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Creating Inclusive Information

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This presentation was delivered by RSC Scotland and focuses on accessible material and the inclusion features/facets of Moodle

This presentation was delivered by RSC Scotland and focuses on accessible material and the inclusion features/facets of Moodle

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  • Creating Learning Resources and Exploring the Accessibility Features of MoodleMargaret McKay and John MaguireJISC RSC Scotland
  • RSC Scotland TeamFionnuala Carmichael – ManagerMargaret McKay – InclusionGrainne Hamilton – eAssessmentKirsty Menzies – AdminstratorTheresa Duffy – HECeleste McLaughlin – Staff DevelopmentJohn Maguire – John MaguireMark Clark - Inftastructure and SystemsJoan Walker – Learning and TeachingRoyce McKie - Learning and TeachingPenny Roberston - Learning Resources
  • How do you know if the information you create is accessible? Creating Inclusive Resources with MS Word and PowerPointMargaret McKay eAdvisor: JISC Regional Support CentreCreating Inclusive Resources with MS Word and PowerPointMargaret McKay eAdvisor: JISC Regional Support CentreTextLayoutColourImagesStylesSaving from Word to PDF
  • QuestionA typical group of 1st year students were asked about difficulties that they experienced with written course work on a day to day basis.What barriers do you think they highlighted?
  • A typical group of students (not specifically students with disabilities) on a mainstream course highlighted the following barriers to learningBlurred/fuzzy print.Headaches/discomfort if text too close together. Strong/bold print leaves a shadow.Lose place on line.Small print.Document not accessible with my assistive technology.Vocabulary difficult/unfamiliar.Long document difficult to follow.Forget if sentences long.Time to read/take notes.
  • JISC Techdis Model of Accessibility MaturityWhere are you?
  • Techdis Toolboxwww.jisctechdis.ac.uk/tbx/homeThe TechDis Toolbox is a collection of resources forpeople with disabilities or difficulties which give useful hints and tips on technologies that can help individuals work smarter. It is aimed directly at the end users - learners. Most people use technology everyday. Using it smarter can help people be more productive, more organised and more creative.
  • Designing Information well can make the difference between making it accessible or inaccessible to othersSerif or Sans Serif Fonts
  • Changing your default text size and style to a more accessible sans serif font means that anytime you open the word document the computer will select the font style and size you have changed the default to.Provide a demonstration of how changing to change the default text size and style to a more accessible sans serif font.Select the home tab, click on the tont dialogue box on the bottom right hand corner of the font pane, select your preferred font size, style and then select set as default.
  • Colour can make a difference – black on white, yellow on blue, blue on yellow. If learners have scotopic sensitivity then being able to change the colour of what they read makes a massive difference to them.
  • JISC Techdis Toolboxwww.jisctechdis.ac.uk/tbx/
  • Right click your image and select size (or in some cases format).Choose the tab alt text.Add an alt text that describes the image.
  • Providing alternative formats in a way that is simple for staff to do and (if furnished with the appropriate information), can provide students with the capacity to save their own course materials as mp3
  • Balabolka is a Russian word that means “chatterer”.  Balabolka is also very good free text-to-speech software for the PC, running in all versions of Windows–from  Windows 2000 through Windows 7.  There are two versions of the program, one that is installed on a host computer, and a portable version that will run from a USB flash drive.Balabolka is available in the following 15 languages:  English; Bulgarian; Chinese, Czech; Dutch; French; German; Hungarian; Italian; Polish; Brazilian Portuguese; Romanian; Russian; Spanish; Ukrainian.
  • Jing http://TeacherTrainingVideos.com/Jing/index.htmlScreenr http://TeacherTrainingVideos.com/screenr/index.htmlCam Studio - http://camstudio.org/
  • Techdis Xerte Fridays online training -http://tinyurl.com/dyqbxw6Mitchell Media - http://mitchellmedia.co.uk/resources/xerte
  • Adobe Reader allows the user to change the background and font colour of a document according to personal preference - this may be particularly useful for learners with disabilities such as dyslexia, as it allows them to reduce or increase the contrast between the background and the text. To change the font:From the menu select Edit > Preferences and select the 'Accessibility' tab from the left hand menu.Tick the checkbox 'Replace Document Colours' (see Figure 1) and select the appropriate background and text colours.
  • Adobe Reader has an inbuilt Read Out Loud function.To access this function, navigate to View > Read Out Loud > Activate Read Out Loud Once the Read Out Loud function has been activated, the user has a number of options.In order to read short paragraphs of content, use the cursor to select a block of text and have the contents read out. To read a single page of text navigate to View > Read Out Loud > Read This Page OnlyTo read the entire document navigate to View > Read Out Loud > Read To End of Document
  • These will reiterate what Margaret has said and will show how the principles are, and can be applied to Moodle.
  • Is Moodle Accessible?Video of Al Puzzuoli: Resource centre for persons with disabilitiesMoodle Accessibility Test - Michigan State Universityhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDGDnLh5QVA
  • Is Moodle Accessible?It’s built to standards and guidelines set byWorld Wide Web Consortium (W3C) - International community that develops open standards to ensure the long-term growth of the Web.Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) - Documents explaining how to make Web content more accessible to people with disabilities.-----------------------------------------------Al found it accessible and to ensure accessibility Moodle build to guidelines (explain guidelines)Therefore contains elements that are accessible - Turn off stylesheetsetcHowever, these guidelines are created for people who are web developers and builders (not necessarily disabled)The sites are run through tools that check their compliance with the guidelines.
  • Is Moodle Accessible?“Knowledgeablehuman evaluation is required to determine if a site is accessible.”Open University (OU)This accessibility specification has been developed by accessibility experts and Moodle developers at the OU.http://docs.moodle.org/dev/Moodle_Accessibility_SpecificationMoodle Bug TrackerAllows users to submit any problems. Check with local admin and forums first.http://moodle.org/forums/http://tracker.moodle.org/---------------------------------------------------------There are no tools that can properly evaluate a site. Simply checklist of compliance.Quote from WAIBig player is OU creating a specification, and constantly improving Moodle, they have no option. Their platform must be accessible.What if you have a problem?There are many workarounds available, but if there’s something that just doesn’t work for a disabled user…
  • Making your course accessible- Simple consistent layout- Match lesson structure- Use Moodle/Web Styles--------------------------------------------------Ensure yourmoodle units and courses are simple and consistent, that means consistent with your lesson structure and consistent with other moodle units that the student may be studyingUse Moodle/Web styles, you may ask what web or Moodle styles are…. IMAGES then DEMO explain how same principles as word.
  • Images showing Moodle’s definition of header styles.Where they can change/add their own header styles.Mention list items
  • Image showing course set up with header styles, and additional header styles
  • Making your course accessible- Alt text for images- Consistent, descriptive labels- Consistent, descriptive filenames----------------------------------------------------------------Moodle almost forces you to add alt tags now, but think about your image, is it enhancing the course, when an impaired user accesses it are they getting the same information?When you create your course be consistent throughout it, but be consistent with how you list your items also. Describe them, make sure the filenames match the descriptions as best possible.
  • Images showing adding alt text to images and showing consistent files names and labels
  • Making your course accessible- Inform of pop-ups- Hide/Remove unused blocks- Carefully consider your use of colour----------------------------------------------------------Explain different schools of thoughtIf a user will be taken out of your course make sure they know this before they clickHide/Remove unused blocks some people hide this just collapses your block, remove takes it away from the page but there may need to be discussion with your Moodle adminCarefully consider your use of colour, does it add for the fully sighted user, does it hinder the non sighted user?
  • Additional Moodle accessibility- Moodle accessibility block- ATBar----------------------------------------------------------------Although all these precautions and steps have been taken by you and the Moodle developers you can’t be sure that something wont crop up.Some measures to help with these are the Moodle accessibility block already on the UWS Moodle.And the AT toolbar, comes attached to the access block, has additional options and more user control.
  • Web accessibility also benefits people without disabilities. For example, a key principle of Web accessibility is designing Web sites and software that are flexible to meet different user needs, preferences, and situations. This flexibility also benefits people without disabilities in certain situations, such as people using a slow Internet connection, people with "temporary disabilities" such as a broken arm, and people with changing abilities due to aging
  • Euroblind - The voice of blind and partially sighted people in Europehttp://www.euroblind.org/resources/guidelinesSAIF - http://www.saifscotland.org.uk/JISC Techdis - http://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/techdis/userneeds/seamlesssupportRNIB Accessible Information - http://tinyurl.com/yceghemPlain English Campaign - http://www.plainenglish.co.uk/free-guides.html
  • JISC TechDis – Accessibility Essentials (MS Office 2003 and 2007)http://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/AccessibilityEssentials/Creating Accessible Microsoft Office Documents in MS Office 2010http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLpHhi_W2rsJISC Techdis Toolboxhttp://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/tbxEdukatetodd - Creating Accessible PDFs with Microsoft Wordhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlWWwDkYNk8
  • Justifying text http://tinyurl.com/bn7m6soAdding alternative text to images in Word 2010 http://tinyurl.com/dx2umvnAdding alternative text to images in Word 2007http://tinyurl.com/cmk7xwsChecking the colour contrast of imageshttp://tinyurl.com/6uvt2hvChanging background colour of word documents in MS Word 2010http://tinyurl.com/ccs4t22Changing background colour of word documents in MS Word 2007http://tinyurl.com/cfv8vm2
  • Choosing accessible font styles and general good practice with fonts (two videos) in Word 2010http://tinyurl.com/cdnt5lzChoosing accessible font styles in Word 2007http://tinyurl.com/cs2w4nkCreating heading styles to create an accessible document structurehttp://tinyurl.com/cdnt5lz and http://tinyurl.com/d3pb7cz Using navigation pane to view document headingshttp://tinyurl.com/bvad9vg Adjusting line spacing in Wordhttp://tinyurl.com/bolzswjChoosing suitable images and some of the things you need to consider in Microsoft Word http://tinyurl.com/cmer7ep and http://tinyurl.com/c2nrq8n
  • How to add hyperlinks to link to other documents Word 2010http://tinyurl.com/d4cwbjuAdding screen tips to hyperlinks to make them more accessiblehttp://tinyurl.com/c3cglqv
  • Creating Learning Resources and Exploring the Accessibility Features of MoodleMargaret McKay and John MaguireJISC RSC Scotland
  • Transcript

    • 1. Creating Inclusive Learning Resources and Exploring theAccessibility Features of Moodle Margaret McKay and John Maguire JISC RSC Scotland
    • 2. Fionnuala MargaretCarmichael Gráinne McKay HamiltonManager Accessibility & e-Assessment InclusionKirsty Theresa CelesteMenzies Duffy McLaughlinSenior Higher StaffAdministrator Education DevelopmentJohnMaguire Mark Clark Joan WalkerLearning Infrastructure & Learning &Technologist Systems Teaching Royce McKie Penny Robertson Learning & Teaching Learning Resources
    • 3. How do you know if the information you create is accessible? • Text • Layout • Colour • Images • Styles
    • 4. A question for you A typical group of 1st year studentswere asked about difficulties that they experienced with written course work on a day to day basis. What barriers do you think they highlighted?
    • 5. • Blurred/fuzzy print.• Headaches/discomfort if text too close together.• Strong/bold print leaves a shadow.• Lose place on line.• Small print.• Document not accessible with my assistive technology.• Vocabulary difficult/unfamiliar.• Long document difficult to follow.• Forget if sentences long.• Time to read/take notes.
    • 6. Model of Accessibility Maturity Where are you?
    • 7. Accessibility Essentials Making Material More Accessible1. Font style and size2. Font colour and contrast3. Structuring documents4. Use of hyperlinks and using tooltips5. Appropriate use of images http://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/AccessibilityEssentials
    • 8. Techdis Toolbox http://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/tbx/home• The TechDis Toolbox is a collection of resources for people with disabilities or difficulties which give useful hints and tips on technologies that can help individuals work smarter.• It is aimed directly at the end users - learners.• Most people use technology everyday. Using it smarter can help people be more productive, more organised and more creative. (6.49)
    • 9. Accessible Font StylesSerif Font Styles are less accessibleTimes New Roman (abc DEF)Sans Serif Fonts Styles are more accessibleTrebuchet (abc DEF)Comic Sans (abc DEF)Arial (abc DEF)Verdana (abc DEF)Helvetica (abc DEF)Geneva (abc DEF)
    • 10. Serif or Sans Serif Fonts
    • 11. Good Practice with Font Styles• Text should be no smaller than 12 point.• Use 1.5 line spacing - see the difference line spacing can make.• Underlining of large volumes of text should be avoided as the readability is significantly decreased.• DON’T WRITE WHOLE SENTENCES IN CAPITALS. (This can be undone by pressing shift and F3)• Don’t use italics; consider using bold instead.• Ensure all text is left aligned, not justified - see examples of unjustified and justified margins
    • 12. Changing your default text size and style to a more accessible sans serif font
    • 13. Colour
    • 14. Colour can make a differencePage layout tab > colour > change colour to suit visual preferences
    • 15. Changing background colours in a word document www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/tbx/
    • 16. Don’t use colour alone to convey information Example 1: Page requiring colour perception to identify information
    • 17. Images Adding alt text to images provides information for assistive technology users• Right click your image and select format.• Choose the format picture/alt text.• Add an alt text that describes the image.
    • 18. Adding alt text to images provides information for assistive technology users
    • 19. Alt Text Descriptions “It’s important to have description of images to help a visually impaired person imagine what “Alt text gives me that image could be“ the idea of what the image, is not just a massive gap when the screen reader is readingJennifer - screen reader user back.“ 2nd year university student
    • 20. Why add alt texts?
    • 21. Using ImagesWhen usingimagesIt is worthchecking thecolour ingreyscaleto determine howaccessible itWould be ifphotocopiedor if viewedby a student whowas using screenreading software.
    • 22. Activity 5 minutes1. Open the word document on your desktop called ‘Activity’ and move to page 2 where you will see an image.2. Add an alt text to this image.
    • 23. Structuring Documents Microsoft ® Word has an inbuilt structuring system forheading styles which should be used when creating any document
    • 24. Accessibility Benefits of Using Heading Styles Follow this link for an example of a well structured documentNote how easy it is to navigate the structured document using heading styles.
    • 25. “Without heading Heading Stylesstyles in electronic documents, it is difficult for me to “As a screen read & often I am reader user it is the one spending important for me time making my to have heading course work structure in a accessible “ Word document.“ “very time consuming scrolling down continuously not knowing and listening to information you don’t want to know about. “ Jennifer - screen reader user nd 2 year university student
    • 26. Well Structured Documents: Why?Follow this link to hear a screen reader user talk about the importance of well structured documents
    • 27. Well designed heading styles can be used to create a table of contentsClick on the image to see an animation on how to insert a Table of Contents (TechDis)
    • 28. ActivityOpen the word document on your desktop called ‘Activity’ – Add heading structures to the unstructured word document on your desktop. – View your document using the document map. – Add a table of contents. – Example
    • 29. How do you add your hyperlinks?UWS Enabling Supporthttp://www.uws.ac.uk/about-uws/services-for-students/student-support/disability-support/disability-support/What do you think about this hyperlink?How could you make it more accessible? See JISC Techdis Toolbox for more guidance
    • 30. HyperlinksWhere would you add the hyperlink in thisdescription? Click here for more information about Jupiter
    • 31. Hyperlinks should make sense out of contextEspecially important for screen reader users who canopt to listen to hyperlinks as a summary of information.The links need to make sense out of context.• Click here for Topic List.• Click here for Topic List.• Click here for Topic List.
    • 32. Text to Speech Providing alternative formats in a way that is simple for staff to do and (if furnished with the appropriateinformation), can provide students with the capacity to save their own course materials as mp3
    • 33. PortableText to Speech Balabolka is a very good free Windows text-to-speech tool. It includes magnification (2X to 16X) and spell checking. It is also keyboard accessible. This software will create audio files on an iPod or other mobile device. Watch the tutorial
    • 34. RoboBrailleWeb based text to speech http://www.robobraille.org/online Watch a video about RoboBraille http://bit.ly/abkbz6 * With RoboBraille you can save to MP3 or Digital Talking Book/DAISY Format
    • 35. Using ScreencastsCam Studio - http://camstudio.org/Jing http://TeacherTrainingVideos.com/Jing/index.htmlScreenrhttp://TeacherTrainingVideos.com/screenr/index.html
    • 36. The Accessibility Benefits of PDFsPortability• Can be downloaded for use at thelearner’s convenience.• Can be transferred to portable devices.ConsistencyLooks the same on screen and printed.AccessibilityDocuments can be read without the needto buy Microsoft Word or otherproprietary software (if the readerdoesnt’t have this application).PersonalisationWith Adobe Reader there are manyaccessibility options to personalise howPDFs are accessed.
    • 37. Saving a Word document to PDF
    • 38. Document Navigation when converted to PDF• If a document has been structured correctly, users can view a hierarchical list of bookmarks allowing them to quickly locate the relevant information within a document.• To open the bookmarks within a PDF navigate to View > Navigation Panels > Bookmarks or click on the Bookmarks icon on the left of the screen.• If available, the bookmarks will open on the left of the screen.
    • 39. Adobe Reader-free software that will read back your PDF File From a users viewpoint the following functionalities in Adobe Reader offers the following benefits:• The ability to navigate via bookmarks.• The ability to magnify text.• The ability to reflow text• The ability to change the text and background colours.• The ability to automatically scroll through the document and therefore read it without mouse interaction.
    • 40. Personalised Font and Background Colours• Adobe Reader allows the user to change the background and font colour of a document according to personal preference.• From the menu select Edit > Preferences and select the Accessibility tab from the left hand menu.• Tick the checkbox Replace Document Colours
    • 41. Enlarging the Text Size• Adobe® Reader allows the user to enlarge the text using the zoom function.• To access the zoom utilise the zoom tool and options from the Select and Zoom toolbar.• Alternatively, navigate to View > Zoom > Zoom To and select the appropriate magnification value from the dialogue box• Using the Reflow function will avoid the need for horizontal scrolling when the text is magnified
    • 42. Read Out Loud• Adobe Reader has an inbuilt Read Out Loud function.• To access this function, navigate to View > Read Out Loud > Activate Read Out Loud• Once the Read Out Loud function has been activated, the user has a number of options.• In order to read short paragraphs of content, use the cursor to select a block of text and have the contents read out.• To read a single page of text navigate to View > Read Out Loud > Read This Page Only• To read the entire document navigate to View > Read Out Loud > Read To End of Document
    • 43. Moodle and Accessibility
    • 44. Is Moodle Accessible?Built to standards and guidelines World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) International community that develops open standards to ensure the long-term growth of the Web. Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) Documents explaining how to make Web content more accessible to people with disabilities.
    • 45. Is Moodle Accessible?“Knowledgeable human evaluation isrequired to determine if a site is accessible.”Open University (OU)This accessibility specification has been developed by accessibilityexperts and Moodle developers at the OU.http://docs.moodle.org/dev/Moodle_Accessibility_SpecificationMoodle Bug TrackerAllows users to submit any problems. Check with local admin andforums first.http://moodle.org/forums/http://tracker.moodle.org/ W3C Web Accessibility Initiative: http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/accessibility.php (Accessed: 15 August 2012)
    • 46. Making your course accessible• Simple consistent layout• Match lesson structure• Use Moodle/Web Styles
    • 47. H1 H2 H3http://school.demo.moodle.net/
    • 48. H1 H2 H3 H4 H4http://school.demo.moodle.net/
    • 49. Making your course accessible• Alt text for images• Consistent, descriptive labels• Consistent, descriptive filenames
    • 50. Making your course accessible• Inform of pop-ups• Hide/Remove unused blocks• Carefully consider your use of colour
    • 51. Additional Moodle accessibility• Moodle accessibility block• ATBarhttp://moodle.uws.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=32
    • 52. Why make it accessible?“Web accessibility also benefitspeople without disabilities.” W3C Web Accessibility Initiative: http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/accessibility.php (Accessed: 15 August 2012)
    • 53. References•SAIF - http://www.saifscotland.org.uk/•JISC Techdis -http://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/techdis/userneeds/seamlesssupport•RNIB Accessible Information - http://tinyurl.com/yceghem•Plain English Campaign - http://www.plainenglish.co.uk/free-guides.html•Euroblind - The voice of blind and partially sighted people inEuropehttp://www.euroblind.org/resources/guidelines
    • 54. Useful LinksJISC TechDis – Accessibility Essentials (MS Office 2003 and 2007)http://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/AccessibilityEssentials/Creating Accessible Microsoft Office Documents in MS Office 2010http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLpHhi_W2rsJISC Techdis Toolboxhttp://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/tbxEdukatetodd - Creating Accessible PDFs with Microsoft Wordhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlWWwDkYNk8
    • 55. Useful Links• Justifying text http://tinyurl.com/bn7m6so• Adding alternative text to images in Word 2010 http://tinyurl.com/dx2umvn• Adding alternative text to images in Word 2007 http://tinyurl.com/cmk7xws• Checking the colour contrast of imageshttp://tinyurl.com/6uvt2hv• Changing background colour of word documents in MS Word 2010http://tinyurl.com/ccs4t22• Changing background colour of word documents in MS Word 2007http://tinyurl.com/cfv8vm2
    • 56. Useful Links• Choosing accessible font styles and general good practice with fonts (two videos) in Word 2010 http://tinyurl.com/cdnt5lz• Choosing accessible font styles in Word 2007 http://tinyurl.com/cs2w4nk• Creating heading styles to create an accessible document structurehttp://tinyurl.com/cdnt5lz and http://tinyurl.com/d3pb7cz• Using navigation pane to view document headingshttp://tinyurl.com/bvad9vg• Adjusting line spacing in Word http://tinyurl.com/bolzswj• Choosing suitable images and some of the things you need to consider in Microsoft Word http://tinyurl.com/cmer7ep and http://tinyurl.com/c2nrq8n
    • 57. Useful Links• How to add hyperlinks to link to other documents Word 2010http://tinyurl.com/d4cwbju• Adding screen tips to hyperlinks to make them more accessiblehttp://tinyurl.com/c3cglqv
    • 58. Creating Learning Resources and Exploring the Accessibility Features of Moodle Margaret McKay margaret.mckay@glasgow.ac.uk John Maguire john.maguire@glasgow.ac.uk