Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Business basis of design
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Business basis of design

349

Published on

Addressing Project Capital Efficiency through a Business Basis of Design …

Addressing Project Capital Efficiency through a Business Basis of Design

Large capital construction projects in both the industrial and infrastructure sectors are challenged today in three significant ways:
 Capital efficiency of the project – this considers both first costs as well as life cycle costs
 Capital certainty – reflecting execution efficiency, predictability and effective risk transfer through appropriate contracting strategies
 Time to market – perhaps best thought of as schedule certainty but also accelerated delivery of projects, often an essential ingredient in capital efficiency

This paper focuses on achieving improved capital efficiency in large capital asset projects through the adoption of an expanded basis of design that considers all aspects of a capital asset’s life cycle. In many projects today the basis of design (BOD) largely encompasses the engineering parameters which are required to meet the owner’s project requirements.

Constructability and maintainability are often treated as review items to confirm that the developed design is both constructible and maintainable and to suggest improvements at the margins. Effective constructability and maintainability reviews add value to the project but do not fundamentally act to shape the design itself in most instances.

The premise of this paper is that more, much more, is required to develop effective designs that are developed with construction and maintenance as fundamental project requirements. In this sense construction and maintenance considerations are not items to be reviewed but rather fundamental requirements to be satisfied together with other project requirements established by the owner. The change suggested is about a shift in mindset and perspective as well as in our design work processes.

Published in: Engineering, Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
349
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 1 of 21 Addressing Project Capital Efficiency through a Business Basis of Design By Bob Prieto Large capital construction projects in both the industrial and infrastructure sectors are challenged today in three significant ways:  Capital efficiency of the project – this considers both first costs as well as life cycle costs  Capital certainty – reflecting execution efficiency, predictability and effective risk transfer through appropriate contracting strategies  Time to market – perhaps best thought of as schedule certainty but also accelerated delivery of projects, often an essential ingredient in capital efficiency This paper focuses on achieving improved capital efficiency in large capital asset projects through the adoption of an expanded basis of design that considers all aspects of a capital asset’s life cycle. In many projects today the basis of design (BOD) largely encompasses the engineering parameters which are required to meet the owner’s project requirements. Constructability and maintainability are often treated as review items to confirm that the developed design is both constructible and maintainable and to suggest improvements at the margins. Effective constructability and maintainability reviews add value to the project but do not fundamentally act to shape the design itself in most instances. The premise of this paper is that more, much more, is required to develop effective designs that are developed with construction and maintenance as fundamental project requirements. In this sense construction and maintenance considerations are not items to be reviewed but rather fundamental requirements to be satisfied together with other project requirements established by the owner. The change suggested is about a shift in mindset and perspective as well as in our design work processes.
  • 2. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 2 of 21 1. Terminology & Definitions The following constitute the key terminology used throughout this paper and provide the context for a so-called “Business Basis of Design”. This term, an “expanded basis of design” and BODX are all used synonymously in this paper. Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR) – sometimes confusingly called “design intent” but referring to OPR BOD – Functional or performance based narrative description of what designer will do to meet OPR; finalized at end of construction; includes assumptions and criteria used CBOD – Construction Basis of Design – narrative description of construction requirements to be reflected in design (developed by construction manager) and finalized at end of construction; includes assumptions and constraints used including means & methods preferences (specific tools or equipment as an example) O&MBOD – O&M Basis of Design - narrative description of operations and maintenance (O&M) requirements to be reflected in design (developed by operator/O&M) and finalized at end of construction; includes maintenance philosophy, assumptions and criteria used. Provides a basis for development of the O&M program and manual. BODX – Expanded basis of design, collectively incorporating the traditional engineering basis of design (BOD), new construction basis of design (CBOD) and a new operating and maintenance basis of design (O&MBOD). BODX is driven by construction and O&M considerations while meeting the performance and functional requirements typically detailed in the OPR. 2. Focus of BODX The Business Basis of design or BODX is focused on improving the quality and cost effectiveness of the developed design throughout the full life cycle. Specifically it:  Ensures all project participants are aligned on strategic business objectives as reflected in OPR  Ensures owner, construction management and O&M are clear on wants and needs
  • 3. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 3 of 21  Ensures designer is focused on supporting an efficient construction execution strategy which reflects project construction considerations, opportunities and constraints  Informs the process for identification, evaluation and selection of design solutions to meet functional or performance specifications.  Provides expanded criteria to evaluate and validate design solutions and submissions  Provides clear acceptance criteria verified during construction, commissioning and initial operation  Informs decisions on equipment selection, layout, installation, operation, maintenance and replacement until requirements change  Delivers a more effective asset management database at startup  Improves construction efficiency and effectiveness  Enhances construction safety  Improves O&M efficiency and effectiveness  Supports 7DSM Optioneering – considering all life cycle costs The BODX encompasses the traditional “engineering” basis of design as well as an expanded basis of design encompassing construction, operations and maintenance considerations. The following sections will further develop the scope and content of both the construction basis of design (CBOD) and operations and maintenance basis of design (O&MBOD). Common to each of the three basis of design requirements are the following three elements:  Project Narrative  Rationale from the defined perspective  Validation and verification This last element is often not adequately addressed in developed basis of design documents but takes on increased importance as:  Inspection technologies allow us to “see” previously undetectable flaws  Construction means and methods around which a design may be developed are assessed for completeness of design inclusion and actual effectiveness  Performance based standards and contracting take on larger roles in facility development and operation. Let’s look at some of the elements that comprise these expanded elements of the basis of design.
  • 4. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 4 of 21 3. Elements of a Construction Basis of Design (CBOD) The CBOD seeks to further actualize CII Constructability Concepts I-1 and I-5.  CII Constructability Concept I-1 states “Constructability Program is an integral part of the Project Execution Plan.”  CII Constructability Concept I-5 states “Basic design approaches consider major construction methods.” Specific elements that an effective construction basis of design will consider include:  Comprehensive identification of required or preferred construction strategies, tactics, techniques and tools to be incorporated in the construction process that influence project management and design  Construction labor, skills, equipment, materials of construction, logistical constraints to be reflected in basis of design  Construction Basis of Design addresses unique requirements to be incorporated in design development that reflects owner or contractor preferences for achieving the owner’s project requirements (OPR).  These requirements may reflect:  Prior experience of the owner  Unique risks, opportunities or constraints associated with the project  Contractor capabilities and experience  Special tools uniquely available to the project  Broader programmatic objectives required of the owner or independently committed to by the owner that influences construction execution.  Applicable safety program to be used on project  CBOD considerations may be broadly grouped as basis of design requirements related to:  Labor  Equipment  Materials  Means & methods  Management processes and practices
  • 5. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 5 of 21  Labor  Sourcing  Labor relations (1) Work rules and requirements (2) Labor jurisdictional requirements to be addressed  Visa requirements, limitations, process durations  Multi-national labor force impact on site segregation and development  Safety  Hazard elimination (1) Hazard avoidance or reduction features to be facilitated by design (a) Eliminate hazards The unique lifting capabilities of the Left Coast Lifter fundamentally altered design and significantly reduced capital costs on the new Tappan Zee Bridge. Photo: Left Coast Lifter – SFOBB "Photograph © Joseph A. Blum"
  • 6. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 6 of 21 (b) Pinch points (c) Heavy lifts minimized or eliminated (i) Use of jack up construction (ii) Vertical modules (d) Work at height (i) minimized or eliminated by construction at grade (less than 6’) (ii) permanent structures incorporate platforms or provisions for temporary platforms  Hazard mitigation (1) Reduce the hazard (a) Equip any required scaffolding with railings and toe boards (2) Improved access to workface (a) Access requirements for construction identified considering sequence of construction (and maintenance) (b) Enhanced positional awareness through use of RFID  Knowledge  Labor (1) activity linked safety and skills training reflected in construction resourcing plan and master project schedule (2) activity linked equipment, materials and tools to facilitate staging and reduction in idle time (3) reskilling for later stage activities including maintenance phase activities Mining project stockpile utilized jack up construction to help reduce heavy lifts at the site
  • 7. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 7 of 21  Welfare  Onsite medical facilities and requirements  Camp requirements (facilities and services)  Productivity  Enhance labor productivity through design (1) Minimize the number of sku’s for components and materials to be manually installed (nuts & bolts; welds; fasteners) (2) Use controlled environments at environmentally challenged sites (a) Early usage of permanent facilities (warehouse, admin building) (b) Temporary facilities provided for in plot plan development (dynamic air shelters)  Equipment  Procurement  Labeling/tracking requirements (barcode/RFID)  Measurement units in installation (and maintenance) documents (English/metric)  Orientation of installation schematics to conform to installation position  Hazard mitigation (1) No sharp corners  Logistics  Incorporation of adequately sized and placed lifting points  Shipping and packaging to eliminate removal of temporary bracing  Single stream protection and packaging materials to facilitate recycling  Installation  Self alignment  Self leveling  Required laydown and movement envelopes including associated logistical equipment  Access corridors for installation  Pre-commissioning  Incorporation of pre-commissioning isolation valves and electrical lockouts required  Accessible temporary attachment points for test equipment  Materials  Preferred material sources and alternates and impact on design  Material tracking requirements to be reflected in design specifications
  • 8. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 8 of 21  Preferred logistical approach and impact on design  On-site use of batch plant – available quality of concrete  Concrete placement strategy – pumped vs. bucket  On-site bending of rebar – quality considerations to be reflected in design  On-site welding of pipe and structural steel assemblies – impact on design and construction sequence  Means & methods  Focus is on means and methods selection rationale for design impacting elements of construction  Strategies  Reduce indirects (1) Reduce general conditions cost by (a) shortening schedule elements with high GC costs (specialized labor or equipment) (b) reducing overall project schedule  Reduce need for enabling works (1) reduce overall project schedule  Modularization/fabrication with appropriate metrics such as manhours displaced embedded in each shipment received  Requirements for off-site construction  Tactics  Reduce temporary works (1) Minimize need for scaffolding by incorporating platforms or support for temporary, reusable platforms in structural design (2) Incorporate temporary steel for shipping of assemblies in final assembly design to eliminate removal of shipping steel  Reuse formwork and temporary works (1) Size foundations to re-use formwork  Minimize excavations  Techniques  Lift many once – high lifts with long duty cycle benefit from lifting many items at once to height and final placing with alternate equipment (1) Daisy chaining requires lift points that facilitate safe lift (2) Racking and packaging for lifts may eliminate lifting skids and pallets  Tools  Unique equipment to be employed (1) Heavy lift
  • 9. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 9 of 21 (a) Example – Left Coast Lifter (2) Welding (3) RFID  Management processes and practices  Owner’s policies, guidelines or other directives affecting construction  Regulatory limitations on construction practices, means & methods  Desired sequence of construction  Early works packages required  Permanent facilities to support construction  Trade sequencing or other labor driven sequencing  Restricted construction  Preliminary execution strategy and plan  Eliminate later stage trenching operations impacting site logistics  Incorporate commissioning sequence and temporary facilities and equipment  Establish “site needs” dates (including mod yard need dates)  RFI reduction by reflecting means & methods considerations in design model (BIM)  Sustainability  Construction energy, water, waste requirements (1) Energy (2) Waste (3) Water (4) Social (a) Knowledge transfer (b) Community development (c) Industry development (i) Areas targeted for local sourcing  Validation and verification  Quality control and assurance  Commissioning  Provisions to be reflected in design (1) Systems/subsystems/components should be designed to be functionally, mechanically, electrically and electronically as independent as practical to facilitate pre-commissioning testing. (2) Recognize that commissioning starts with the first drawings in the feasibility stage  Workface planning
  • 10. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 10 of 21 4. Elements of O&MBOD Operating and maintenance costs often represent over half of life cycle costs of a capital asset on a present worth basis as shown in the following figure for a typical steam assisted gravity drain (SAGD) oil sands project. Development of an effective O&M basis of design should as a minimum encompass:  Comprehensive identification of required or preferred construction strategies, tactics, techniques and tools to be incorporated in the operations and maintenance (O&M) process that influence design  O&M labor, skills, equipment, materials (including consumables), temporary provisions for maintenance to be reflected in basis of design  O&M Basis of Design addresses unique requirements to be incorporated in design development that reflects owner or contractor preferences for achieving the owner’s project requirements (OPR).  These requirements may reflect:  Prior experience of the owner
  • 11. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 11 of 21  Unique constraints associated with the project location; environmental setting; process operations; and labor availability, cost and skills level.  Contracting community capabilities and experience  Special tools required for major maintenance  Broader programmatic objectives required of the owner or independently committed to by the owner that influences maintenance execution.  Applicable safety program to be used during facility operation  O&MBOD considerations may be broadly grouped as basis of design requirements related to:  Labor  Equipment  Materials  O&M practices and techniques  Management processes and practices Pipe location makes replacement due to high abrasion rates difficult (shown in thermal image). Consideration in O&MBOD would have identified this added basis of design.
  • 12. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 12 of 21  Labor  Sourcing  Provisions required to address union work rules  Provisions required to meet workforce cultural or local practices requirements (1) Example – prayer rooms; special food preparation requirements; gender segregation  Safety  Hazard elimination (1) Identify changed safety conditions associated with maintenance activities and eliminate or mitigate new safety hazards (2) Access points and covers should not have sharp corners (3) Design should reflect safe access for maintenance and repair (4) Avoid hazardous access points (manholes in live traffic areas) (5) Reduce weight of components frequently moved (manhole cover; access plate; paving slabs; concrete curbs) The need for access to valves on tail pumps would be part of an O&MBOD
  • 13. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 13 of 21 (6) Provide for “isolation” of equipment to maintenance under continuous operations (a) Lockout valves and switches (b) Electrical isolation  Hazard mitigation (1) Reduce the hazard (a) Minimize work at height (b) Minimize hand operations during maintenance (c) Minimize potential pinch points (d) Minimize sharp corners (e) Minimize exposure time in extreme environments associated with periodic maintenance (f) Minimize need for lifts or temporary ladders for routine maintenance (2) Improved access to workface Heater controls are local to the heater only, with no access to the control panel which is 6 meters above the ground. An O&MBOD would identify accessibility requirements to reduce work at heights.
  • 14. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 14 of 21 (a) Required work platforms and equipment laydown or pull areas to be reflected in design (b) Space provisions for temporary equipment required for maintenance operations and accessibility envelope  Knowledge  Ensure full engineering, procurement, construction data pull through to asset management and O&M systems  Productivity  Facilitate grouping or simultaneous performance of maintenance operations  Equipment  Maintenance  Incorporate maintenance provisions in design development (1) Reflect maintenance set-up and staging requirements (2) Identify typical combinations of maintenance activities in plant and systems design and layout (3) Design for rapid replacement of routine maintenance items (plug and play; quick opening fasteners) (4) Systems/subsystems/components should be designed to be functionally, mechanically, electrically and electronically as independent as practical to facilitate maintenance and testing. (5) Maintenance “envelops” should be reflected in design layouts (6) Increase accessibility to areas of frequent maintenance (a) Provide flat laydown areas for components removed during maintenance or replacement (b) Identify provisions for maintenance (scaffolding, lifts etc) (c) Identify any maintenance crane or other temporary equipment support points and confirm capacity and clearances (7) Minimize joints and bearings  Incorporate temporary maintenance provisions in base design to avoid use of temporary hoses, power lines etc. (1) Power (2) Water (3) Compressed gases (4) Wastewater including spill collection (5) Attachment points (for lifting equipment for access removal or repair or replacement)
  • 15. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 15 of 21 (6) Attachment points for temporary crane rails or mobile equipment envelopes  Repair  Reduce spare parts requirements, costs and risks through design (1) Minimize spare part types (2) Identify long lead items for spares planning (3) Ensure long term availability for spares (4) Standardization of components to minimize maintenance spares and tool sets  Replacement  All machines fail and must be repaired or replaced. Provide for this activity. (1) Consider replacement strategies for major components over the project’s full lifetime  Materials  Minimize maintenance to the extent achievable  Improve deterioration and environmental resistance of exposed systems and structures (mildew; organic pollutants)
  • 16. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 16 of 21 (1) Moisture – eliminate ponding especially on exposed steel surfaces; ensure good drainage (2) Caustic materials including materials associated with cleaning and maintenance (3) UV light  Minimize need for painting  Minimize surface and material wear (1) Identify potential areas susceptible to corrosion abrasion  O&M practices and techniques  Unique O&M practices or techniques to be utilized and provided for in design  Management processes and practices  Build O&M documentation from initiation of design  FMEA and FTA analysis should be included in system and component maintenance documentation  Identify all maintenance assumptions and requirements in design documents and consolidate and track  O&M information, including equipment and vendor data, required to be directly incorporated in the facility asset model (building information model (BIM)) or database  Contractual provisions to support long term O&M  Special warranty or servicing requirements  Performance contracting requirements 5. Conclusion The rational and role for an expanded basis of design or a so called “Business Basis of Design” is initially established and new terminology to address the elements of an expanded and more robust basis of design laid out. Initial scopes of a construction basis of design and an operations and maintenance basis of design have been laid out with a framework to support further development. Finally, checklists to guide development of these expanded elements of the basis of design document have been provided in Tables 1 and 2.
  • 17. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 17 of 21 References 1. Application of Life Cycle Analysis in the Capital Assets Industry; Construction Management Association of America (CMAA); June 2013; ISBN 978-1-938014- 06-2 (eBook); ISBN 978-1-938014-07-9 (Print) 2. Life Cycle Analysis – a 7DSM Future; National Institute of Building Sciences; January 9, 2014 3. Application of Life Cycle Analysis in the Capital Assets Industry; PM World Today; March 2012 4. How Radically will Project Execution Change: A 7DSM Future; CMAA Future Focus; Washington DC; March 4 -5, 2012
  • 18. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 18 of 21 Table 1 BODX Checklist - CBOD General  Comprehensive identification of required or preferred construction strategies, tactics, techniques and tools  Construction labor, skills, equipment, materials of construction, logistical constraints to be reflected in basis of design  Unique requirements that reflects owner or contractor preferences such as:  Prior experience of the owner  Unique risks, opportunities or constraints associated with the project  Contractor capabilities and experience  Special tools uniquely available to the project  Broader programmatic objectives required of the owner or independently committed to by the owner that influences construction execution.  Applicable safety program to be used on project Specific CBOD considerations may be broadly grouped as basis of design requirements related to:  Labor  Equipment  Materials  Means & methods  Management processes and practices  Labor  Sourcing  Safety – hazard elimination and mitigation  Knowledge  Welfare  Productivity  Equipment  Procurement  Logistics  Installation  Materials
  • 19. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 19 of 21  Preferred material sources  Material tracking  Preferred logistical approach  On-site material activities  Means & methods  Focus on design impacting elements of construction  Strategies  Reduce indirects  Reduce need for enabling works  Modularization/fabrication with appropriate metrics  Requirements for off-site construction  Tactics  Reduce temporary works  Minimize excavations  Techniques  Tools - Unique equipment to be employed  Management processes and practices  Owner’s policies, guidelines or other directives affecting construction  Regulatory limitations on construction practices, means & methods  Desired sequence of construction  RFI reduction  Sustainability  Construction energy, water, waste requirements  Commissioning - Provisions to be reflected in design  Workface planning
  • 20. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 20 of 21 Table 2 BODX Checklist - O&MBOD General  Operations and maintenance (O&M) process that influence design  O&M labor, skills, equipment, materials (including consumables), temporary provisions for maintenance to be reflected in basis of design  Unique requirements such as:  Contracting community capabilities and experience  Special tools required for major maintenance  Broader programmatic objectives required of the owner or independently committed to by the owner that influences maintenance execution.  Applicable safety program to be used during facility operation Specific O&MBOD considerations may be broadly grouped as basis of design requirements related to:  Labor  Equipment  Materials  O&M practices and techniques  Management processes and practices  Labor  Sourcing  Safety  Knowledge  Productivity  Equipment  Maintenance – provisions; combinations; accessibility, minimization  Repair – minimization of spare types  Replacement  Materials – minimize maintenance  O&M practices and techniques that are unique  Management processes and practices  Documentation  Asset management  Contractual provisions to support long term O&M
  • 21. PM World Journal Addressing Project Capital Efficiency Vol. III, Issue IV – April 2014 through a Business Basis of Design www.pmworldjournal.net Featured Paper by Bob Prieto © 2014 Bob Prieto www.pmworldlibrary.net Page 21 of 21 About the Author Bob Prieto Senior Vice President Fluor Princeton, NJ, USA Bob Prieto is a senior vice president of Fluor, one of the largest, publicly traded engineering and construction companies in the world. He is responsible for strategy for the firm’s Industrial & Infrastructure group which focuses on the development and delivery of large, complex projects worldwide. The group encompasses three major business lines including Infrastructure, with an emphasis on Public Private Partnerships; Mining; and Industrial Services. Bob consults with owners of large engineering & construction capital construction programs across all market sectors in the development of programmatic delivery strategies encompassing planning, engineering, procurement, construction and financing. He is author of “Strategic Program Management”, “The Giga Factor: Program Management in the Engineering and Construction Industry” and “Application of Life Cycle Analysis in the Capital Assets Industry” published by the Construction Management Association of America (CMAA) and “Topics in Strategic Program Management” as well as over 450 other papers and presentations. Bob is a member of the ASCE Industry Leaders Council, National Academy of Construction and a Fellow of the Construction Management Association of America. Bob served until 2006 as one of three U.S. presidential appointees to the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Business Advisory Council (ABAC), working with U.S. and Asia-Pacific business leaders to shape the framework for trade and economic growth and had previously served as both as Chairman of the Engineering and Construction Governors of the World Economic Forum and co-chair of the infrastructure task force formed after September 11th by the New York City Chamber of Commerce. Previously, he served as Chairman at Parsons Brinckerhoff (PB), one of the world’s leading engineering companies. Bob Prieto can be contacted at Bob.Prieto@fluor.com.

×