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PSSA writing tips
PSSA writing tips
PSSA writing tips
PSSA writing tips
PSSA writing tips
PSSA writing tips
PSSA writing tips
PSSA writing tips
PSSA writing tips
PSSA writing tips
PSSA writing tips
PSSA writing tips
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PSSA writing tips

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Transcript

  • 1. PSSA Writing
  • 2. PSSA Test
    DAY 1: Multiple Choice
    Day 2: Essay Prompt
    Day 3: Essay Prompt
  • 3. Writing Rubric
    Focus
    single controlling point
    Content
    presence of ideas developed through facts, examples, ideas, details, stats, etc.
    Organization
    order developed and sustained within and across paragraphs with transition
    Conventions
    use of grammar, sentence structure and spelling
    Style
    choice, use and arrangement of words and sentence structure that create tone and voice
  • 4. STOP and think- FAPP
    Format
    What are you being asked to write? Speech? Letter? Essay?
    Audience
    To whom are you writing? What if you are not given an audience?
    Persona
    Who are you supposed to be?
    Purpose
    Persuade or inform?
  • 5. Organization
    Order developed and sustained within and between paragraphs?
    There is an intro and conclusion
    Logical Pattern:
    Chronological
    Most-to-Least Important
    Least-to-Most Important
    Spatial
    Cause/Effect
  • 6. Introduction
    Grab the readers attention.
    How does something you are reading grab your attention?
    Last sentences should be your thesis statement (main idea)
  • 7. Thesis (Main idea)
    The road map for your paper.
    It shows where you are going and how you plan to get there.
    If you start to get lost, pull over and read your thesis again to get back on track.
  • 8. Body
    Main points
    Supporting detail
    Transition, transition, transition!!!!!
  • 9. Example Transitions
    Time
    when, while, since, before, after, until, once
    Place
    where, wherever
    Cause
    because, since, as, now that, inasmuch as
    Condition
    if, unless, on condition that
    Contrast/Concession
    although, even though, despite, in spite of
    Adversative
    while, where, whereas
    Other
    that, which, who, whoever, whom, what, why, how...
  • 10. Conclusion:"Telling 'em what you told 'em"
    Restates your main idea.
    Your intro and thesis were the road map; however, your conclusion is the same road map with the trip complete. This means your thesis should be restated but not repeated, since a journey was completed since reading it.
  • 11. Style
    Humor
    Dialogue
    figurative language
    sensory details
    vivid verbs
    colorful adjectives and adverbs
    specific nouns
    a variety of sentence structure.
  • 12. Conventions
    Take a chance on a big word
    Watch the spelling of the most commonly used words.

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