<ul><ul><li>PRE-PRODUCTION </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Script Development </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>B...
<ul><li>WRITE A ONE-PAGE STORY DESCRIBING THE PROPOSED PROJECT </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Describe what you intend to do an...
<ul><li>CREATE A SHOOTING SCRIPT FOR THE FILM PROJECT </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Movies tell stories with visual images and...
SCR  I  P T  FORMA T T I NG   GU I DE <ul><li>Title Page:   Title & screenwriter(s) names in the middle.  </li></ul><ul><l...
SCRIPT  EXAMPLE
<ul><li>SPIES  </li></ul><ul><li>by  </li></ul><ul><li>Roseanne Perez </li></ul>
<ul><li>1.   </li></ul><ul><li>” SPIES&quot;   </li></ul><ul><li>FADE IN:   </li></ul><ul><li>2 SPACES </li></ul><ul><li>E...
<ul><li>2.   </li></ul><ul><li>INT. POLICE STATION/OFFICE – DAY   </li></ul><ul><li>SARGEANT PAUL GARCIA (55) slams down h...
<ul><li>3.   </li></ul><ul><li>INTERCUT - INT. POLICE STATION/HOME – DAY   </li></ul><ul><li>GARCIA </li></ul><ul><li>(int...
<ul><li>CREATE A SET OF STORYBOARDS THAT  </li></ul><ul><li>ACCURATELY VISUALLY DESCRIBE THE FILM  </li></ul><ul><li>PROJE...
STORYBOARD EXAMPLE Nationwide Comcast Commercial
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
<ul><li>1.  ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES FOR THE SHOOT </li></ul><ul><ul><li>As a team, decide what roles each of you will pla...
<ul><li>Editing is to filmmaking as rewriting is to writing. </li></ul><ul><li>Storyboards are the outline. </li></ul><ul>...
<ul><li>1.  EXHIBIT - VIEW VIDEO ON SCHOOLTUBE </li></ul><ul><li>2.  REVIEW - WRITE REVIEW ON CLASSROOM  BLOG (EDMODO). </...
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3step filmmaking process

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These are the 3 steps in the film making process.

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  • REVIEW PAGE 70 AFI SCREEN SET LIGHTING
  • STORYBOARDING - SHOTS &amp; DEFINITIONS AFI PAGES 44&amp; 45 &amp; 49 ….50-61
  • Definitions AFI Pages 46-48 Call Sheet Page 84
  • Definitions AFI Pages 46-48 Call Sheet Page 84
  • 3step filmmaking process

    1. 1. <ul><ul><li>PRE-PRODUCTION </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Script Development </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Brainstorm </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Decide upon project </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Identify the “Who, What, Where, When and Why” </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Screenwriting & Storyboarding </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PRODUCTION </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Production & Filming </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>POST-PRODUCTION </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Editing </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Exhibit, Review & Reflect </li></ul></ul></ul>FILMMAKING 3-Step Process
    2. 2. <ul><li>WRITE A ONE-PAGE STORY DESCRIBING THE PROPOSED PROJECT </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Describe what you intend to do and why </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Set-up, tension development (conflict/crisis) and resolution </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Used to sell a project (to the teacher) before the script is written </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What characters are in the scene? What do they say? How do they communicate? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Does the scene make sense? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>SET LENGTH FOR FINAL PROJECT (30SEC - 5MIN) </li></ul><ul><li>PRESENT OR “PITCH” THE STORY IDEA TO THE TEACHER FOR COMMENT AND APPROVAL </li></ul>STEP 1 SCRIPT DEVELOPMENT
    3. 3. <ul><li>CREATE A SHOOTING SCRIPT FOR THE FILM PROJECT </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Movies tell stories with visual images and sound. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The screenplay provides a detailed roadmap for the director and other members of the filmmaking team </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The screenplay includes: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>All the words spoken by the characters </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Stage directions that indicate all nonverbal actions by characters </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Elements of setting </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sound effects </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Design & music </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>All in all --- A screenwriter writes everything intended for an audience to see and hear. </li></ul></ul></ul>STEP 1 SCREENWRITING
    4. 4. SCR I P T FORMA T T I NG GU I DE <ul><li>Title Page: Title & screenwriter(s) names in the middle. </li></ul><ul><li>Font: Always use 12-point Courier ; no bold face or italics. </li></ul><ul><li>Page Numbering: Place the page number on every page in the upper right corner, except the cover. </li></ul><ul><li>Spacing: Double space between slug line, action line, speaking character, stage directions and dialogue. Single space action lines and lines of dialogue. </li></ul><ul><li>The Slug Line: The general or specific location and time of day. Always in ALL CAPS. </li></ul><ul><li>Action Line: Sets the scene with a description of characters, places and action single spaced from margin to margin. </li></ul><ul><li>Voice Over: Indicated by placing (VO) immediately to the right of the character name. </li></ul><ul><li>Off Camera: Indicates that a character is speaking off screen, place (OC) Immediately to the right of the character name. </li></ul><ul><li>Stage directions : Written in parenthesis and under the name of the character speaking. Include what the character is doing within the scene. </li></ul><ul><li>Sound/Music Effects: Are always capitalized. </li></ul>
    5. 5. SCRIPT EXAMPLE
    6. 6. <ul><li>SPIES </li></ul><ul><li>by </li></ul><ul><li>Roseanne Perez </li></ul>
    7. 7. <ul><li>1. </li></ul><ul><li>” SPIES&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>FADE IN: </li></ul><ul><li>2 SPACES </li></ul><ul><li>EXT. CITY STREET – DAY </li></ul><ul><li>2 SPACES </li></ul><ul><li>Heat rises from the pavement. A red car </li></ul><ul><li>2 SPACES </li></ul><ul><li>Pedestrians leap out of the way of the wayward </li></ul><ul><li>As the car approaches, we see the driver is </li></ul><ul><li>3 SPACES </li></ul><ul><li>INT. CITY STREET – NIGHT </li></ul><ul><li>MACK </li></ul><ul><li>(with a smirk) </li></ul><ul><li>Try to catch me now, </li></ul><ul><li>coppers! </li></ul><ul><li>He tosses a stack of LOOSE BILLS out of the </li></ul><ul><li>Chaos ensues as PEOPLE rush into the street to </li></ul><ul><li>(MORE) </li></ul><ul><li>SCENE HEADINGS </li></ul><ul><li>AKA </li></ul><ul><li>SLUG LINE </li></ul><ul><li>(ALWAYS CAPS) </li></ul><ul><li>Must Include: </li></ul><ul><li>INT OR EXT </li></ul><ul><li>LOCATION </li></ul><ul><li>DAY OR NIGHT </li></ul><ul><li>TRANSITION </li></ul><ul><li>Method of changing from </li></ul><ul><li>one scene to another </li></ul><ul><li>RULE OF THUMB </li></ul><ul><li>Every scene will CUT TO: the next if no transition is specified </li></ul><ul><li>If necessary to specify one, it appears against the right margin like this. </li></ul><ul><li>DISSOLVE TO: </li></ul><ul><li>SCENE ACTION </li></ul><ul><li>ALWAYS PRESENT TENSE </li></ul><ul><li>MIX UPPER AND LOWER CASE TEXT </li></ul><ul><li>RULE OF THUMB </li></ul><ul><li>LIMIT A PARAGRAPH OF SCENE ACTION TO 4-5 LINES </li></ul><ul><li>EACH PARAGRAPH IS A BEAT OF ACTION WITHIN YOUR SCENE </li></ul><ul><li>Scene action should only deal with what is happening on the screen and must never stray into thoughts or back-story. </li></ul><ul><li>NOTE </li></ul><ul><li>Description of character must follow his introduction </li></ul><ul><li>CHARACTER </li></ul><ul><li>INDENTED AROUND THE MIDDLE BUT NOT CENTERED 2.2INCHES </li></ul><ul><li>NAMES SHOULD BE CONSISTENT THROUGHOUT THE SCRIPT </li></ul>1 inch 2 inches <ul><li>PARENTHETICAL </li></ul><ul><li>SPECIAL EMPHASIS </li></ul><ul><li>EXAMPLE </li></ul><ul><li>(to GRANDMA) </li></ul><ul><li>WORDS THAT DESCRIBE </li></ul><ul><li>MUST BE IN CAPS </li></ul>swerves through traffic. sedan. MACK ATTACK (20s), an unwashed cowboy whose eyes twinkle from lack of sleep. grab the money. window.
    8. 8. <ul><li>2. </li></ul><ul><li>INT. POLICE STATION/OFFICE – DAY </li></ul><ul><li>SARGEANT PAUL GARCIA (55) slams down his </li></ul><ul><li>GARCIA </li></ul><ul><li>(to his SIDEKICK) </li></ul><ul><li>Mack is back. </li></ul><ul><li> DISSOLVE TO: </li></ul><ul><li>EXT. POLICE STATION – NIGHT </li></ul><ul><li>MACK (O.S.) </li></ul><ul><li>I have something to tell you </li></ul><ul><li>too, Scott. </li></ul><ul><li>I was born an alien. </li></ul><ul><li>Looking straight into her eyes. Pam (45), tall </li></ul><ul><li> OPERATOR (V.O.) </li></ul><ul><li>Station one, we have a reported </li></ul><ul><li>murder on Boardwalk and Lee Street. </li></ul><ul><li>(MORE) </li></ul>SLUG LINE W/SUBLOCATION SCENE ACTION <ul><li>NOTE </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes it may be necessary to hear characters when we cant actually see them </li></ul><ul><li>O.S. </li></ul><ul><li>OFF SCREEN MEANS THE CHARACTER IS PHYSICALLY PRESENT WITHIN THE SCENE, BUT CAN ONLY BE HEARD </li></ul><ul><li>(they are speaking from another room) </li></ul>PARENTHETICAL phone. <ul><li>V.O. </li></ul><ul><li>VOICEOVER IS USED WHEN THE CHARACTER IS NOT PRESENT WITHIN THE SCENE, BUT CAN BE HEARD VIA A MECHANICAL DEVICE SUCH AS A PHONE/RADIO. </li></ul><ul><li>ALSO USED WHEN CHARACTER NARRATES THE STORY. </li></ul>blonde secretary, started CRYING.
    9. 9. <ul><li>3. </li></ul><ul><li>INTERCUT - INT. POLICE STATION/HOME – DAY </li></ul><ul><li>GARCIA </li></ul><ul><li>(into phone) </li></ul><ul><li>What happened? </li></ul><ul><li>MACK </li></ul><ul><li>(into phone) </li></ul><ul><li>I cant believe </li></ul><ul><li>this crime scene. </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><li> FADE TO: </li></ul><ul><li>EXT./INT. POLICE STATION – DAY </li></ul><ul><li>PROFESSOR </li></ul><ul><li>(EXCITEDLY) Let me guess! </li></ul><ul><li>Revolutionaries? (LEANING IN CLOSER) Intent on </li></ul><ul><li>stealing my life’s work? </li></ul><ul><li> FADE OUT. </li></ul><ul><li>THE END </li></ul>SLUG LINE Scene Heading will look like this when its necessary to CUT back and forth between locations in the same scene <ul><li>NOTE </li></ul><ul><li>IF YOU HAVE A SCENE WHERE THE ACTION IS CONTINUOSLY MOVING BETWEEN THE INT AND EXT OF THE SAME LOCATION, DO YOUR SCENE HEADING LIKE THIS </li></ul><ul><li>BUT USE INTERCUT FOR CUTTING BACK AND FORTH BETWEEN TWO SEPARATE PIECES OF ACTION INSIDE AND OUTSIDE. </li></ul><ul><li>NOTE </li></ul><ul><li>SIGN-OFF A FILM SCRIPT WITH </li></ul><ul><li>THE END CENTERED ON THE PAGE, </li></ul><ul><li>PRECEDED BY </li></ul><ul><li>FADE OUT </li></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>CREATE A SET OF STORYBOARDS THAT </li></ul><ul><li>ACCURATELY VISUALLY DESCRIBE THE FILM </li></ul><ul><li>PROJECT </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A visual script created by a series of pictures that conveys the essential shots of a scene. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>With simple artwork, even stick fi gures, the storyboard artist quickly and simply communicates to the entire team the visual components— broken down into individual shots—of the script. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The director should be able to determine the position of actors and the direction of their movements, and the type and framing of the shot (close-up, long shot, etc.). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Things to think about: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>• Does your storyboard show the important shots that you want in your fi lm? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>• Does it show how the fi lm sequence will be paced? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>• Does the storyboard show the action that is happening? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>• Could someone else outside of your group clearly understand what it is communicating? </li></ul></ul>STEP 1 STORYBOARDING
    11. 11. STORYBOARD EXAMPLE Nationwide Comcast Commercial
    12. 20. <ul><li>1. ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES FOR THE SHOOT </li></ul><ul><ul><li>As a team, decide what roles each of you will play to produce the scene that you have scripted and storyboarded. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Things to think about: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who will manage the production from start to finish? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who will direct? Who will shoot the film? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How will you create believable characters? Locations? Situations? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2. SHOOTING FROM THE STORYBOARDS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Based on the storyboards you created, film the shots required to completely tell the story described in your script and storyboards. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Things to Think About: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What is your job and what are your responsibilities for the shoot? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are you recording sound you don’t want? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How will you light the scene to achieve your dramatic intent? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How will you create mood? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do you have all the props and costumes you need on the day(s) you are shooting? </li></ul></ul>STEP 2 PRODUCTION & FILMING
    13. 21. <ul><li>Editing is to filmmaking as rewriting is to writing. </li></ul><ul><li>Storyboards are the outline. </li></ul><ul><li>Shooting is the first draft. And, like most first drafts, cut out the bad sentence structure/misspellings, and subtract and reconstruct to tell the story better! </li></ul><ul><li>The editor takes the jumbled pieces of film that come out of production, and, in consultation with the director and producer, transforms them into a coherent and well-paced story. </li></ul><ul><li>During the post-production step of the process, teams will perform the following tasks: </li></ul><ul><li>• Import video elements shot during the production step of the process. </li></ul><ul><li>• Use music, transitions and other effects to produce a finished final edit of the project. </li></ul>STEP 3 POST-PRODUCTION EDITING
    14. 22. <ul><li>1. EXHIBIT - VIEW VIDEO ON SCHOOLTUBE </li></ul><ul><li>2. REVIEW - WRITE REVIEW ON CLASSROOM BLOG (EDMODO). </li></ul><ul><li>Remember: Convince the reader that you have something interesting to say about the film - the plot is trivial, the hero is not really a hero, the plot and characters are fine but the camera work is needlessly tricky, or whatever else you decide your main point be. Any opinion must be supported by examples. </li></ul><ul><li>Things to Think About: </li></ul><ul><li>Here are some basic, starting questions to ask yourself when writing your review: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is the story original, how fresh or innovative is it? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are the characters believable? What is the theme of the film? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is the setting appropriate and effective? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Does the film make certain use of color, lighting, etc., to enhance the theme, mood and setting? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is the sound track effective? Are camera angles used effectively? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are there special effects in the film? If so, are they essential to the plot? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3. REFLECT After reading the individual reviews’, group members will reflect and reply to the classroom blog. </li></ul></ul>STEP 3 EXHIBIT/ REVIEW/ REFLECT

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