Jisc RSC Eastern e-Learning and the Common Inspection Framework Nov 2012 Presentation

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e-Learning and the Common Inspection Framework Presentation

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  • Appendix 1: 2: Impact & OfSTEDOfSTED use Impact 13 times in the Handbook and not at all int he Framework; suggesting the Framework is mainly about interventions and the Handbook is out outcomes.‘greatest impact’ is the pronoun used most times. ‘Successful’ impact is used in terms of teaching & learning, suggesting any positive vcontributions are evaluated on the contribution to excellent teaching, learning and assessment.Trends and patterns are evidenced by ‘monitoring impact’.Impact is seen mainly as summative and retrospective, not formative and showing potential.Impact is not evidence of action, but evidence of successful action.
  • Appendix 1: 2: Impact & OfSTEDOfSTED use Impact 13 times in the Handbook and not at all int he Framework; suggesting the Framework is mainly about interventions and the Handbook is out outcomes.‘greatest impact’ is the pronoun used most times. ‘Successful’ impact is used in terms of teaching & learning, suggesting any positive vcontributions are evaluated on the contribution to excellent teaching, learning and assessment.Trends and patterns are evidenced by ‘monitoring impact’.Impact is seen mainly as summative and retrospective, not formative and showing potential.Impact is not evidence of action, but evidence of successful action.
  • Jisc RSC Eastern e-Learning and the Common Inspection Framework Nov 2012 Presentation

    1. 1. What do learning technologies offer education How might we present that offer What do we want to get from our colleagues What does that say about us as learning technology enthusiasts Modern Learning Introduction e-learning headings OfSTED headings Headline themes Telling stories Impact Confident teachers What we do To access a Course Reader go to: www.tinyurl.com/rebbeck1 This is a personal view and not that of OfSTED, JISC or anyone else. Geoff Rebbeck grebbeck@me.com 1
    2. 2. Modern Learning Digital Literacy Personalisation Collaborative learning Divergent thinking Pace & Progression The Learner Voice Tutor Confidence Beyond the classroom Vision & Leadership Reputation 2
    3. 3. 6 interesting ideas for learning technologists 1. The centrality of assessment techniques to inform good learning and therefore effective teaching 2. Personalisation of the learning experience and the learner experience 3. The movement of the management of learning towards the learner from the teacher 4. Great teaching and learning also occurs outside the traditional classroom 5. Imagination, exploration and reflection are valid teacher actions in attempting to improve teaching, learning and assessment 6. Judgement is based on summative Impact (not good intentions) 3
    4. 4. Characteristics of Improving ‘colleges’ •Good internal communication •Data is well managed in that it is immediate, accurate and gives early warning of slip •Teaching staff are accountable for effectiveness and supporting each other •The ‘college’ has a good reputation •The ‘college’ has effective leadership ‘The further education college sector, complemented by independent and adult community learning providers, is of crucial importance to youth employment, adult skills, economic recovery and, indeed, social cohesion. The learning and skills sector needs re-orientating towards a moral determination to provide high quality and relevant provision, which should include reputable apprenticeship opportunities for young people. This is an urgent and major challenge for the system.’ Sir Michael Wilshaw HM. Chief Inspector. OfSTED Annual report 28th. November 2012 at http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/annualreport1112 4
    5. 5. The three laws of impact if Sir Isaac Newton had been an e-learning champion instead….. First Law Momentum in teaching remains constant until someone tries something different Second Law The amount of energy and enthusiasm in effecting change will only have effect when it is stronger than the desire to hold the status quo Third Law Without commitment to doing something different there is no consequence
    6. 6. The double-negative statement What would not have happened if we hadn’t done this If we had not introduced www.wallwisher.com students would not have had a voice to express opinions. If we had not introduced www.wallwisher.com students would not have had a place to express an immediate opinion If we had not introduced www.wallwisher.com students would not have had a place to share their opinions with other learners immediately
    7. 7. Thinking through a causal link Ask your intended target to provide evidence of the benefit 7
    8. 8. The double-negative statement What would not have happened if we hadn’t done this A Learner Entitlement If we had not introduced Moodle, 20 of our students on long term sickness during the term would not have been able to stay on course and on track. (entitlement 4) If we had not set up a campus wide WIFI system, students would not have been able use their own devices to support teaching & learning (entitlement 6)
    9. 9. Laws of Impact Geoff’s Rules of Impact: •Impact is an intervention that attempts to alter the natural or settled course of things 1.Impact can be an intervention that accelerates the natural progression 2.When making an impact through technology, it is the enabler, not the target 3.Impact statements must include ‘technology in action’ 4.Impact must be aimed at a minimum of one person 5.Impact must have an underlying reason or purpose in one or other statement 6.Statements are always written with a positive inference, that the target person confirms by degree 7.Consequences of impact will always include the intended, unintended & the unforeseen
    10. 10. Observations on OfSTED & Impact •OfSTED use ‘impact’ 13 times in the Handbook and not at all in the Framework; suggesting the Framework is mainly about interventions and the Handbook is about outcomes. •‘greatest’ impact is the adjective used most times. ‘Successful’ impact is used in terms of teaching & learning, suggesting any positive contributions are evaluated on the contribution to excellent teaching, learning and assessment. •Trends and patterns are evidenced by ‘monitoring impact’. •Impact is seen mainly as summative and retrospective, not formative and showing potential. •Impact is not evidence of action, but evidence of successful action.
    11. 11. credo |ˈkrēdō, ˈkrādō| noun ( pl. credos ) a statement of the beliefs or aims that guide someone's actions: he announced his credo in his first editorial. • ( Credo )a creed of the Christian Church in Latin. • ( Credo )a musical setting of the Nicene Creed, typically as part of a mass. ORIGIN Middle English: Latin,‘I believe.’ Compare with creed. 11 11
    12. 12. Why is having confident teaching staff so important? 1. We need all staff members to develop their potential to be more effective in their professional life and day to day practice as part of the larger developing workforce and that the use of technologies that provide personal reflection space and by supporting each other makes this possible. 2. A developing workforce is one that recognises the constant challenge of the new and possesses the imagination to apply the properties of technology to purposeful and effective teaching and learning and personal development to deal with these changes with confidence. 3. A developed workforce is one that tackles changing and uncertain circumstances with confidence 4. A confident workforce is one that is not afraid of the challenges new technologies may bring to their practices and is able to modify their work and its context to take advantage of the affordances of new technology 12
    13. 13. We are all digitally indigenous Higher level thinking 1 Drive to think & work flexibly Description The ability to use technology in different ways than originally covered in training or the Manual. Making technology bring learning to life. Personalising learning through the use of technology 2 Ability to adapt technology to The ability to make technology genuinely contribute to learning for purposeful pedagogy learners rather than seeing technology as an end in itself. This includes widening participation, increasing retention, particularly amongst hardto-reach learners 3 Vision to create imaginative Learning and demonstrating the skill of redesigning teaching and blended learning design learning by blending in technology to other forms and methods of teaching and learning. This refers to skills developed through practice and engagement with peers and learners rather than in formal sessions or using formal learning resources 4 Curiosity to involve learners in The Learner Voice. Involving learners in the design and personalising of curriculum delivery & design learning. Student e-learning monitors in classes. Involving learners in the experience of learning in the widest sense 5 Imagination to develop future Using technology in helping learners to develop management of their learning plans own journey, to account for their learning and plan future learning. Improving the tutorial process, making learning more relevant to the needs of each individual learner 13
    14. 14. What do learning technologies offer education How might we present that offer What do we want to get from our colleagues What does that say about us as learning technology enthusiasts Modern Learning Introduction e-learning headings OfSTED headings Headline themes Telling stories Impact Confident teachers What we do To access a Course Reader go to: www.tinyurl.com/rebbeck1 This is a personal view and not that of OfSTED, JISC or anyone else. Geoff Rebbeck grebbeck@me.com 14

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