Sentence Building

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This powerpoint explores the various possiblilities of sentence construction simply by varying the order of the noun, verb, object and qualifiers.

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  • Please note: This slideshow was based upon the work of Robert Ian Scott. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb6405/is_4_57/ai_n28810981/?tag=content;col1
    I wish to recognize his valuable contribution to writing in the English language.
    R. Robert
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Sentence Building

  1. 1. SVOQ S ubject – V erb – O bject - Q ualifier Sentence Builder Click on the links to use this presentation Created by Randy Robert June 2006 Copyright - Credenda Virtual High School
  2. 2. Subject – V – O - Q <ul><li>Subjects are usually: </li></ul><ul><li>nouns , pronouns or noun phrases . </li></ul><ul><li>Subjects answers the questions: Who? or What? </li></ul><ul><li>They tell who or what the sentence is about. </li></ul><ul><li>Who?- Men …. or - She …. or - An old man… </li></ul><ul><li>What?- Trucks …. or - It …. or - The blue truck… </li></ul>
  3. 3. S – Verb – O - Q <ul><li>S V </li></ul><ul><li>Sharona runs. </li></ul><ul><li>A verb or verb phrase is the action part of the sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>It answers the questions: Does or did what? </li></ul><ul><li>It describes the action of the subject. In other words the subject does or did what ? </li></ul><ul><li>As described: </li></ul><ul><li>The subject does or did what? </li></ul><ul><li>The truck rolled. </li></ul><ul><li>In some cases the verb does not show action and is a linking verb. </li></ul><ul><li>The subject (is or was) (followed by a completer) </li></ul>
  4. 4. S – V – Object - Q <ul><li>The object receives the action of the subject as described by the verb. </li></ul><ul><li>S V O </li></ul><ul><li>Tom kissed Mary. </li></ul><ul><li>The Object answers the questions: </li></ul><ul><li>To Whom? or To What? </li></ul><ul><li>The object is usually a noun or noun phrase . </li></ul><ul><li>As described: </li></ul><ul><li>The subject does or did what to whom or to what. </li></ul><ul><li>The dog bit his master. </li></ul>
  5. 5. S – V – O - Qualifier <ul><li>The qualifier describes the action described by the verb. </li></ul><ul><li>S V O Q </li></ul><ul><li>Martha threw the stone angrily. </li></ul><ul><li>The qualifier answers the questions: </li></ul><ul><li>When? Where? How? Why? </li></ul><ul><li>As described: </li></ul><ul><li>The Subject does or did what to whom or what when, where, how or why. </li></ul><ul><li>Mary raced her sister to the barn. </li></ul>
  6. 6. S – V – Completer <ul><li>The completer is used to show the result, or description of a linking verb or state of being verb on the subject. </li></ul><ul><li>S V C </li></ul><ul><li>Sean was lonely. </li></ul><ul><li>Jay is angry. </li></ul>
  7. 7. SVOQ S ubject – V erb – O bject - Q ualifier Susan passed the puck swiftly. How many ways can a simple sentence be constructed? Or How many ways can something be said? Transmogrify  --Click here
  8. 8. S V O Q <ul><li>S ubject – V erb – Q ualifier - O bject </li></ul><ul><li>Susan passed swiftly the puck. </li></ul>
  9. 9. S O Q V <ul><li>S ubject – O bject - Q ualifier –- V erb </li></ul><ul><li>Susan the puck swiftly passed. </li></ul>
  10. 10. S V Q O <ul><li>S ubject – V erb – Q ualifier - O bject </li></ul><ul><li>Susan passed swiftly the puck. </li></ul>
  11. 11. S V O Q <ul><li>S ubject – V erb – O bject - Q ualifier </li></ul><ul><li>Susan passed the puck swiftly. </li></ul>
  12. 12. S Q V O <ul><li>S ubject - Q ualifier – V erb – O bject </li></ul><ul><li>Susan swiftly passed the puck. </li></ul>
  13. 13. S O V Q <ul><li>S ubject – O bject – V erb - Q ualifier </li></ul><ul><li>Susan the puck passed swiftly. </li></ul>
  14. 14. S Q O V <ul><li>S ubject - Q ualifier – O bject – V erb </li></ul><ul><li>Susan swiftly the puck passed. </li></ul>
  15. 15. O S V Q <ul><li>O bject – S ubject – V erb - Q ualifier </li></ul><ul><li>The puck Susan passed swiftly. </li></ul>
  16. 16. O V Q S <ul><li>O bject - V erb - Q ualifier – S ubject </li></ul><ul><li>The puck passed swiftly Susan. </li></ul>
  17. 17. O Q S V <ul><li>O bject - Q ualifier – S ubject – V erb </li></ul><ul><li>The puck swiftly Susan passed. </li></ul>
  18. 18. O S Q V <ul><li>O bject - S ubject - Q ualifier – V erb </li></ul><ul><li>The puck Susan swiftly passed. </li></ul>
  19. 19. O Q V S <ul><li>O bject - Q ualifier – V erb – S ubject </li></ul><ul><li>The puck swiftly passed Susan. </li></ul>
  20. 20. O V S Q <ul><li>O bject – V erb – S ubject - Q ualifier </li></ul><ul><li>The puck passed Susan swiftly. </li></ul>
  21. 21. V S O Q <ul><li>V erb – S ubject – O bject - Q ualifier </li></ul><ul><li>Passed Susan the puck swiftly. </li></ul>
  22. 22. V O Q S <ul><li>V erb – O bject - Q ualifier - S ubject </li></ul><ul><li>Passed the puck swiftly Susan. </li></ul>
  23. 23. V Q S O <ul><li>V erb - Q ualifier – S ubject – O bject </li></ul><ul><li>Passed swiftly Susan the puck. </li></ul>
  24. 24. V S Q O <ul><li>V erb – S ubject - Q ualifier – O bject </li></ul><ul><li>Passed Susan swiftly the puck. </li></ul>
  25. 25. V Q O S <ul><li>V erb - Q ualifier – O bject – S ubject </li></ul><ul><li>Passed swiftly the puck Susan. </li></ul>
  26. 26. V O S Q <ul><li>V erb – O bject - S ubject – Q ualifier </li></ul><ul><li>Passed the puck Susan swiftly. </li></ul>
  27. 27. Q S V O <ul><li>Q ualifier - S ubject – V erb – O bject </li></ul><ul><li>Swiftly Susan passed the puck. </li></ul>
  28. 28. Q S O V <ul><li>Q ualifier – S ubject – O bject - V erb </li></ul><ul><li>Swiftly Susan the puck passed. </li></ul>
  29. 29. Q V O S <ul><li>Q ualifier - V erb – O bject - S ubject </li></ul><ul><li>Swiftly passed the puck Susan. </li></ul>
  30. 30. QVSO <ul><li>Q ualifier - V erb – S ubject – O bject </li></ul><ul><li>Swiftly passed Susan the puck. </li></ul>
  31. 31. QOSV <ul><li>Q ualifier – O bject - S ubject – V erb </li></ul><ul><li>Swiftly the puck Susan passed. </li></ul>
  32. 32. QOVS <ul><li>Q ualifier – O bject – V erb - S ubject </li></ul><ul><li>Swiftly the puck passed Susan. </li></ul>
  33. 33. S V O Q <ul><li>As you saw a 4 word sentence can make 24 different sentences. </li></ul><ul><li>You may also have noticed: </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes the meaning changed </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes the sentence was awkward </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes the sentence was hard to understand </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes the sentence sounded like Yoda </li></ul><ul><li>from Star Wars was talking </li></ul>
  34. 34. S V O Q <ul><li>Although some of the sentences were not acceptable, many were. Your ear will tell you if a sentence is correct or not. </li></ul><ul><li>As a writer, you can make your writing more interesting by varying your sentence structure. </li></ul><ul><li>If you can make 24 sentences from just 4 words, IMAGINE, what variety of sentences you can create with 8-10 words. </li></ul>
  35. 35. S V O Q <ul><li>Don’t be afraid to experiment. </li></ul><ul><li>Writing is a process of exploration. </li></ul><ul><li>Writing – editing – rewriting is a process. Get used to doing it! </li></ul><ul><li>Write about things you know. </li></ul>Home Improve Your Writing Document Link to Hypergrammar
  36. 36. Noun Phrase <ul><li>Often the noun is accompanied by other words – articles like (the, a) </li></ul><ul><li>Or with adjectives like (old, lonely) </li></ul><ul><li>These are called noun phrases . Examples are: </li></ul><ul><li>( The old man, A sweet puppy, Lonely people) </li></ul><ul><li>Lonely people seek friends. </li></ul>
  37. 37. Verb Phrase <ul><li>Verbs in sentences can stand alone, but sometimes they are verb phrases. I.e. </li></ul><ul><li>were being eaten </li></ul><ul><li>kept screaming </li></ul><ul><li>A verb phrase usually includes direct and indirect objects or any adverb, adverb phrases , or adverb clauses which happen to modify it </li></ul><ul><li>The predicate part of the sentence is always a verb phrase. </li></ul><ul><li>An example is: </li></ul><ul><li>We will meet at the library . </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li> Subject Predicate </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  38. 38. Qualifiers <ul><li>Qualifiers can take many forms: </li></ul><ul><li>Adverb Phrases (a prepositional adverb phrase in the example) </li></ul><ul><li>(She bought some spinach when she went to the corner store . ) </li></ul><ul><li>adverb </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The premier gave a speech here . </li></ul></ul><ul><li>adverb clause </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The premier gave a speech where the workers were striking . </li></ul></ul>
  39. 39. Completers (Subject Compliments) <ul><li>There is a third kind of verb called a linking verb . The word (or phrase ) which follows a linking verb is called not an object, but a subject complement . </li></ul><ul><li>The most common linking verb is &quot;be.&quot; Other linking verbs are &quot;become,&quot; &quot;seem,&quot; &quot;appear,&quot; &quot;feel,&quot; &quot;grow,&quot; &quot;look,&quot; &quot;smell,&quot; &quot;taste,&quot; and &quot;sound,&quot; among others. </li></ul><ul><li>Linking verb with subject complement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>He was a radiologist before he became a full-time yoga instructor. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Linking verb with subject complement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Your homemade chili smells delicious. </li></ul></ul>

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