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California

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California California Presentation Transcript

  • CaliforniaRyan Ross
  • CHAPTER 1. QUEEN CALIFA’S ISLAND
    • California was first discovered by Spanish explorer Hernan Cortez in 1533.
    • It was originally thought to be an island and was named after a mythical Amazon queen named Califa who lived on an island.
    • In 1539 it was discovered that California was a peninsula and not an island and a great land mass north of the peninsula was waiting to be settled.
  • CHAPTER 1. QUEEN CALIFA’S ISLAND
    • The North American and Pacific tectonic plates’ collision is what makes California into the diverse state that it is, from valley to mountain to desert and coastline.
    • Home to Mt. Whitney, the tallest mountain in the continental United States.
    • Just to the east of Mt. Whitney is Death Valley, which is the lowest point in the continental U.S. at 282 ft. below sea level.
    • It’s coastline is 1,264 miles long taking up more than half of the west coast of the United States.
  • CHAPTER 1. QUEEN CALIFA’S ISLAND
    • There where many groups of Native Americans in California before the arrival of European explorers. They had 22 different linguistic families and 135 separate languages.
    • Their diets varied depending on where they lived and included acorns, shell fish, trout, salmon, etc.
    • They were generally peaceful with their surrounding tribal neighbors due to the abundance of food and resources in the area.
  • CHAPTER 4. STRIKING IT RICH
    On February 2, 1848 Mexico and the U.S. signed the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo making California apart of the United States.
    The northern states wanted to make California a free state and the south wanted to break up the state into territories so they could have a piece and make theirs a slave state. Congress did not give into what the south wanted.
    Alcalde law, similar to a Militant law, was the initial practice of government in California until the start of the gold rush when a population boom occurs.
  • CHAPTER 4. STRIKING IT RICH
    In 1848 James Marshall finds gold at Fort Sutter and starts the California gold rush of 1849.
    As a result of the population boom during the gold rush, murder rates raise to an extreme amount, especially in Los Angeles to a rate of 1,240 per 100,000, which is an all time record in America to this day.
  • CHAPTER 4. STRIKING IT RICH
    As in most of America at the time, racial issues where present in California as well. Many lynchings took place to quell the rising crime in California, however, Mexicans where executed in drastically grater number than any other race.
    There was also a tax imposed on any foreigner in the minefields of $20 per month which drove thousands of Mexicans away from the mines.
  • CHAPTER 7. GREAT EXPECTATIONS
    • In the 1890’s infrastructure in California began. The most pressing issue was water.
    • A drainage act was passed in 1887 to gather funds for irrigation and drainage which the state was able to collect $100,000.
    • William Hammond Hall was the state engineer in charge of surveying the state’s water and disperse it correctly.
    • Hall helped Southern California divert water from the Colorado River into the Salton Sink.
  • CHAPTER 7. GREAT EXPECTATIONS
    • William Mulholland was the head of the Department of Water and Power in the city of Los Angeles during 1886-1923.
    • He was responsible for acquiring water for Los Angeles by making aqueducts and dams to obtain water from the Owens River.
    • In 1923 the St. Francis Dam broke just hours after he personally inspected it which ended his career as a city engineer.
  • CHAPTER 4. GREAT EXPECTATIONS
    • In the 1890’s there was an effort started in San Francisco to improve the architecture of the city.
    • Willis Polk was an American architect that came to San Francisco from Jacksonville, Illinois. Polk build commercial and residential buildings before and after the earthquake of 1906. The James C. Flood Mansion is one example of his works located on Nob Hill.