (2005) highlight the importance of evaluation in using games in education. Teachers need to have a way to verify that learning as occurred. This  is  necessary  for  student  comparisons,  demonstration  of  skills  level  and  allowing learners to move to the next level. Games already measure completion of tasks, success of missions, time required to complete a mission, number of mistakes made etc. Some games also adjust content and skill level according to player performance. 3.2.2 Simulations Simulations  can  be  especially  useful  in  training  situations  where  the  real  world  equivalent would be dangerous, expensive and time‐consuming 64:  Hazardous rescue missions   Fire fighting   Medical procedures (operations, ER prioritizations),   Tasks performed in extreme conditions (space missions, ocean surroundings)   Military assignments  Motor sport (familiarity with new vehicles or tracks) Simulations  can  be  also  used  to  present  learners  with  different  scenarios  played  out depending on the choices they make. Such simulations are invaluable where the learner is encouraged to use critical thinking skills, subjects such as politics, marketing, management training, business and military officer training.  3.2.3 Information Common to Gaming and Simulations Simulations  are  used  in  many  industrial  situations.  Factories  teach  employees  product processes  with  simulation  games.  Simulations  of  the  whole  process  help  each  individual understand their role in the process and how their actions affect other parts of the process. The  military  trains  soldiers  for  various  tasks  with  simulations.  These  tasks  can  include strategic  decision  making,  mission  training  and  vehicle  control.  Governmental  businesses use simulations to rehearse crisis management, emergency response procedures (terrorists, diseases, floods) and ethics. Simulations can also be used in city/traffic planning, budgeting and policy formulation. 61  see Chen & Michael, 2005) 62  (Susi et al., 2007) 63  (see Chen & Michael, 2005) 64  see Susi et al., 2007  35
  • 36.  Businesses  have  adopted  learning  by  gaming  and  simulations  to  educate  their  staff  on people  skills,  job‐specific  skills,  communication  skills  and  strategic  skills.  In  healthcare simulations and games are utilized for patient training in addition to staff training. Patients are instructed on healthy eating habits / self‐care and trained on rehabilitative motor skills. Learning by gaming and simulations also help with cognitive functioning (memory), therapy and biofeedback. Since games and simulations require the learner to proactively engage in the process, they may, at their best, teach more than passive following of a subject in class. Case Study: Example Use of Simulations ‐ Emergency Services CollegeThe  emergency  services  college  started  their  e‐learning  development  efforts  in  2006  by creating a plan on how to integrate simulations in the curricula. They define simulations assafe  teaching  ensembles  duplicating  real‐life  situations.  The  goal  of  the  simulations  is  to facilitate the creation of internal modes of conduct and response patterns for the learners. Their project runs to 2011 but they have already had positive experiences with pilot courses where they have used wireless image transfer and interactive boards to broadcast real‐life situations  to  classrooms.  In  actual  training  sessions,  the  official  emergency  communicationchannels  are  in  use.  According  to  the  experiences  of  the  Emergency  services  college,  using simulations in teaching has increased the interaction between learners and professionals andalso  developed  pedagogic  planning  in  the  college.  Simulations  and  related  documents  areoccasionally also shared online. One form of an e‐learning rehearsal is implementing a real‐time  accident  simulation  with  all  partied  involved  in  the  rescue  process.  According  to  theEmergency Services College, all parties are more likely to attend when they can do so fromtheir own place of work/study. Such rehearsals are also less costly to carry out than real‐life rehearsals.  The  emergency  college  praises  e‐learning  for  giving  access  to  professional instructors that are more willing to participate in evaluating simulated situations.   Learning  by  gaming  can  be  a  compelling  educational  tool  since  games  are  familiar  to  the younger generations. There are however also adult learners who are not yet familiar with electronic  games  and  this  needs  to  be  kept  in mind when creating learning by gaming for teaching purposes. To have the attractive features of games, learning by gaming needs to be easy to use and engaging and in its initial stages within a non‐challenging environment. The difficulty level also  needs  to  be  designed  in  such  a  manner  that  the  games  are  challenging  but  yet performable and rewarding. The critics find that games try to make learning too trivial and steer learning away from deep understanding, reflection and thinking (see Susi et al., 2007) Games  are  also  accused  of  promoting  violence,  causing  depression/isolation/fatigue  and incurring  health‐problems  (muscle  tension,  headaches).  The  proponents  of  learning  by gaming in turn argue that learning need not be boring and that fun and learning 65 are not mutually exclusive.  6665  http://www.pelastusopisto.fi/pelastus/home.nsf/pages/index_eng 66  For more information, see Honkanen et al. 2010 and Helveranta et al., 2009  36
  • 37.   3.2.4  Advantages of Gaming The advantages of learning by gaming are that they train players’ 67: analytical skills  spatial skills, mental rotation capabilities  strategic skills  learning capabilities  psychomotor skills  visual selective attention, 3D perception  teamwork  self‐monitoring  problem recognition  problem solving  decision making  memory  social skills: collaboration, joint decision‐making  information seeking  stress management  processes 3.3 Innovativeness and best practice 3.3.1 The e‐ruralnet network commissioned case studies on best practice from within its members to look at examples that relate to rural areas and feature innovative solutions and alternative media. The best practice examples can be found on the project website in the form of an online library at:   www.prismanet.gr/eruralnet/en/library.php Summaries of best practice examples are presented below selectively: Risk prevention in manufacturing – Spain Risk prevention in the manufacturing industry through e‐learning is an interesting case for the  various  implementations  of  new  technologies  in  employee  training.  Genesis  XXI  from Spain  has  developed  several  products  for  occupational  risk  prevention  in  the  aggregate manufacturing  sector  and  in  the  field  of  concrete  production  in  3d  environments  using simulation scenarios. The scenario introduces the student, as a character, in an aggregate or concrete factory. The trainee must solve a range of problems and situations each of which 67  see Susi et al., 2007 for details  37
  • 38.  offer learning in different content related to occupational risk prevention. The student must complete evaluations, as quests, across 3 levels related to different workplaces in the factory in order to satisfactorily complete the course. This training product was designed by Genesis XXI in collaboration with associations related to the sector. Specific care was taken so that the  training  can  be  delivered  event  to  those  not  very  familiar  with  ICT.  The  simulation doesn’t  require  access  to  internet,  it  can  be  distributed  from  a  CD  or  USB  stick.  The  game based  elements  introduced  in  the  training  makes  the  learning  experience  more  interesting and specific to the workplace as the student is placed and allowed to interact with familiar environments.  Mondi Dinamici platform – Italy Mondi dinamici is a platform, developed by SCI of Italy, concerning a 3D Virtual World that allows to build, visit and explore virtual environments and also interact with other users. The browser  can  be  downloaded  from  a  specific  website  and  makes  use  of  SCIVoice  to  allow vocal  communication  among  virtual  characters.  The  software  is  used  for  simulation  in environmental  scenarios  like  impact  of  infrastructures  or  reforestation  in  a  landscape, simulation of a tourist route, in the sector of safety, for instance to study the behaviour of a person in a situation of simulated danger. It is based on Active Worlds®, software WEB 3D multi‐user. Proactive video simulation – Germany Proactive video simulation in the form of interactive educational videos to various types of employee  appraisal  is  starting  to  gain  ground  in  corporate  environments.  MENSOR  of Germany  has  a  set  of  services  based  on  this  technology  where  learners  with  the  use  of interactive  educational  videos,  have  the  opportunity  to  self‐determine  a  structured  filmed conversation  in  the  role  of  the  supervisor.  Following  a  selected  interview  structure,  the  e‐learner obtains evaluation comments as well as a verbal evaluation of all chosen interview steps. A theoretical section complements the learning offer. The videos are available online for companies for their internal management development and executive training and in a CD  version  for  individuals.  Furthermore,  the  trainer  can  use  the  video  simulation  for  their teaching  activities  and  purchase  an  additional  CD  with  material  for  lectures  and  trainings like educational texts, slides and exercise materials.  Training for animal welfare – Spain   The Animal Welfare training program, developed by the University of Barcelona, addresses the training needs of the agricultural sector via new tools and emerging technologies (social networks,  3D  environments,  virtual  worlds)  and  different  media  suitable  for  e‐learning delivery  (PC,  mobile  phones,  PDAs,  mp3‐players  etc.).  It  seeks  to  train  people  involved  in animal  handling  about  the  opportunities  to  use  new  technologies,  and  to  create tools and training content. A pilot course was launched in 2009 addressing farmers with the objective to  develop  skills  related  to  care  of  farm  animals.  The  training  program  was  specifically designed to facilitate access to e‐learning for a target group without developed ICT‐skills or previous e‐learning experience and attention was paid to creating guides and manuals and assigning  tutors.  The  training  incorporated  many  media  formats  such  as  game‐based learning with an iPhone, course management with Moodle and social networking via Ning as well  as  multimedia  content  and  micro  videos.  The  use  of  various  media  facilitated  fluent interaction and the training program generated demand for e‐training in other fields as well.  38
  • 39.  Learnstatt21 – Germany The  technical  platform  “Lernstatt21”  simulates  a  fully  functional  virtual  enterprise  for training and continuing education and is suitable for people with permanent or temporary mobility impairment, particularly for disabled persons and people in rural areas with a weak infrastructure.  The  virtual  business  is  built  on  a  IBM/Lotus  database.  In  the  virtual departments  of  the  company  (many  kinds  of  business  activities  can  be  simulated),  the business transactions, which should reflect the reality, are initiated externally by tele‐tutors or coaches. The tele‐tutor has to ensure the professional control and quality assurance of the training  content.  Department‐specific  training  and  tool  boxes  (form  filling  /  equipment  / technical  specifications)  are  the  interfaces  between  the  learner  and  the  training  objective. The  flexibility  and  typical  characteristics  of  Lotus‐Notes‐databases  (especially  groupware‐, workflow‐ and full text functions) provide the necessary education dynamic and avoid stand‐alone‐situations  of  single  participants.  A  Lotus‐  Notes‐  Office‐  application  and  a  web‐ content management system is also used. All user‐orientated processes are easy to use with a  web‐browser.  The  platform  requires  a  standard  PC  and  peripheral  devices  like  printer, scanner,  web‐camera  and  at  least  an  ISDN‐Internet  connection. 39
  • 40.  SUMMARY This report clearly lays out the major e‐learning issues as they affect e‐learning within the rural  context.  These  issues  include  equality of access to broadband, the use of alternative technology  (videos,  DVDs,  CDs,  mp3‐players,  e‐book  readers  etc.)  to  compensate  for inadequate ICT infrastructure and e‐learning, as a way for rural learners to access learning communities and benefit from contemporary learning trends (web 2.0 applications etc).  E‐learning  continues  to  generate  a  great  deal  of  interest  and  input  from a wide variety of sources, because it enables learning to take place anywhere and anytime. This is particularly important  from  the  aspect  of  lifelong  learning  as  adult  learners  often  have  multiple responsibilities  in  addition  to  studying.  Learning  that  is  relevant,  has  the  ability  to  be customized and re‐purposed to meet the restricted schedules and varying locations of these learners  sounds  ideal.  E‐learning  can  also  be  cost‐efficient  both  for  the  provider (repeatability) and the student (travelling costs, time from work). Multiple check‐lists and frameworks have been developed based on the proven theories and research referred to throughout the report. One major aspect for training providers either interested in e‐learning or already involved is to remember to keep the needs of the target group as the central tenet of all developments. This includes aspects of learning style and the quality of the learning material. Both the technology and the content need to be of high quality  but  e‐learning  course  creation  need  not  automatically  be  expensive  to  develop  in‐house or externally commission. Learners have been found to value interaction, content and flexibility  over  technological  solutions.  From  the  rural  learner’s  point  of  view,  e‐learning enables  studying  of  niche  or  mainstream  fields  in  which  other  training  options  may  be behind long geographical distances. E‐learning can also provide feasible access to the best practitioners  within  the  learners  chosen  field  instead  of  opting  for  the  training  institution that is close by. This in turn generates increased competition between training businesses.  Contemporary  training  providers  can  no  longer  rely  on  the  assumption  that  learning  will continue to be at least part in the form of classroom courses and lectures as it mainly has been for hundreds of years before the breakthrough of the information society.Contemporary  workers  need  the  skills  delivered  by  e‐learning  in  order  to  be  able  to compete  in  the  job  market  “People  with  good  ICT  skills  earn  between  3%  and  10%  more than people without such skills” 68. In addition the ability to locate and process information, the skills related to computer and Internet use and the know‐how of how to navigate within electronic social networks are vital life skills within a knowledge economy/society where use of the internet is fast becoming an essential skill.  For e‐learning to be a truly viable studying option in rural areas, local, regional, national and transnational  initiatives  are  required  as  described  in  Section  5  to  deal  with  the  level  of inequality  of  access  which  is  currently  the  case.  Currently  rural  learners  are  typically  at  a disadvantage  when  compared  with  their  urban  compatriots  when  it  comes  to  equality  of access  to  the  kind  of  up‐to‐date  information  required  in  a  knowledge  economy.  Although standalone  applications  have  a  valuable  role  to  play  as  media  to  be  used  in  peripheral locations  and  when  travelling,  the  communication  and  information  updating  possibilities 68  Rural Broadband – Why Does it Matter. (2011) UK Commission for Rural Communities  40
  • 41.  that  the  Internet  provides  cannot  be  ignored  if  all  members  of  the  EU  are  to  be  included equally within the contemporary knowledge community.  41
  • 42.  Terminology Alternative Media= wired mobile, wireless mobile, Video via: DVDs, cassettes, Audiovia: CDs, mp3 files/players, telephones, m-learning via internet enables mobiledevice, internet, TV, radio, computers, games consoles, handheld consoles (PS3etc).E‐learning / Electronic learning = Learning facilitated by ICT or content/interaction delivered by  electronic  media,  which  can  be  purely  distance  learning  or  blended  learning  including some elements of face‐to‐face interaction.  M‐learning = Combines e‐learning and mobile computing/devices, sometimes using simpler versions of materials.Blended learning = A combination of e‐learning and traditional, face‐to‐face learning. It can also refer to other combinations of learning environments. a.k.a. “Hybrid learning”.Web‐based learning = Using the Internet for learning. E‐learning with an online connection. E‐Lecture = Live or recorded lecture transmitted via electronic media. SMS = Short Message Service Lifelong  learning  =  A  process  of  continual  development  through  an  individual’s  lifespan. Lifelong learning includes formal and informal learning. Learnware = E‐learning software. Computer‐based  training  (CBT)  =  Courses  and  training  using  a  personal  computer  as  the primary tool. Interactive video (IV) = Blending video and interaction. Distance education = Learning where the learner and instructor are in a physically different place. Digital  television  (D(i)TV)  =  Digital  broadcasting  of  television  programs.  Facilitates  higher quality and added functionality. Paperless  education  =  Storing  and  delivering  courses  in  electronic  format  to  save  space, printing costs and the nature. Wireless  mobile  devices  =  PDAs,  mobile  PCs/tablet  PCs,  notebooks,  cell  phones,  smart phones and others.Smartphone = a mobile phone with advances features. Smartphones include an operating system and can run more sophisticated applications than mobiles. Tagging = a non‐hierarchical keyword attached to a word, sentence or chapter. 2 G = 2nd generation (2G) / Personal communication mobiles enable data transmission.3G = 3rd generation (3G) mobiles support wireless audio and video transmissions as well as mobile  internet  access.  The  3G  system  enables  simultaneous  transmittance  of  audio  and data. 3G mobiles can be used for watching mobile TV and videoconferencing.  42
  • 43.   Examples of Popular Social and Learning Software Name  Link Facebook   http://www.facebook.com Ning  http://www.ning.com Twitter  http://twitter.com MySpace   http://www.myspace.com Litefeeds  http://www.litefeeds.com Blogger  https://www.blogger.com Letmeparty  http://www.letmeparty.com Skype  http://www.skype.com AIM  http:www.aol.co.uk Windows Live  http:www.windows.com Elgg  http:www.elgg.org Flickr  http://www.flickr.com Meebo  http://www.meebo.com Newsgator  http://www.newsgator.com PBWorks  http://pbworks.com YouTube  http://www.youtube.com SchoolLoop  http://www.schoolloop.com IXL  http://www.ixl.com GoogleDocs  http://docs.google.com Wordle  http://www.wordle.net Animoto  http://animoto.com Connexions  http://cnx.org Digg  http://digg.com/news Diigo  http://www.diigo.com FriendFeed  http://friendfeed.com PhotoBucket  http://photobucket.com Technorati  http://technorati.com Mendeley  http://www.mendeley.com Posterous  https://posterous.com Socialmention  http://www.socialmention.com Reddit  http://www.reddit.com Roomatic  http://roomatic.com Seesmic  http://seesmic.com Drop.io  http://drop.io Slashdot  http://slashdot.org Stumbleupon  http://www.stumbleupon.com TweetDeck  http://www.tweetdeck.com Twibes  http://www.twibes.com Amplify  http://amplify.com Wikispaces  http://www.Wikispaces.com DigiTales  http://www.digi‐tales.org GoogleMaps  http://maps.google.com TED  http://www.ted.com  43
  • 44.  Bibliography Attewell J. (2005) Mobile Technologies and Learning. A Technology Update and m‐Learning Project Summary. Learning and Skills Development Agency. London. Atton C. (2002) Alternative Media. Sage Publications. London. Barker  K.  C.  (2007)  E‐learning  Quality  Standards  for  Consumer  Protection  and  Consumer Confidence. A Canadian Case Study in e‐Learning Quality Assurance. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, Vol. 10 (2). 109‐119. Beyth‐Marom R., Chajut E., Roccas S. and Sagiv L. (2003) Internet‐assisted Versus Traditional Distance  Learning  Environments:  Factors  Affecting  Learners’  Preferences.  Computers  & Education, Vol 41 (1). 65‐76. Brown T. (2003) The Role of m‐Learning in the Future of e‐Learning in Africa? Presentation at the 21st ICDE World Conference, June 2003, Hong Kong. Buzzetto‐More N., Sweat‐Guy R. and Elobaid M. (2007) Reading in A Digital Age: e‐Books Are Learners  Ready  For  This  Learning  Object?  Interdisciplinary  Journal  of  Knowledge  and Learning Objects, Vol3. Cebeci Z. and Tekdal M. (2006) Using Podcasts as Audio Learning Objects. Interdisciplinary Journal of Knowledge and Learning Objects, Vol. 2. 47‐57. Chen  S.  and  Michael  D.  (2005)  Proof  of  Learning:  Assessment  in  Learning  by  gaming. http://www.cedmaeuropeorg/newsletter  %20articles/misc/Proof%20of%20Learning%20‐20Assessment%20 in%20Serious%20games%20 (Oct%2005).pdf read 7.9.2010. Cousin  G.,  Deepwell  F.,  Land  R.  and  Ponti  M.  (2004)  Theorising  implementation:  Variation and Commonality in European Approaches to e‐Learning. In: Banks S, Goodyear P., Hodgson V., Jones C.,Lally V., Concannon F., Flynn A. and Campbell M. (2005) What Campus‐based Learners Think about the  Quality  and  Benefits  of  e‐Learning?  British  Journal  of  Educational  Technology.  Vol.  36 (3). 501‐512. Deepwell  F.  (2007)  Embedding  Quality  in  e‐Learning  Implementation  through  Evaluation. Educational Technology & Society. Vol. 10 (2). 34‐43. Demetriadis S. and Pombortsis, A. (2007) e‐Lectures for Flexible Learning: a Study on their Learning Efficiency. Journal of Educational Technology & Society. Vol. 10 (2). 147‐157.33 Devi  R.  (2006)  E‐learning  Tools  and  Technologies  for  Rural  Development  Community  with Special Reference to Training: Experiences of National Institute of Rural Development. DRTC – ICT Conference on Digital Learning Environment, 11th‐13th January, Bangalore. Dewar T (1999) Adult Learning Online. http://www.calliopelearning.com/resources/papers/adult.html, Read 25th August 2010. Dille B. and Mezack M. (1991) Identifying Predictors of High Risk Among Community College Telecourse Learners. American Journal of Distance Education, Vol. 5 (1). 24–35. Downbeythes  S.  (2001)  Learning  Objectives:  Resources  for  Distance  Education  Worldwide. International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, Vol. 2 (1).  44
  • 45.  Ebner  M.,  Holzinger  A.  and  Maurer  H.  (2007)  Web  2.0  Technology:  Future  Interfaces  for Technology  Enhanced  Learning?  Proceedings  in  the  4th  International  Conference  on Universal Access in Human‐Computer Interaction UAHCI. Beijing, China. Ellis  R.  A.  and  Calvo  R.  A.  (2007)  Minimum  Indicators  to  Assure  Quality  of  LMS‐supported Blended Learning. Journal of Educational Technology & Society Vol 10 (2). 60‐70.European Union (EU) (2003) Fact Sheet – Rural Development in the European Union. Luxembourg. Farrell G. and Lukesch R. (1998) The Innovativeness of Rural Europe – a Contribution to the Concept  of  Innovation.  The  38th  Congress  of  the  European  Regional  Science  Association. Vienna. Frydenberg  J.  (2002)  Quality  standards  in  e‐Learning:  A  matrix  of  analysis.  International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, Vol. 3 (2). Glaser  M.  (2007)  BBC  Trains  Iranian  Journalists  through  ZigZag  Online  Magazine.  PBS Mediashift,  October  18.  http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2007/10/bbc‐trains‐iranian‐journalists‐through‐zigzagonline‐magazine291.htmlGunasekaran  A.,  McNeil  R.  D.  and  Shaul  D.  (2002)  E‐learning:  Research  and  Applications. Industrial and Commercial Training, Vol. 34 (2). 44‐53. Harun  M.  (2002)  Integrating  e‐Learning  into  the  Workplace.  The  Internet  and  Higher Education. Vol. 4.301‐310. Honkanen  M.,  Neuvonen  T.  and  Rissanen  T.  (2010)  Simulaatioavusteisen  verkko‐oppimisympäristön kokemukset ja haasteet. ITK 2010. Pelastusopisto. Helveranta  K.,  Laatikainen,  T.  and  Törrönen  R.  (2009)  Simulaatio‐oppimisen  perusteet Pelastusopistolla. Tampereen ammattikorkeakoulu, Ammatillinen opettajakorkeakoulu.34Kam M., Agarwal A., Lal S., Mathur A., Tewari A. ans Canny J. (2008) Designing E‐Learning Games for Rural Children in India: A Format for Balancing Learning with Fun. Proceedings of the 7th ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems. Cape Town, South Africa. 58‐67. Ladyshewsky R. (2004) E‐Learning Compared with Face to Face: Differences in the Academic Achievement  of  Postgraduate  Business  Learners.  Australasian  Journal  of  Educational Technology. Vol. 20 (3). 316‐336. Lee M‐C. (2010) Explaining and Predicting Users’ Continuance Intention toward e‐Learning: An Extension  of the Expectation‐Confirmation Model. Computers & Education. Vol. 54 (2). 506‐516. Maloney  E.  (2007)  What  Web  2.0  Can  Teach  us  about  Learning.  The  Chronicle  of  Higher Education. Vol.53 (18). Mason  R.  and  Rennie  F.  (2004)  Broadband:  A  Solution  for  Rural  e‐Learning?  International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, Vol. 5 (1). McLoughlin C. (2000) Beyond the Halo Effect: Investigating the Quality of Student Learning Online. Proceedings  on  Moving  Online  Conference.  School  of  Social  Sciences,  Southern  Cross University. Lismore, Australia. 141 – 154.  45
  • 46.  Moore  M.G.  and  Kearsley  G.  (1996)  Distance  Education:  A  Systems  View.  Wadsworth Publishing Company.Belmont, Canada. Parker  A.  (1999).  A  Study  of  Variables  that  Predict  Dropout  from  Distance  Education. International Journal of Educational Technology. Vol. 1 (2). Retrieved June 30th 2006 from http://www.outreach, uiuc.edu/ijet/v1n2/parker/ Payne J. (2007) Adult learning in rural areas. http://www.niace.org.uk/lifelonglearninginquiry/docs/Rural. pdf Read 7th September 2010. Paechter M., Maier B. and Macher D. (2010) Learners’ Expectations of and Experiences in e‐Learning:  Their  Relation  to  Learning  Achievements  and  Course  Satisfaction.  Computers  & Education, Vol.54 (1). 222‐229. Peters,  K.  (2007)  m‐Learning:  Positioning  Educators  for  a  Mobile,  Connected  Future. International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, Vol. 8 (2). Rollett, H., Lux M., Strohmaier M, and Dosinger G. (2007) The Web 2.0 Way of Learning with Technologies.International Journal of Learning Technology, Vol. 3 (1). 87–107. Rural Broadband – Why Does it Matter. (2011) UK Commission for Rural Communities  Ruth  A.  and  Houghton  L.  (2009)  The  Wiki  Way  of  Learning.  Australasian  Journal  of Educational Technology.Vol. 25 (2). 135‐152.35 Sambrook  S.  (2003)  E‐learning  in  Small  Organizations.  Education  +  Training,  Vol.  45  (8/9). 506‐516. Sandberg K., Ivergard T. and Vinberg S. (2004) E‐service to Citizens and Companies in Rural Areas.  International  Journal  of  the  Computer,  the  Internet  and  Management,  Vol.  12  (2). 213‐222. Selim  H.  (2007)  Critical  Success  Factors  for  e‐Learning  Acceptance:  Confirmatory  Factor Models. Computers & Education. 49 (2). 396‐413. Shee D. and Wang Y‐S. (2008) Multi‐criteria Evaluation of the Web‐based e‐Learning System: A Methodology Based on Learner Satisfaction and its Applications. Computers & Education. Vol. 50 (3). 894‐905. Shirattudin N., Hassan S. & Landoni M. (2003). A usability study for promoting eContent in higher education. Educational Technology & Society, Vol. 6 (4), 112‐124. Smørdal  O.  and  Gregory  J.  (2003)  Personal  Digital  Assistants  in  Medical  Education  and Practice. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning. Vol. 19 (3). 320‐329. Stone  T.  E.  (1992).  A  New  Look  at  the  Role  of  Locus  of  Control  in  Completion  Rates  in Distance Education. Research in Distance Education. 4 (2). 6–9. Susi  T.,  Johannesson  M.  and  Backlund  P.  (2007)  Learning  by  gaming  –  An  Overview. Technical report HS‐IKITR‐07‐001. University of Skövde, Sweden.Thampuran S., Burleson W. and Watts K. (2001) Multimedia Distance Learning without the Wait. 31st ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference. Reno, NV.  46
  • 47.  Trifonova  A.  and  Ronchetti  M.  (2003)  Where  is  Mobile  Learning  Going? In Rossett A. (Ed.) Proceedings of World Conference on E‐Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare and Higher Education. Phoenix, Arizona. 1794‐1801. Wenger  E.  (1998)  Communities  of  Practice:  Learning,  Meaning  and  Identity.  Cambridge University  Press.  Williams  J.B.  and  Jacobs  J.  (2004)  Exploring  the  Use  of  Blogs  as  Learning Spaces in the Higher Education Sector. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology. Vol. 20 (2). 232‐247. UK  Commission  for  Rural  Communities  ‐  7  Sep  2010.  Agenda  for  Change:  Releasing  the Economic Potential of England’s Rural Areas. Williams P., Nicholas D. and Gunter B. (2005) E‐learning: What the Literature Tells us about Distance Education. An Overview. Aslib Proceedings: New Information Perspectives. Vol. 57 (2). 109‐122. Wilson R. (2003) Ebook Readers in Higher Education. Education Technology and Society, Vol. 6 (4). 8‐17. Wu Y‐T. and Tsai, C‐C. (2007) Developing an Information Commitment Survey for Assessing Learners’  Web  Information  Searching  Strategies  and  Evaluative  Standards  for  Web Materials. Educational Technology & Society. Vol. 10 (2). 120‐132. Yukselturk  E.  and  Bulut  S.  (2007)  Predictors  for  Student  Success  in  an  Online  Course. Educational Technology & Society. Vol. 10 (2). 71‐83.  47

×