MOOCs @ Edinburgh: our approach, experience and outcomes

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Amy Woodgate and Christine Sinclair present MOOCs @ Edinburgh: our approach, experience and outcomes at the MOOCs in Scottish Education event at the University of Strathclyde, hosted by RSC Scotland …

Amy Woodgate and Christine Sinclair present MOOCs @ Edinburgh: our approach, experience and outcomes at the MOOCs in Scottish Education event at the University of Strathclyde, hosted by RSC Scotland on 19th March 2014.

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  • Very similar to slide 1
  • The xMOOC and cMOOC distinction is quite influential, but things are more nuanced than that.
  • We didn’t make claims about being connectivist, but some of our students did on our behalf. It all started with a twitter hashtag, which is still active
  • Emphasising features that are external and internal to Coursera platform
  • Brief illustration – don’t dwell on it.
  • Again, just illustration
  • Brief observation on importance of presence and changes made in second run.

Transcript

  • 1. University of Edinburgh MOOCs @ Edinburgh Our approach, experience & outcomes Amy Woodgate & Christine Sinclair MOOCs central coordination / EDC academic team
  • 2. www.coursera.org/edinburgh
  • 3. • 6 courses (wave 1) + 8 courses (wave 2) • Broad subject areas – academic led and short in length (5-7 weeks) • Fully online, free to take, open resources – CC licenses • New as MOOCs, not f2f conversion Academic proposes new course idea Team meeting with MOOC support Begin content production Course live Courses end Courses and the internal process BoS + CSPC Course approval Head of School approval sought Confirm live date Constant dialogue and review. Training. Community events. Sign off video content Standardised content uploaded Content refresh for next iteration
  • 4. … Lots of central guidance and resources along the way!
  • 5. Academic course development • No imposed approach or template • Encouragement to choose an approach suitable for subject delivery and which the team were comfortable with • Encouragement to experiment with platform Community and transparency • Talking to peers and asking for feedback • Development of teams – not individuals • Sharing practice, good resources found Recycle, repurpose, reuse • Use of creative commons as default • Encouragement to think about resources beyond MOOC space • Awareness raising of open content Ensuring quality – how?
  • 6. EDC MOOC (… a little different from the rest!) •Design challenged the mainstream •No videos – learner developed content •Encouraged learners to explore other platforms Running in parallel to an online MSc Digital Education module: E-learning and Digital Cultures •Similar topics – different content •Different levels – MSc = PG, MOOC = UG-level •Interesting explicit connection explored – students on the MSc course to interact with MOOC, e.g. forum discussions
  • 7. • xMOOC • Instructivist • Guru Professors • Content then Quiz • cMOOC • Constructivist • Connectivist • Networking Competing Designs
  • 8. Beyond x and c 1. MOOCs are multiple - cMOOC/xMOOC binary no longer holds 2. MOOC pedagogy is not embedded in MOOC platform 3. The teacher persists in the MOOC Adapted from Bayne & Ross 2014 Bayne, S., & Ross, J. (2014) The pedagogy of the Massive Open Online Course: the UK view: Higher Education Academy.
  • 9. How we did it • Long lead in • Open access films …and readings • Blogs & social media • Google hangouts • Image competition • Digital artefact assignment Twitter feed Blog feed
  • 10. Films and Readings
  • 11. Digital Artefacts
  • 12. Team – not gurus • Sharing blogging, monitoring, leading discussions • Hangouts proved popular • Joined by 8 CTAs in 2nd run • More telepresence
  • 13. Data analysis
  • 14. Course Sign-up > Active First week > Total Active Last week > Total Active Sign-up > SoA Active > SoA AI Planning 001 57% 69% 4% 2% 4% AI Planning 002 52% 49% 12% 2% 4% Astrobiology 001 45% 89% 18% 17% 37% Astrobiology 002 57% 54% 24% 12% 21% Critical Thinking 001 40% 66% 5% 8% 20% Critical Thinking 002 49% 39% 22% 6% 11% EDC 001 55% 79% 5% 4% 8% EDC 002 50% 35% 8% 2% 3% Equine Nutrition 001 81% 79% 30% 36% 44% Equine Nutrition 002 65% 59% 32% … … Intro to Philosophy 001 47% 73% 20% 8% 18% Intro to Philosophy 002 59% 38% 11% 6% 11% Intro to Philosophy 003 64% 37% … … … Higgs Boson 001 58% 83% … … … Totals 52% 60% 14% 8% 15%
  • 15. What sorts of questions might we ask ourselves about those who enrol and those who study our MOOCS? 1. Where do they come from? 2. How old are they? 3. What is their background, for example educationally? 4. Why do they wish to study MOOCs in general and specific MOOCs in particular? 5. How do these features correlate with performance/engagement on specific MOOCs? What limitations do we have in addressing these questions? (eg % response rates, minorities vs majorities) How much confidence can we have in our answers? (eg veracity, stability of response over time) What actions might our answers lead to? (eg targeting, inducements, patience)
  • 16. NOTES: Data in the following slides are from Edinburgh’s 6 Coursera MOOCs (our Futurelearn MOOCs are not yet at this stage) They are drawn from voluntary entry surveys: the first MOOC iteration surveys (“1st Run”, MOOC_name1)were outside the Coursera platform and the second surveys within it The same survey questions were posed in the two iterations Response rates were approx 25% of enrolments at the time of surveying, pre-MOOC start date
  • 17. 3486 active learners accessing the course site from Africa IP addresses
  • 18. 646 learners from Africa completed their enrolled courses and received an SoA 19% conversion total 15 > 6 learners from Malawi 40% conversion
  • 19. Surprising?
  • 20. Measuring success: “Drop out rates”, retention and perceptions • Total sign ups: 620,000 approx. • Total active users: 320,000 • Total active users week one: 193,000 • Total completed (SoA awarded): 46,600 Wave 1 + 2 courses Did you get out of the MOOC what you wanted?
  • 21. What did you want to get out of the MOOC? Flipping more than just the classroom… Beginning to ask ourselves (and our learners) • Did you get what you wanted from the experience? • Did you enjoy the experience? At least 320,000 new learners engaged with our content – huge success!!
  • 22. On-campus • Enriching resource for students, signpost MOOC • Datasets within learning activities = research • Repurposing of content, e.g. embedding videos • Sign-posting to others’ courses Off-campus • Courses for credit, e.g. University of Maryland • Courses within teaching, e.g. Generation Rwanda • Activity in itself with class, e.g. local Schools • Translations, e.g. Portuguese and Chinese • Chinese parallel server scheme How is content being used and where?
  • 23. VideosVideos ImagesImages Handouts / documents Handouts / documents AudioAudio LinksLinks Discussion Qs Discussion Qs The experience The experience • Embed • Recycle/reuse • Be inspired • Develop your own • Use the structure • Activities and assessment • Encourage MOOC use to enrich understanding • Sign-post • Make CC content • Use as a case study • Ask students for feedback to inform own development AssessmentsAssessments Social Media Social Media All elements of the MOOC can be repurposed in multiple ways
  • 24.  On presidents/SMTs of universities  On governments/agencies  On faculty  On students  On student funders, incl parents  On the media  Varied by region: US∙UK∙Europe∙Oz∙NZ / SE Asia / China / Asia / S & C America NB: This is very subjective – there are 1000s of universities in the world!! http://star.arm.ac.uk/ ? What impact have MOOCs had?
  • 25. Enthusiasm for MOOC engagement is (still) high and we are beginning to see big impact across the institution: • New applications for fully online MSc programmes, e.g. MSc Philosophy • ODL programme teams pushing VLEs and improving student experience through MOOC lessons • Getting non-ODL Schools over the online line • Interdisciplinary courses and collaborations Building internal capacity – more than just building courses … Every MOOC gets 90(+)% learner satisfaction – impact is more than these stats.
  • 26. What impact have our MOOCs had… Over 700k enrollees, 34k certificates distributed 14 courses, 62+ academics, 50+ PhD student TAs, 30 Community TAs involved 3 new textbooks written, journal publications and book chapters, internal student recruitment increases, new online MSc development, international collaborations … And this is only a snapshot of the measurable impact!
  • 27. Plans for the future? • Internal • Even more enriching, embedding, research etc. • Recognition for engagement, e.g. HEAR transcript • All content accessible, findable and open to share • Portfolios of content that work well as a package • External • Community outreach post: connection with Schools & Councils, local community groups and meaningful events, e.g. Science Festival • Potential for new courses based on local/national needs • Referendum, business, computer science etc.
  • 28. Strategic developments • Community connections • Students and University connecting with the community through MOOC+ activities • Open Access content • All content will be published openly on open access platforms for use outwith MOOC space • Full course available for free to other Educational providers • Encouraging reuse of content in on-campus courses • Educational research • Big data, digital education developments • Use of data for student projects, e.g. dissertations