Aldous Huxley

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Aldous Huxley

  1. 1. Aldous Huxley & Brave New World “ Oh, Brave New World that has such people in it!”
  2. 2. Aldous Huxley <ul><li>Born British but moved to California </li></ul><ul><li>Was a journalist and a symbolist poet early in his career </li></ul>
  3. 3. Aldous Huxley <ul><li>Became a “prophet of doom for the cult of the amusing”—moved away from realism to make ideas the central point in his stories </li></ul><ul><li>Scrutinized moral decadence of modern society’s effect on the “whole” man. (D.H. Lawrence?) </li></ul>
  4. 4. Aldous Huxley <ul><li>Brave New World (1932) abandoned his view of evil as a “mildly amusing social phenomenon” and identified it with materialism and sensuality </li></ul>
  5. 5. Aldous Huxley <ul><li>Wrote a pseudo-sequel— Brave New World Revisited , a diatribe against overpopulation and over consumption. </li></ul><ul><li>Died Nov. 22, 1963—the same day JFK was assassinated. </li></ul>
  6. 6. UTOPIA <ul><li>A fiction describing an ideal imaginary world. </li></ul><ul><li>From Sir Thomas More’s Utopia written in Latin in 1516 describing a perfect political state </li></ul><ul><li>Literally means “good place” </li></ul>
  7. 7. DYSTOPIA <ul><li>Literally “bad place” </li></ul><ul><li>Imaginary worlds, usually in the future, that are less than ideal </li></ul><ul><li>Present tendencies are carried out to their intensely unpleasant culminations </li></ul><ul><li>Most famous dystopic stories are George Orwell’s 1984, & Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Other dystopic novels and works: <ul><li>Harry Harrison’s Make Room! Make Room! ( Soylent Green) </li></ul>
  9. 9. Other dystopic novels and works: <ul><li>Phillip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (Blade Runner) </li></ul>
  10. 10. Other dystopic novels and works: <ul><li>William F. Nolan and George Clayton Johnson’s Logan’s Run </li></ul>
  11. 11. Other dystopic novels and works: <ul><li>Alan Moore and David Lloyd’s V for Vendetta </li></ul>
  12. 12. Other dystopic novels and works: <ul><li>The Matrix </li></ul>
  13. 13. NOBLE SAVAGE <ul><li>The idea that primitive human beings are naturally good and that whatever evil they develop is the product of the corrupting action of civilization. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Everything is well when it comes fresh from the hands of the Maker; everything degenerates in the hand of Man.” Rousseau </li></ul>
  14. 14. NOBLE SAVAGE <ul><li>Major works that include the noble savage: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Tarzan of the Apes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rudyard Kipling’s Mowgli </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Robert E. Howard’s Conan the Barbarian </li></ul></ul>

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