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Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
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Rising Tide

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This is a presentation made by me to the Emami Brand Team on the book "Rising Tide - Lessons from 165 years of Brand Building at Procter & Gamble"

This is a presentation made by me to the Emami Brand Team on the book "Rising Tide - Lessons from 165 years of Brand Building at Procter & Gamble"

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  • 1.
  • 2. rising tideLessons from 165 yrs of Brand Building at P&G<br />
  • 3. Brief History<br />Getting Started<br />Ivory Soap <br />Story of Tide: Detergent Wars<br />Learning to Compete in Japan<br />Success in Shampoos (80s)<br />Diaper Wars<br />Success in Mexico<br />The Russian Experience<br />Restructuring P&G<br />Million Dollar Brands<br />
  • 4. Brief History<br />William Procter, an English storekeeper & candle maker and James Gamble, a Irish soap maker settled in Cincinnati, set up their business and married sisters Olivia and Elizabeth Ann Norris<br />Father-in-law Alexander Norris (also a candle maker) suggested that they join hands to survive the banking crisis of 1837<br />P&G was born with the commodity business of soaps and candles<br />Cincinnati – the largest meat packing center in the US was a hub for Soap and Candle makers who depending on the byproducts<br />
  • 5. Humble Beginnings<br />The development of Rail Roads helped P&G transport their commodities to markets beyond Cincinnati<br />Manufacturing Unit was set up in Central Avenue, Downtown CCN<br />Through most of the 19th century, P&G continued to sell unbranded soaps and candles<br />The first movement from commodities to consumer goods came with the launch of Ivory (1870s) and now the company has evolved into a Global Giant with over 33 million dollar brands<br />
  • 6. Brief History<br />Getting Started<br />Ivory Soap <br />Story of Tide: Detergent Wars<br />Learning to Compete in Japan<br />Success in Shampoos (80s)<br />Diaper Wars<br />Success in Mexico<br />The Russian Experience<br />Restructuring P&G<br />Million Dollar Brands<br />
  • 7. Getting Started: Rising Tide<br />This book chronicles the evolution of P&G from local candle maker to global multinational<br />Second purpose of the book is to explain the company’s success in its core business of building consumer brands<br />Research for the book done through a series of interviews conducted with a host of senior and middle managers<br />
  • 8. Some shortcomings<br />Despite having documented data, the authors have relied on interviews with P&G managers<br />….managers employed with P&G, while being interviewed<br />Therefore success is attributed to hard work and resourcefulness of enterprising employees<br />And failures are put down to reasons beyond management control or shown as “lessons” which enabled the company to become stronger<br />
  • 9. Why read this book?<br />Story of how P&G succeeded in building strong brands<br />1879<br />1946<br />1961<br />1955<br />1990<br />
  • 10. Why read this book?<br />Succeeded against the worthy competitors<br />
  • 11. Why read this book?<br />And built an organization, admired by many<br />
  • 12. Brief History<br />Getting Started<br />Ivory Soap <br />Story of Tide: Detergent Wars<br />Learning to Compete in Japan<br />Success in Shampoos (80s)<br />Diaper Wars<br />Success in Mexico<br />The Russian Experience<br />Restructuring P&G<br />Million Dollar Brands<br />
  • 13. History of Ivory Soap <br />In 1879, a soap maker at P&G forgot to turn off the soap mixer, during lunch.<br />More than the usual amount of air was shipped into the batch of “The White Soap”<br />To cover up his mistake, the soap maker packaged & shipped the air-filled soap to customers around the country. <br />Soon customers were asking for more "soap that floats." When company officials found out what happened, they turned it into one of the company’s most successful products - Ivory Soap.<br />
  • 14. Excellent Laundry Soap, of great purity and more than average cleansing power<br />“It Floats” / Purity 99 44/100 %<br />“Suitable for all kinds of washing needs: face and hands, clothing and delicate articles….”<br />Earliest Advertising in all Leading Magazines of US<br />“If your grocer does not keep the Ivory Soap and declines to get it for you, the manufacturer (P&G, Cincinnati) will furnish it direct”<br />
  • 15. Crisis in Production<br />In 1884, a fire broke out in the downtown factory consuming a sizable portion of the soap operations<br />This disaster gave P&G an opportunity to overhaul their soap production setup. <br />The opportunities in the market were immense and the competition high. “IvoryDale” Unit built in the outskirts of Cincinnati helped Ivory move into the next level of readiness in terms of product availability<br />Ivory defined and taught P&G to get over initial setbacks and prepare for bigger businesses<br />
  • 16. Brief History<br />Getting Started<br />Ivory Soap <br />Story of Tide: Detergent Wars<br />Learning to Compete in Japan<br />Success in Shampoos (80s)<br />Diaper Wars<br />Success in Mexico<br />The Russian Experience<br />Restructuring P&G<br />Million Dollar Brands<br />
  • 17. Detergent Wars: The early days<br />In the 1920s, Americans used soap flakes to clean their laundry. The flakes performed poorly in hard water, leaving a ring in the washing machine, dulling colors, and turning whites gray. <br />P&G began an ambitious mission to change the way Americans washed their clothes. Researchers discovered two-part molecules which they called synthetic surfactants. <br />Each part of the "miracle molecules" executed a specific function--one pulled grease and dirt from the clothes, while the other suspended dirt until it could be rinsed away. <br />In 1933, this discovery was introduced in a detergent called "Dreft," but it could only handle lightly soiled jobs. The next goal was to create a detergent that could clean heavily soiled clothes. That detergent was Tide®.<br />
  • 18.
  • 19. Detergent Wars: The Tide Revolution<br />Created in 1943, Tide detergent was the combination of synthetic surfactants and "builders." The builders helped the synthetic surfactants penetrate the clothes more deeply to attack greasy, difficult stains. <br />Introduced to test markets in October 1946 as the world’s first heavy-duty detergent, consumer response to Tide was immediate and intense. <br />Tide detergent outsold every other brand within weeks. It became so popular that store owners were forced to limit the quantity purchased per customer.<br />Tide detergent was improved 22 times during its first 21 years on the market, and P&G still strives for perfection. Each year, researchers duplicate the mineral content of water from all parts of the United States and wash 50,000 loads of laundry to test Tide detergent’s consistency and performance<br />
  • 20. Brief History<br />Getting Started<br />Ivory Soap <br />Story of Tide: Detergent Wars<br />Learning to Compete in Japan<br />Success in Shampoos (80s)<br />Diaper Wars<br />Success in Mexico<br />The Russian Experience<br />Restructuring P&G<br />Million Dollar Brands<br />
  • 21. Learning to compete in Japan<br />“If you cant compete with them in Japan, you cant compete with them anywhere”<br />P&G entered Japanese market by acquiring Nippon Sunhome Ltd in 1973 – and in three years their laundry powder “Cheer” become a best seller<br />Understanding Japanese Culture: Mistakes in Advertising <br />Understanding Local Customs and Culture – instead of adapting American way of working helped P&G gain a foothold in the Japan market.<br />
  • 22. “The Great Flying Leap”<br />5 Key Points for Growth in Japan<br />Understand Japanese Consumers<br />Tailor Products To Japan<br />Market With Sensitivity To Culture<br />Sell The Company’s Image<br />Penetrate The Japanese Distribution System<br />
  • 23. Innovation in Japan<br />On Kao / Lion: By attacking them on their home turf P&G weakened its rivals, delayed their international expansion and P&G gained deep insight into the local marketplace<br />Febreze odor removing fabric spray is P&G’s crowning glory in innovative marketing<br />
  • 24. Brief History<br />Getting Started<br />Ivory Soap <br />Story of Tide: Detergent Wars<br />Learning to Compete in Japan<br />Success in Shampoos (80s)<br />Diaper Wars<br />Success in Mexico<br />The Russian Experience<br />Restructuring P&G<br />Million Dollar Brands<br />
  • 25. Success in Shampoos (80s)<br />Market Scenario<br />Pantene: Acquired by Richardson Vicks Inc in 1985<br />Other Brands - Head & Shoulders : had a 25% MS in the early 60s<br />Prell: Had a 22% MS in the 70s<br />By the 80s – Hair styles had changed/ aggressive new competition / P&G responding sluggishly<br />Most products in hair care were “very similar, without much differentiation”<br />Manufacturing of shampoos inexpensive – low entry barriers compared to the other categories of P&G<br />
  • 26. Evolution of P&G Shampoos<br />Pert – BC18 – Pert Plus – Pantene Pro V<br />Pert, launched in 1979 to turn the tide. Campaign line “Coast for your hair” The brand was positioned on refreshment and a green hi-scent formulation. <br />With competitors adding and communicating the component of conditioner more aggressively; Pert quickly changed its brand promise to “Wash & Go”<br />Since conditioner was seen as a very important aspect; Pert failed to evoke a strong response amongst consumers<br />Though P&G had a proven track record with technological breakthroughs (synthetic cleaning – Drene 1930s & dandruff control – Head & Shoulders 1960s), it seemed to have lost its technological edginess<br />
  • 27. Technology Breakthrough<br /> Testing (Beauty Care Product 18) BC18 : HPT , Focus Response<br /> Success of Pert Plus – First Shampoo + Conditioner<br /> Entry into Taiwan Market – Pantene Pro V<br /> Pantene Pro V : “Don’t‘ hate me because I’m beautiful” / Selling on the aura of beauty instead of functional performance<br /> Going Global<br />
  • 28. Brief History<br />Getting Started<br />Ivory Soap <br />Story of Tide: Detergent Wars<br />Learning to Compete in Japan<br />Success in Shampoos (80s)<br />Diaper Wars<br />Success in Mexico<br />The Russian Experience<br />Restructuring P&G<br />Million Dollar Brands<br />
  • 29. Diaper Wars<br />Primary Competitor - Huggies (Kimberly Clark)<br />Introduction of Luvs – a premium diaper brand<br />Learning from detergent category on multiple brand in a single category<br /> (Tide = premium , Cheer = safe on colors, Gain = fresh scent , Oxydol = bleach)<br />P&G worked on a strategy that Pampers stands for VFM and Luvs – a more premium offering <br />
  • 30.
  • 31.
  • 32. Brief History<br />Getting Started<br />Ivory Soap <br />Story of Tide: Detergent Wars<br />Learning to Compete in Japan<br />Success in Shampoos (80s)<br />Diaper Wars<br />Success in Mexico<br />The Russian Experience<br />Restructuring P&G<br />Million Dollar Brands<br />
  • 33. Success in Mexico<br />Strong competition from Colgate – Entrenched Player<br />Advertising Council Issues – Get the Language Right<br />Turning Point – Rapido Detergent / Perfect for local water conditions <br />Followed by the success of Ariel<br />Mexico seen as a entry point / Hub to Latin America<br />
  • 34. Ariel become P&G’s first Blockbuster Brand in Mexico<br />Based on Enzyme Formulations originally developed in Europe<br />
  • 35. Brief History<br />Getting Started<br />Ivory Soap <br />Story of Tide: Detergent Wars<br />Learning to Compete in Japan<br />Success in Shampoos (80s)<br />Diaper Wars<br />Success in Mexico<br />The Russian Experience<br />Restructuring P&G<br />Million Dollar Brands<br />
  • 36. Russia Market<br />Tracking the breakdown of communist Russia <br />Division of markets & setting objectives<br />Test Launches based on set objectives<br />Values of Company communicated<br />
  • 37. Crash of the Russian Market<br />Agree on Realistic Volume Forecasts<br />Restructure Internal Process and Workloads<br />Re-evaluation Of Supply Chain / Economize & Simplify Operations<br />Severance Package To Reduce Workload<br />Localize Management and Production<br />
  • 38. Brief History<br />Getting Started<br />Ivory Soap <br />Story of Tide: Detergent Wars<br />Learning to Compete in Japan<br />Success in Shampoos (80s)<br />Diaper Wars<br />Success in Mexico<br />Business with WallMart<br />The Russian Experience<br />Restructuring P&G<br />Million Dollar Brands<br />
  • 39. Restructuring P&G<br />Strategic Acquisitions<br />Pruning Low Potential SBUs / Exit Options<br />Supply Chain Reconfiguration – Understanding Issues<br />Deal with Wall Mart<br />Understanding & Implementing Value Pricing <br />Lafleys 10 beliefs<br />Values of P&G<br />
  • 40. Strategic Acquisitions<br />By 2K – P&G has a fast growing brands in beauty & health care (including oral care) and had traditional strong brands in fabric care, home care and paper products (including feminine protection)<br />Major Acquisitions of the period : Max Factor (1991), Tambrands (1997), Iams (1999), Clariol (2001) and Wella (2003)<br />
  • 41. Pruning Low Potential SBUs<br />P&G departed from Crisco, Spic and Span, Biz, Duncan Hines and Jif<br />Hard Look at Food & Beverage Business / No Power Brands apart from Folgers and Pringles<br />Concerns on Citrus Hill Orange Juice (planned entry into Juices) and Fisher Nuts (planned entry to complement Pringles in the salty snack category)<br />Sept ‘92 – P&G liquidated Citrus Hill (along with selling off other minor Juice Brands) & in ‘95 after accumulating modest losses sold Nuts business to John B San Filippo<br />
  • 42. Supply Chain Reconfiguration<br />The era of passing out costs increases to consumers was over, so what were the avenues of cost control?<br />If orders were primarily coming through Electronic Orders, what was the role of the modern salesman?<br />Customers were getting more sophisticated in their use of IT and inventory management<br />Purchasing decisions in customer organizations were shifting from traditional criteria such as price and allowances to a more holistic set of criteria <br />
  • 43. Value Pricing<br />Look at the Market Value of the Company and subtract what the Balance Sheet says – the difference is the future earning power at NPV<br />If Brands are your source of Value Creation – then you have to ask “What are we doing to create strong brands” The stronger you make the more value you add to the company”<br />Strong Brand Franchises are created by creating strong consumer loyalty. “As a consumer if I came to a store and saw Tide at half the price I pad the week before, I’d be angry”<br />
  • 44. Bold Move and Subsequent Repercussion<br />Between 1989 – 90, P&G shifted virtually all its offerings to value pricing – attracting strong reactions<br />SUPERVALU added a Surcharge to P&G products / Certified Growers Midwest, a big distributor removed 40 P&G products off the list / Von’s a leading grocery chain in New England removed 13 products off the shelf / <br />“P&G is acting like a dictator, and like all dictators, they will fail. We will do everything in our power to undermine their plan” – Stop & Shop, leading grocery chain<br />
  • 45. Deal with Wal-Mart<br />In 2002, it took 117 prime time ads to reach 80% of 18-49 yr<br />By Comparison, 50% of the US Households shopped at Wal-Mart every week / 80% shopped at WM every month<br />Walton & Pritchett’s Canoe trip<br />Deal on Knowledge Transfer, Total System Efficiency, Total Quality<br />Sharing of experiences in Electronic Ordering, Custom Built Displays and New Sources of Cost Control<br />
  • 46. 10 things I believe – A.G. Lafley<br />Lead change: Change is inevitable<br />The consumer is boss<br />    Innovation is our lifeblood<br />Power of strategy: Where to play and how to win<br />Power of execution: Win in the store<br />Power of brands<br />Power of knowledge and learning<br />Power of P&G people: Without us, no strategies, no brands, no execution<br />    Direct, simple and transparent: What you see is what you get<br /> Take purpose, values and principles seriously<br />
  • 47.
  • 48. Brief History<br />Getting Started<br />Ivory Soap <br />Story of Tide: Detergent Wars<br />Learning to Compete in Japan<br />Success in Shampoos (80s)<br />Diaper Wars<br />Success in Mexico<br />Business with WallMart<br />The Russian Experience<br />Million Dollar Brands<br />
  • 49.
  • 50. mail: pradeep@emamigroup.com<br />twitter: rpki<br />LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/pradeep26<br />

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