Rrfawaz

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  • Rrfawaz

    1. 1. CONSTRUCTIVISM THEORY R. Fawaz
    2. 2. PEOPLE OF CONSTRUCTIVISMoaks.nvg.org/jerome-bruner JeanPiaget.org Jean Piaget (1896-1980) Psychologist who observed children Felt they were active learners who are motivated on their own to learn Developed four cognitive stages of children Jerome Bruner (1915- ) Psychologist and educator who proposed learning is an active process Believes constructivist learners are participatory learners Students should learn in a variety of ways and activities Giambattista Vico 18th century philosopher and scientist Known for coining the word “constructivist”
    3. 3. PEOPLE OF CONSTRUCTIVISM CONT.Lev Vygotsky (1896-1934) Educational psychologist who developed social cognition Believed learning was influenced by social development Proposed that children have a zone of proximal development which is the difference between what the child has previously learned and the potential that the child has from working with a more skilled person Proponent of collaborative learning Felt teachers should discover each child’s level of cognitive/social developmentJohn Dewey (1859-1952 ) Educational psychologist, philosopher and activist who advocated child- centered instruction Believed education was a social process and school was a community Began the Laboratory School which was to be viewed as an extension of society where students have an active role
    4. 4. schuitema.co.za/blog KEY POINTS OF CONSTRUCTIVISM “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand”- Confucius Students learn by doing and practicing The learner forms, or constructs, the material taught Students learn actively and create their own representations of what they learned based on their past knowledges and experiences There is not one true definition of anything because knowledge is different for each individual
    5. 5. CLASSROOM IMPLICATIONS FOR THE TEACHERThe teacher must offer a variety of activities and ways for studentsto learn the materialAccording to Vygotsky teachers should “discover the level of eachchild’s cognitive/social development and build or construct theirlearning experiences from that pointTeachers should avoid a fact-driven curriculum and focus on largeideasIn regards to technology, teachers should offer many different typesof technology for children to utilize in an assignment For a research assignment students would use a computer, a powerpoint software etc.Teachers need to make classroom activities student-centered
    6. 6. CLASSROOM IMPLICATIONS FOR THE STUDENTStudents should have a desire to exploreconcepts and ideasThey must take initiative to discover new ways ofthinking and utilize their previous knowledge andexperiences to do soThey will use critical-thinking skills to createtheir own individual understanding of a conceptThey need to collaborate with other studentsand work in groups to share ideasThey will use technology to explore ideas andtopics and use softwares to share their ideas andperspectives
    7. 7. PERSONAL THOUGHTSAs a future math teacher, the main component ofconstructivism that I agree with is doing and practicing,students learn math best doing many practice problems.Using ideas of constructivism is a great way for studentsto learn material for the long term.I like students to collaborate and learn in a creative way.With math, constructivism does not fully apply becausethere is set definitions and not as much room forexplorations but students can still apply math to a varietyof situations and learn to think of everyday things in amathematical way.
    8. 8. CREDITShttp://www.learning-theories.com/constructivism.htmlhttp://mason.gmu.edu/~wwarrick/Portfolio/Products/constructivism.htmlTextbook pages 376-382

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