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1st Advocacy Session August 2012
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1st Advocacy Session August 2012

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  • .
  • EXPECTED !!!! REGARDLESS OF WHETHER IT … OUGHT VS. IS ROLE OF STUDENT behaviour: attend class responsibilities: hand in assignments on time expectations: study for tests, be responsible for own learning privileges: access to library, student services, etc.
  • Have students list positive and negative social roles. Ex. Student, homeowner, member, parent vs. eternal child, menace, burden of charity, object of pity. OH: Major Common Socio-historical role perceptions of individuals or groups who are different, devalued, minority or handicapped.
  • REMINDER: OUGHT VS. IS
  • Have students list qualities and conditions that they see as being devalued. WRITE THEM ON THE BOARD. Do students think that having a learning disability is seen as a difference that is perceived as significant by a ruling or majority segment of society who value this difference negatively? If not, ask them if they have ever been made to feel bad about having a disability – maybe felt like people thought they are stupid or felt that they themselves were stupid. OH: Minority Groups Widely Devalued In Western Society
  • Minimize devaluation: Not perceive the difference Perceive the difference in fewer areas Perceive the difference as insignificant by a significant majority of the people. View the difference positively. ALL OF THIS WITHOUT PUSHING OTHER PEOPLE DOWN
  • OH: Rielle as baby graduate. What is communicated about the role this child is filling or is EXPECTED to fill in the future?
  • – with typical students typical prof ’s, TA’s, other students, etc. Like typical students but paying even closer attention to behaviour. For a university student, this provides a broad range of choice. This does not restrict individuality but provides guidelines for appropriate behaviour.
  • 4. OH: Examples of equating people with their impairments Indirect references influence people but this can also be influenced by the individual. Facility Names – Project Advance vs. Let the students come up with a name that would enhance a negative image. For example: Slow starters. OH: Why are the Following Facilities Named as they Are?
  • - non-verbal information – where we don ’t use language – understanding how wood joins together to make a table - puzzles
  • Norm-referenced – have been administered to large groups of children More than 1 form = can be assessed more than once without being overly – practiced – in situations where might want to assess pre- and post- to determine progress Standard administration – very precise instructions have been to given, and strict criteria for scoring and adminisitration Does it test what it says it does
  • Diagnostic tests – those that are trying to pin-point the difficulty the student is experiencing as opposed to describing reading level – trying to discover the HOW Writing does not tend to be among the standarized tests as it is much more difficulty to assess this way Notion of batteries – often try to come up with one “package”that will test everything – example with respect to academic tests is the WRAT series – reading out of context, spelling, math
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Successful PostSecondary Student
    • 2. Website - Agenda
    • 3. What are you going to takeaway from what we haveto say? What choices will you make?
    • 4. What has that got to do withschool?
    • 5. It is all about choice – andwhat you deem is important Because we can teach you nothing…. Unless you want to learn And if you do not want to be here – you are free to leave – today If you stay – you commit to 9 days of building your post-secondary to be a foundation for the next 6 years What do you want to take away from today? How are we going to do that together?
    • 6. Rules of Engagement Willbe common to all university classrooms Student code of conduct Expectations for my sessions
    • 7. You can do this What will you choose?
    • 8. 2001 Statistics Population Sampled (15 years and older) = 23 901 360 or about 24 000 000 6 173 225 start university = 24% 3 687 650 complete degree = 15% 642 055 complete a masters = 2.6% 128 625 complete a PhD = .5%
    • 9. Social Role As Defined by Sociologist Talcott ParsonsA Social Role may be defined as a socially expected pattern… of behaviours, responsibilities, expectations, and privileges.
    • 10. Characteristics of the Successful Student What do they look like? What don’t they look like? How do they behave? How don’t they behave? Divide into 4 groups
    • 11. CharacteristicsWhat do they look like? What don’t they look like?1. “smart” – glasses, reading 1. Rumpled 2. Scruffy2. Carries backpack 3. Baggy clothes3. Well dressed 4. Intoxicated4. Carries books 5. Parties all the time5. Conservative 6. Bags under their clothing eyes
    • 12. CharacteristicsHow do they How don’t they Behave? behave?1. Motivated 1. Lazy2. Articulate 2. Disrespectful3. Well spoken 3. Hostile
    • 13. Images of Students
    • 14. Age? Gender? Diversity? Who will be in your classes?
    • 15. Social Role of the Student of behaviour responsibilities – Expectations –and privileges –What are these for a student
    • 16. Social Role of the Student of behaviour, - doing work responsibilities - studying, completing assignments, attending class Expectations – you will work hard, you will fulfill all class requirements and privileges – access to library, access to funding, access to student services, reduced rates for museums, travel, ability to choose courses, create own time table
    • 17. Roles Powerfully Impact Upon: Image in eyes of others ~ status & reputation Image in own eyes ~ self-image Acceptance and belonging Associations and relationships Autonomy and freedom Personal growth and development Opportunities Material side of life Lifestyle
    • 18. What other Social Roles Do You Hold· It is useful to make a list of the roles that you hold in your life.· These may include some of the following common roles:· Spouse, child, parent, sibling, worker, friend, profession, hobbyist, voluntary worker, older person.
    • 19. What Happens when RolesConflict?
    • 20. Social Roles and LDsConnection Terminology re LD  Permanent disability – tied to rights  Neurological dysfunction in one or more of the psychological processes related to learning Learn “differently” vs Learning Disability Concept of “passing” Concept of “comorbidity” stopped here
    • 21. There are both positiveand negative socialroles.List positive social rolesand negative ones
    • 22. The Social Definition ofDevaluation A person becomes perceived or defined as devalued…1. By being different from others…2. In one or more dimensions…3. Which are perceived as significant by a majority or ruling segment of a society…4. Who value this difference negatively.
    • 23. Society Devalues Certain Qualities &Conditions
    • 24. Minority groups WidelyDevalued in Western Society Those impaired in  Senses – vision, hearing  Body – CP, epilespy, etc  Mind – psychiatric illness, intellectual disability Those see as disordered in behavior  Activity level – hyperactive, lethargic  Self-destructive , substance dependent  Sexual orientation or conduct Socially rebellious  Lawless, delinquent, imprisioned  dissident Wolf Wolfsenberger - Syracuse University Training Institute
    • 25. Minority groups WidelyDevalued in Western Society The poor Those with few or unwanted skills  Illiterate  unemployed Those“unassimilated” for other reasons:  Age – unborn, newborn, aged  Race, nationality, ethnicity  religion
    • 26. So what do we do about it?Minimize devaluation...Maximizevalued social roles…
    • 27. By paying attention to…the socially expected pattern of behaviours, responsibilities, expectations, and privileges,…of a University Student
    • 28. We accomplish this through rolecommunicators What are role communicators?
    • 29. Role Communicators1. The structure & context of the physical environment University Campus vs. separate space
    • 30. Role Communicators1. The people associated with a person or group, including clients, staff, others
    • 31. Role Communicators The behaviours that are expected, demanded, shaped, & acted out
    • 32. Role Communicators con’t.4. The language that is used:a. Direct address to people a. Dr. vs. Sir vs. Missb. Indirect references to peoplec. Names of services processes, including activities, staff titlesd. Facility/service names a. Student Affairs vs. Student, Community and Leadership Development
    • 33. Role Communicators con’t.5. Other imagery attached to a person or group 1. stereotypes
    • 34. Awareness/Advocacy Why at present at beginning of program?
    • 35. STEPS TO LEARNING Senses Processing Memory Expression
    • 36. Senses Eyes, ears, mouth, skin
    • 37. Processing* breakdown starting here often defines an LD Visual Processing Auditory Processing Tactile (skin) Kinesthetic Processing (body movement) Speed of processing crucial factor in interpreting information
    • 38. Concrete Example ofProcessing Rick Lavoie Processing
    • 39. Memory  Working ***  Short Term  Long Term
    • 40. Expression Speaking Reading Writing
    • 41. Breakdown in Pathways General way of explaining what a learning disability is - breakdown or slowdown of pathways that process, interpret, express information
    • 42. Learning Disabilities:A new definitionLearning Disabilities Association ofOntario (LDAO)2001
    • 43. “Learning Disabilities” refers to a variety of disorders that affect the acquisition, retention, understanding organization or use ofverbal and/or non-verbal information
    • 44. These disorders result from impairments in one ormore psychological processes related tolearning,in combination with otherwise average abilitiesessential for thinking and reasoning.
    • 45. “Psychological Processes” - An evolving list that has focused on functions such as: phonological processing memory and attention processing speed
    • 46. Learning disabilities are specific not globalimpairments and as such are distinct fromintellectual disabilities.
    • 47. Learning disabilities range in severity andinvariable interfere with the acquisition and useof one or more of the following important skills:  Orallanguage (e.g., listening, speaking, understanding)  Reading (e.g., decoding, comprehension)  Written language (e.g., spelling, written expression)  Mathematics (e.g., computation, problem solving)
    • 48. Learning disabilities may also cause difficultieswith organizational skills, social perception andsocial interaction.
    • 49. The impairments are generally life-long.However, their effects may be expresseddifferently over time, depending on the matchbetween the demands of the environment andthe individual’s characteristics.
    • 50. Common Elements Regardlessof Definition  Neurological dysfunction  Uneven growth pattern and psychological processing deficits  Difficulty in academic and learning tasks  Discrepancy between achievement and potential  Exclusion of other causes
    • 51. Now we have a sense of whata LD is How do we assess one?
    • 52. Traditional AssessmentRely on standardized / formal tests Use scores to compare student’s progress with others “norm-referenced” Tests available in more than 1 form Standard administration Contains grade norms, age norms, percentiles Information on validity of the test
    • 53. Traditional AssessmentCaveats What are the limitations of the tests you are using Use multiple sources of data when possible to get a more accurate picture
    • 54. Standardized TestsReading- Nelson-Denny Test of Reading Comprehension (Vocab/Comp/Rate)Diagnostic Reading- Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests - RevisedLanguage- Peabody Picture vocabulary testVisual – Motor- Bender
    • 55. Types of Standardized TestsTests of Mental Abilities and Processes IQ WISC – III – Wechsler Intellignce Scale for Children > 16 – WAIS – Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Stanford-Binet Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (KAB-C)

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