Final Undergraduate Studies August 2010 Rose Patterson

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  • PERSONAL STATEMENT – Student Advisor - ROSEMARIE PATTERSON I am marvelously and wonderfully created. I am only one person, but I wear many hats. I am a counselor, teacher, behavior changer, team player, administrator, minister and an advocate for children’s rights. My life is like a book full of mystery, excitement, fascination, passion, and dreams. I was born to be a listener, teacher, inventor, writer, and peace maker. Even at the age of five the dream of sharing myself and creativity was blooming inside of me. I had my own world of make believe. I taught myself how to read and do math by using my brothers’ schoolbooks. I invented my own school. I would place my dolls on the stairwell inside of my home and read to them. My classroom was diverse; I had Ken, Barbie, Chatty Kathy, dolls that walked, crawled, dolls that were big, dolls that were little, dolls that would drink a bottle, and wet, and dolls that looked like me. At first I pretended to be their mother, or sister, and then their teacher. I wrote stories in a personal journal. I became a very creative story teller. My favorite essay was about 21 Kittens. I gave all the kittens a name because they were part of my family. It was so vivid and descriptive that my teacher called my parents to ask if my story was true. I was so proud of that story, it was my masterpiece. Yet, as I matured, I became interested in having relationships with real people. I became a volunteer. I volunteered in a military hospital as a young American Red Cross worker. Yes, I wore the blue and white striped uniform at the age of 15. I spent hours in the pediatrics department which one day changed my life completely. I saw something that the public was not allowed to see. I saw a premature baby girl that weighed less than two pounds. I was amazed to see life so small which could exist in the palm of one hand. That was it; I knew then my purpose in life was to become a nurse and help people. Yet, as I grew older my life made a detour. My passion still was to help others, but in the wrong way. I became the designated driver; a leader which helped con parents; a single parent; a scapegoat; and very co-dependent young person. It was not until I went to Tacoma Community College that I learned the correct way of “helping”, and how to change my own life. Through my college career at Argosy University, I demonstrated and perfected the knowledge that I learned through course studies and written papers. This passion of helping actually grew and manifested itself in the various employments that I obtained. I worked for various organizations for profit and nonprofit. I worked as a case manager for underprivileged women in the Adult Workfirst Program. I became a computing trainer for the Boeing Company. I became an Intern, Emergency responder, and then promoted to Disaster Specialist for the Pierce County American Red Cross. As a first responder I am prepared to assume responsibility when others have failed to act. I became an entrepreneur; gained experience in organization and management. I am currently employed as an Independent Health Care Worker helping persons with disabilities cope with day to day living. I have managed to successfully obtain my education while working a 35 hour work week. I am currently involved with a group of women at the Pierce County Housing Authority called FSS. We are being trained to become mentors and lead other women toward a life of successful living. Now the path in which my life has taken me is one of service, mentorship, and giving. The many experiences I have in helping people work through life’s traumas and disasters have motivated me to fulfill my purpose in life. I have children that are mentally challenged, and one son that was murdered, therefore working with grief issues, hardships are a strong talent that I possess. I am prepared to assume responsibility when others fail to respond. In the future, I plan to work in the counseling and mental health field within the educational facilities. August 2010, I will complete my online education from Argosy University-Phoenix with a Bachelors degree in Psychology. I am in the top 10% of my class graduating with a 3.76 grade point average. I am a member of the National Collegiate honor society. I am interested in working for Tacoma Community College because my passion is helping others. I have previously obtained my Human Services Certificate, worked in the Math department, and the Workfirst program that assisted women and men with many opportunities to become students and or obtain employment within the community. I am prepared to continue my education and obtain my Masters Degree in Psychology while working at the College. I would like to return to the college as a professional Student Advisor, and give back to my alma mater and community. I believe in the stance of achievement and excellence: I believe in turning dreams and passions into reality. I believe that Tacoma Community College will embrace the many talents, achievements, and accomplishments that I bring to the campus environment.
  • PERSONAL STATEMENT – Student Advisor - ROSEMARIE PATTERSON I am marvelously and wonderfully created. I am only one person, but I wear many hats. I am a counselor, teacher, behavior changer, team player, administrator, minister and an advocate for children’s rights. My life is like a book full of mystery, excitement, fascination, passion, and dreams. I was born to be a listener, teacher, inventor, writer, and peace maker. Even at the age of five the dream of sharing myself and creativity was blooming inside of me. I had my own world of make believe. I taught myself how to read and do math by using my brothers’ schoolbooks. I invented my own school. I would place my dolls on the stairwell inside of my home and read to them. My classroom was diverse; I had Ken, Barbie, Chatty Kathy, dolls that walked, crawled, dolls that were big, dolls that were little, dolls that would drink a bottle, and wet, and dolls that looked like me. At first I pretended to be their mother, or sister, and then their teacher. I wrote stories in a personal journal. I became a very creative story teller. My favorite essay was about 21 Kittens. I gave all the kittens a name because they were part of my family. It was so vivid and descriptive that my teacher called my parents to ask if my story was true. I was so proud of that story, it was my masterpiece. Yet, as I matured, I became interested in having relationships with real people. I became a volunteer. I volunteered in a military hospital as a young American Red Cross worker. Yes, I wore the blue and white striped uniform at the age of 15. I spent hours in the pediatrics department which one day changed my life completely. I saw something that the public was not allowed to see. I saw a premature baby girl that weighed less than two pounds. I was amazed to see life so small which could exist in the palm of one hand. That was it; I knew then my purpose in life was to become a nurse and help people. Yet, as I grew older my life made a detour. My passion still was to help others, but in the wrong way. I became the designated driver; a leader which helped con parents; a single parent; a scapegoat; and very co-dependent young person. It was not until I went to Tacoma Community College that I learned the correct way of “helping”, and how to change my own life. Through my college career at Argosy University, I demonstrated and perfected the knowledge that I learned through course studies and written papers. This passion of helping actually grew and manifested itself in the various employments that I obtained. I worked for various organizations for profit and nonprofit. I worked as a case manager for underprivileged women in the Adult Workfirst Program. I became a computing trainer for the Boeing Company. I became an Intern, Emergency responder, and then promoted to Disaster Specialist for the Pierce County American Red Cross. As a first responder I am prepared to assume responsibility when others have failed to act. I became an entrepreneur; gained experience in organization and management. I am currently employed as an Independent Health Care Worker helping persons with disabilities cope with day to day living. I have managed to successfully obtain my education while working a 35 hour work week. I am currently involved with a group of women at the Pierce County Housing Authority called FSS. We are being trained to become mentors and lead other women toward a life of successful living. Now the path in which my life has taken me is one of service, mentorship, and giving. The many experiences I have in helping people work through life’s traumas and disasters have motivated me to fulfill my purpose in life. I have children that are mentally challenged, and one son that was murdered, therefore working with grief issues, hardships are a strong talent that I possess. I am prepared to assume responsibility when others fail to respond. In the future, I plan to work in the counseling and mental health field within the educational facilities. August 2010, I will complete my online education from Argosy University-Phoenix with a Bachelors degree in Psychology. I am in the top 10% of my class graduating with a 3.76 grade point average. I am a member of the National Collegiate honor society. I am interested in working for Tacoma Community College because my passion is helping others. I have previously obtained my Human Services Certificate, worked in the Math department, and the Workfirst program that assisted women and men with many opportunities to become students and or obtain employment within the community. I am prepared to continue my education and obtain my Masters Degree in Psychology while working at the College. I would like to return to the college as a professional Student Advisor, and give back to my alma mater and community. I believe in the stance of achievement and excellence: I believe in turning dreams and passions into reality. I believe that Tacoma Community College will embrace the many talents, achievements, and accomplishments that I bring to the campus environment.
  • I am a lifelong learner and it all started when I was a child. I was born to be a listener, teacher, inventor, writer, and peace maker. Even at the age of five the dream of sharing myself and creativity was blooming inside of me. I had my own world of make believe. I taught myself how to read and do math by using my brothers’ schoolbooks. I invented my own school. I would place my dolls on the stairwell inside of my home and read to them. My classroom was diverse; I had Ken, Barbie, Chatty Kathy, dolls that walked, crawled, dolls that were big, dolls that were little, dolls that would drink a bottle, and wet, and dolls that looked like me. At first I pretended to be their mother, or sister, and then their teacher. I wrote stories in a personal journal. I became a very creative story teller. My favorite essay was about 21 Kittens. I gave all the kittens a name because they were part of my family. It was so vivid and descriptive that my teacher called my parents to ask if my story was true. I was so proud of that story, it was my masterpiece. Yet, as I matured, I became interested in having relationships with real people. I became a volunteer. I volunteered in a military hospital as a young American Red Cross worker. Yes, I wore the blue and white striped uniform at the age of 15. I spent hours in the pediatrics department which one day changed my life completely. I saw something that the public was not allowed to see. I saw a premature baby girl that weighed less than two pounds. I was amazed to see life so small which could exist in the palm of one hand. That was it; I knew then my purpose in life was to become a nurse and help people. Yet, as I grew older my life made a detour. My passion still was to help others, but in the wrong way. I became the designated driver; a leader which helped con parents; a single parent; a scapegoat; and very co-dependent young person. It was not until I went to Tacoma Community College that I learned the correct way of “helping”, and how to change my own life. Through my college career at Argosy University, I demonstrated and perfected the knowledge that I learned through course studies and written papers. This passion of helping actually grew and manifested itself in the various employments that I obtained. I worked for various organizations for profit and nonprofit. I worked as a case manager for underprivileged women in the Adult Workfirst Program. I became a computing trainer for the Boeing Company. I became an Intern, Emergency responder, and then promoted to Disaster Specialist for the Pierce County American Red Cross. As a first responder I am prepared to assume responsibility when others have failed to act. I became an entrepreneur; gained experience in organization and management. I am currently employed as an Independent Health Care Worker helping persons with disabilities cope with day to day living. I have managed to successfully obtain my education while working a 35 hour work week. I am currently involved with a group of women at the Pierce County Housing Authority called FSS. We are being trained to become mentors and lead other women toward a life of successful living. Now the path in which my life has taken me is one of service, mentorship, and giving. The many experiences I have in helping people work through life’s traumas and disasters have motivated me to fulfill my purpose in life. I have children that are mentally challenged, and one son that was murdered, therefore working with grief issues, hardships are a strong talent that I possess. Every experience that I engulf, I learn a lesson in which I store in my memory. When I come upon a situation that is difficult, I draw upon the knowledge that I have stored in my mind. I am a lifelong learner and I am willing to educate myself repeatedly grasping new concepts and models to follow. What is so good about being a lifelong learner is that I still have the energy and desire to help others get to the stage of life that I embellish.
  • Final Undergraduate Studies August 2010 Rose Patterson

    1. 1. Undergraduate Studies ePortfolio Rosemarie Patterson Psychology 2010
    2. 2. Personal Statement <ul><li>PERSONAL STATEMENT – Student Advisor - ROSEMARIE PATTERSON </li></ul><ul><li>I am marvelously and wonderfully created. I am only one person, but I wear many hats. I am a counselor, teacher, behavior changer, team player, administrator, minister and an advocate for children’s rights. My life is like a book full of mystery, excitement, fascination, passion, and dreams. </li></ul><ul><li>I was born to be a listener, teacher, inventor, writer, and peace maker. Even at the age of five the dream of sharing myself and creativity was blooming inside of me. I had my own world of make believe. I taught myself how to read and do math by using my brothers’ schoolbooks. I invented my own school. I would place my dolls on the stairwell inside of my home and read to them. My classroom was diverse; I had Ken, Barbie, Chatty Kathy, dolls that walked, crawled, dolls that were big, dolls that were little, dolls that would drink a bottle, and wet, and dolls that looked like me. At first I pretended to be their mother, or sister, and then their teacher. I wrote stories in a personal journal. </li></ul><ul><li>I became a very creative story teller. My favorite essay was about 21 Kittens. I gave all the kittens a name because they were part of my family. It was so vivid and descriptive that my teacher called my parents to ask if my story was true. I was so proud of that story, it was my masterpiece. Yet, as I matured, I became interested in having relationships with real people. I became a volunteer. </li></ul><ul><li>I volunteered in a military hospital as a young American Red Cross worker. Yes, I wore the blue and white striped uniform at the age of 15. I spent hours in the pediatrics department which one day changed my life completely. I saw something that the public was not allowed to see. I saw a premature baby girl that weighed less than two pounds. I was amazed to see life so small which could exist in the palm of one hand. </li></ul><ul><li>That was it; I knew then my purpose in life was to become a nurse and help people. Yet, as I grew older my life made a detour. My passion still was to help others, but in the wrong way. </li></ul><ul><li>I became the designated driver; a leader which helped con parents; a single parent; a scapegoat; and very co-dependent young person. It was not until I went to Tacoma Community College that I learned the correct way of “helping”, and how to change my own life. Through my college career at Argosy University, I demonstrated and perfected the knowledge that I learned through course studies and written papers. This passion of helping actually grew and manifested itself in the various employments that I obtained. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Personal Statement cont. 2 <ul><li>I worked for various organizations for profit and nonprofit. I worked as a case manager for underprivileged women in the Adult Workfirst Program. I became a computing trainer for the Boeing Company. I became an Intern, Emergency responder, and then promoted to Disaster Specialist for the Pierce County American Red Cross. As a first responder I am prepared to assume responsibility when others have failed to act. I became an entrepreneur; gained experience in organization and management. I am currently employed as an Independent Health Care Worker helping persons with disabilities cope with day to day living. I have managed to successfully obtain my education while working a 35 hour work week. I am currently involved with a group of women at the Pierce County Housing Authority called FSS. We are being trained to become mentors and lead other women toward a life of successful living. Now the path in which my life has taken me is one of service, mentorship, and giving. </li></ul><ul><li>The many experiences I have in helping people work through life’s traumas and disasters have motivated me to fulfill my purpose in life. I have children that are mentally challenged, and one son that was murdered, therefore working with grief issues, hardships are a strong talent that I possess. I am prepared to assume responsibility when others fail to respond. </li></ul><ul><li>In the future, I plan to work in the counseling and mental health field within the educational facilities. August 2010, I will complete my online education from Argosy University-Phoenix with a Bachelors degree in Psychology. I am in the top 10% of my class graduating with a 3.76 grade point average. I am a member of the National Collegiate honor society. </li></ul><ul><li>I am interested in working for Tacoma Community College because my passion is helping others. I have previously obtained my Human Services Certificate, worked in the Math department, and the Workfirst program that assisted women and men with many opportunities to become students and or obtain employment within the community. I am prepared to continue my education and obtain my Masters Degree in Psychology while working at the College. I would like to return to the college as a professional Student Advisor, and give back to my alma mater and community. I believe in the stance of achievement and excellence: I believe in turning dreams and passions into reality. I believe that Tacoma Community College will embrace the many talents, achievements, and accomplishments that I bring to the campus environment. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Resume <ul><li>ROSMARIE PATTERSON </li></ul><ul><li>Spanaway, Washington 98387 </li></ul><ul><li>Telephone (253) 314-4390 Email rpatters777@ aol.com </li></ul><ul><li>SUMMARY </li></ul><ul><li>Well-organized, detail-oriented highly skilled office and administrative professional with special experience as an instructor, counselor, case manager, licensed agent, and an independent health care worker. Excellent interpersonal communication skills with a strong academic record. Professional telephone etiquette and efficient customer service provider. Earned Bachelor Degree in Psychology with a minor in Chemical Dependency. </li></ul><ul><li>EXPERIENCE </li></ul><ul><li>LONG TERM CARE AND AGENCY – COPES PROGRAM, Tacoma, WA </li></ul><ul><li>Independent Health Care Provider </li></ul><ul><li>Provide medical health care assistance for clients that are disabled </li></ul><ul><li>Respond to client’s daily living needs -Assist clients in moving of limbs </li></ul><ul><li>Assist and train clients in personal grooming and housekeeping </li></ul><ul><li>Transport clients to doctor, mental health, and dental appointments </li></ul><ul><li>Prepared meals for clients and educated clients in microwave food preparation </li></ul><ul><li>Tutor clients in math, reading and spelling </li></ul><ul><li>Provided counseling services for client </li></ul><ul><li>Mandated reporter of physical and mental abuse - Adhere to rules of confidentiality and informed consent </li></ul><ul><li>TACOMA COMMUNITY COLLEGE, Tacoma, WA </li></ul><ul><li>Program Specialist – Case Management </li></ul><ul><li>Responsible for Case Management for pre-employment graduates </li></ul><ul><li>Provided limited counseling sessions for students with barriers to employment </li></ul><ul><li>Responsible for maintaining case load files: Provided retention services </li></ul><ul><li>Assist Student with Housing Issues, homelessness, utility shutoffs – Resource for obtaining Section 8 government Housing for Students, resources for car insurance </li></ul><ul><li>Assist student with compute questions, resumes, cover letters and thank you letters </li></ul><ul><li>Assist in job search – provide job leads to graduated students, act as liaison between Public Community Agencies – provided written student enrollment verifications </li></ul><ul><li>KEYBANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Tacoma, WA </li></ul><ul><li>Customer Service Clerk, NW Region CIS department </li></ul><ul><li>Assisted Hispanic co-worker with daily operations and provided translation of duties when necessary </li></ul><ul><li>Responsible for maintaining customer accounts </li></ul><ul><li>LEAN ON ME, Tacoma, WA </li></ul><ul><li>Business Owner </li></ul><ul><li>Assist firms to organize offices-Established multi-filing systems for recycling corporation </li></ul><ul><li>PRIMERICA INSURANCE, Tacoma, WA </li></ul><ul><li>State of Washington Certified Life/Health Insurance Agent </li></ul><ul><li>Sold insurance products and guided clients in money management. Awards for Seller of the Month, and Recruiter of the Month </li></ul>
    5. 5. Resume cont. 2 <ul><li>COMMERCIAL CREDIT CORPORATION, Federal Way, WA </li></ul><ul><li>Credit Representative </li></ul><ul><li>Sold and completed initial customer applications for signature, second mortgage, and home improvement loans – Agents license </li></ul><ul><li>H & R BLOCK, Tacoma WA </li></ul><ul><li>Tax Representative 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Prepared individual taxes to be submitted to Internal Revenue Service </li></ul><ul><li>BOEING, Tukwila, WA </li></ul><ul><li>Training Administrator/Instructor, “Off Hours” Training Department </li></ul><ul><li>Responsible for providing PC and keyboarding instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Verified and forecast employee training needs assessment for scheduled classes </li></ul><ul><li>Proctored PC exams for the nationwide personal computing certification program </li></ul><ul><li>Issued completion certificates to employees </li></ul><ul><li>Assisted with course material development </li></ul><ul><li>Received Pi Award for reducing training costs </li></ul><ul><li>USWEST </li></ul><ul><li>Legal Secretary and Human Resources Clerk </li></ul><ul><li>Typed legal briefs for litigation </li></ul><ul><li>Updated blueprints for Engineering Department </li></ul><ul><li>Handled customer complaints as dispatch clerk </li></ul><ul><li>COMMUNITY INVOLVEMNT </li></ul><ul><li>Pierce County Housing Authority – FSS Member </li></ul><ul><li>Provide mentorship for young women living in the housing authority section 8 homes </li></ul><ul><li>Preparing for leadership and homeownership </li></ul><ul><li>Metropolitan Park District </li></ul><ul><li>Cooking instructor for elementary children after school program </li></ul><ul><li>EDUCATION </li></ul><ul><li>Argosy University-Phoenix </li></ul><ul><li>Bachelor Degree in Psychology </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical Dependency minor </li></ul><ul><li>National Honor Society </li></ul><ul><li>Graduating in top 10% of senior class with 3.76 grade point average </li></ul><ul><li>Tacoma Community College </li></ul><ul><li>Human Services </li></ul><ul><li>Human Services Certification– Chemical Dependency Program Minor </li></ul><ul><li>Pierce College </li></ul><ul><li>Associate of Arts Degree in Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Legal Secretary Certification </li></ul><ul><li>Dean’s Honor roll </li></ul><ul><li>Boeing </li></ul><ul><li>Training Instructor Certification </li></ul><ul><li>Completed more than 60 on the job training courses, including software, time management, instruction skills, team building, supervisory management courses, and writing/composition and customer service. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Reflection <ul><li>Reflection of My Education </li></ul><ul><li>On July 19, 2000 I completed a 5 year mission plan. It went like this: In five years, I plan to be financially secure working in the field of Human Services. My expectations are very high; therefore, I set high goals. My ultimate goal is to become a successful business owner in operating sever chains of Adult Family Homes. I completed the training but it never happened. My mission was to provide a peaceful family setting for each of the residents with lots of activities and fun things to do. I was excited and definitely thrilled about my five-year plan. Then life happened. </li></ul><ul><li>It is now 2004 and I completed my Human Services Degree program at Tacoma Community College and I was ready to get started on my goals by obtaining a Bachelors Degree in Psychology. My son was murdered and everything halted in my life. Goals were forgotten, education was put on the back burner, and my life slowed down. But I was still breathing and eventually in 2008 I returned to college at Argosy University Online. Thank God for online universities. Now it is 2010 and I will finish what I started back in the year 2000. </li></ul><ul><li>The hardest class that I experienced was Statistics… The first time I took the class I got a big fat “F”. Second time I got a C+ and then the third time I got a B. What I have learned from that experience was one of humility, never give up, and that I “hate” statistics. I have received As in my other classes and Bs in Science. This has been a real challenging experience at Argosy for me but I am a life long learner and I predict if I took statistics one more time – the odds of getting an A are great! </li></ul><ul><li>Also according to my overall education my abilities were rated below pertains to cognitive abilities, understanding research methods, depicting communication skills: oral and written, understanding diversity, identifying ethics, embracing diversity, and applying psychology and impersonal effectiveness. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Reflection cont. 2 <ul><li>My Cognitive abilities: Critical Thinking given a psychological issue, I am able to employ skeptical inquiry and a scientific approach. I have extensive exposure and capable to formulate reasoned opinions on a wide range of psychological perspectives and theories within written and oral presentations. I am able to analyze and appraise the complexities of a given issue. I am able to express myself in written work or orally. I am able to collect and arrange information from many sources pertinent to the topic differentiating between pros and cons for the subject at hand. </li></ul><ul><li>Research: Understanding Research Methods: I am highly capable of performing research and using peer reviewed and other statistical and other evaluated tools for finding such articles. I have extensive exposure in using sound reasoning as a basis for criticizing research results. </li></ul><ul><li>Communications skills: Oral and Written. I have extensive exposure in presenting psychological concepts orally as appropriate to the audience. I am able to apply appropriate levels of conciseness and clarity in content, language use, grammar and organization using APA formatting. Ability to challenge or defend a particular stance related to psychological concepts in written work. </li></ul><ul><li>Ethics: I can identify issues and challenges related to ethics in the field of Psychology. I have extensive exposure to engage in ethical thinking and action evidenced by my ability to articulate best-practices pertaining to case examples and other problems associated with the field. I can recognize breaches in ethical practices in psychology and can construct alternative analyses and choices of behaviors. I also promote ethical decision making and act accordingly. </li></ul>
    8. 8. Table of Contents <ul><li>Cognitive Abilities: Critical Thinking and Information Literacy Slide………… 8 - 13 </li></ul><ul><li>Research Skills Slide……………………. 14 - 24 </li></ul><ul><li>Communication Skills: Oral and Written…….25 -27 </li></ul><ul><li>Ethics and Diversity Awareness……………..28 - 34 </li></ul><ul><li>Foundations of Psychology………………….35 - 44 </li></ul><ul><li>Applied Psychology………………………….45 - 48 </li></ul><ul><li>Interpersonal Effectiveness…………………..49 -53 </li></ul><ul><li>My Future in Learning……………………….54-56 </li></ul><ul><li>Contact Me……………………………………57 </li></ul>
    9. 9. Critical Thinking <ul><li>Heal Yourself </li></ul><ul><li>Rosemarie Patterson </li></ul><ul><li>Pleneurethics, a way of life </li></ul>
    10. 10. Critical Thinking cont 2 <ul><li>Heal Yourself </li></ul><ul><li>Rosemarie Patterson </li></ul><ul><li>Pleneurethics, a way of life </li></ul><ul><li>The Brain, Heart, Body and Soul (mind) are unique in every </li></ul><ul><li>aspect. The four entities bond together to control the human entity </li></ul><ul><li>called the being. The branches work together as a deeply rooted tree </li></ul><ul><li>by the riverside. Every part of the body is a branch and every branch </li></ul><ul><li>is connected to the head. The head cannot survive and function on its </li></ul><ul><li>own to maintain the life in the body. When one or more members of </li></ul><ul><li>the body, ceases to function properly then an imbalance occurs. </li></ul><ul><li>Turmoil is evident, and the imbalance causes the roles of the four </li></ul><ul><li>major entities to shift. </li></ul><ul><li>If the brain slows down or works overtime an imbalance in the whole </li></ul><ul><li>body occurs. In Pleneurethics, mind and body are not the same but </li></ul><ul><li>are separated from one another by the brain. The brain, a biological </li></ul><ul><li>tissue, interrelates both with mind and with body. The brain is a </li></ul><ul><li>demarcation terminal, a &quot;biological buffer,&quot; a sensitive device for </li></ul><ul><li>transliterating conditions of body into sensations meaningful to mind, </li></ul><ul><li>or activities of mind into commands for somatic activity. 1 </li></ul><ul><li>1 Journal o f Pleneurethics, Volume 5 Number 1, page </li></ul>
    11. 11. Critical Thinking cont. 3 <ul><li>The head (brain) is the control center, it sends signals to the </li></ul><ul><li>body, the leg to move, eye to blink, a muscle to twitch and it also </li></ul><ul><li>demands the heart to pump. </li></ul><ul><li>The heart is the ever beating pulse that pumps water and </li></ul><ul><li>nourishment (blood) throughout the body. It is the reservoir of life. It </li></ul><ul><li>supplies vitality to every blood vessel, arteries and cells within the </li></ul><ul><li>structure of the body. </li></ul><ul><li>The body houses the being and keeps everything intact within </li></ul><ul><li>its boundaries. The brain, in all its glory and all other organs are </li></ul><ul><li>contained and subjected to the boundaries and limitations within the </li></ul><ul><li>walls of the body. </li></ul><ul><li>The soul is the everlasting spirituality housed within the body. It </li></ul><ul><li>is fed and nourished by all the teachings learned and passed to you </li></ul><ul><li>from family, teachers, friends basically from relationships and the </li></ul><ul><li>absolute power. Spirituality is what we believe about the meaning of </li></ul><ul><li>life, the existence of ourselves, other and a deity which we will call </li></ul><ul><li>the absolute. </li></ul><ul><li>Man has created many remedies to keep life going, whether it </li></ul><ul><li>is medications, operations, biopsies, implants, amputations, valves </li></ul><ul><li>and or replacements. Man can fix it! Or can he? The soul is one </li></ul>
    12. 12. Critical Thinking cont. 4 <ul><li>entity that can not be manually &quot;fixed&quot;. It survives on relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>Without relationships in this thing we call the &quot;human being&quot; the soul </li></ul><ul><li>diminishes and the whole being suffers. </li></ul><ul><li>Even in the depth of the mentally challenge, the soul exists. </li></ul><ul><li>Good, strong, loving relationships send messages to the soul to send </li></ul><ul><li>impulses to the brain, and then the brain forwards it to the heart and </li></ul><ul><li>body. When all of this happens, the entities work together as glue and </li></ul><ul><li>heal the being holistically. But when one or more entities malfunction </li></ul><ul><li>or an imbalance occurs, this is where the absolute power comes into </li></ul><ul><li>play. </li></ul><ul><li>The absolute power steps in and provides balance to the being </li></ul><ul><li>when it is in turmoil. The absolute is the supreme, guardian or keeper </li></ul><ul><li>of the holistic body. This absolute power works as a catalyst which </li></ul><ul><li>promotes healing among the being. </li></ul><ul><li>The absolute works as an attachment or bond and it can be </li></ul><ul><li>found in the form of relationships. Carl Roger's theory about </li></ul><ul><li>relationships between the child and his or her major care takers is the </li></ul><ul><li>most significant factor in development. He believed that all have the </li></ul><ul><li>need to be loved. </li></ul>
    13. 13. Critical Thinking cont. 5 <ul><li>culture and members of the human community. Socialization into a </li></ul><ul><li>group is what makes us human. </li></ul><ul><li>A person develops a personality through learned behavior. The </li></ul><ul><li>behavior can be influenced through family, peer, teachers, </li></ul><ul><li>professionals and daily contact. If there is no socialization that exists, </li></ul><ul><li>then the personality is underdeveloped, stunted and retardation </li></ul><ul><li>becomes quite evident in the being. To develop an acceptable </li></ul><ul><li>personality, healthy socialization must exist. I believe a person has </li></ul><ul><li>the ability to change his or her personality by changing their social </li></ul><ul><li>environment. With the assistance of good counseling techniques and </li></ul><ul><li>responses, using the behavior modification principles and working </li></ul><ul><li>through the helping map guidelines, a person will have the tools and </li></ul><ul><li>opportunity to overcome personality retardation.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>According to Piaget, a reference: Wadsworth, B.J. (1996). </li></ul><ul><li>Piaget's theory of cognitive behavior and moral reasoning and moral </li></ul><ul><li>behavior in children. Certain stages of life children learn and grow </li></ul><ul><li>into responsible adults. Children grow through stages which is a </li></ul><ul><li>common process as they learn to reason. </li></ul><ul><li>5 </li></ul><ul><li>4 Ibid </li></ul><ul><li>5 Wadsw,orth, B.J. (1996) </li></ul><ul><li>This is not the complete paper – this was published in the book of Pleneurethics </li></ul>
    14. 14. Research <ul><li>Moral Dilemmas: Professionals and Parents vs. Child Responsibility </li></ul><ul><li>Rosemarie Patterson </li></ul><ul><li>Psychology 492 </li></ul><ul><li>Argosy University </li></ul>
    15. 15. Death of a child 1 <ul><li>Moral Dilemmas: Professionals and Parents vs. Child Responsibility </li></ul><ul><li>In this essay, the author will provided an ethical assessment of a case in 2009 in Federal Way, Washington in which involved the rape of a minor by an adult in which a child was conceived and died at birth by: setting out a brief summary of the facts; stating several key ethical issues and moral dilemmas; and considering critical pro and con arguments. The professional has code of ethics, HIPPA laws, confidentiality rules to follow, and the informed consent, but the parent is basically an uncontrollable entity unless placed in check through observation or findings of violations to children’s rights by the State or its agencies (Child Protective Services, Teachers, Medical professionals, police, and legal system) (APA, 2002). </li></ul>
    16. 16. Death of a child 2 <ul><li>The problem area is at what age or maturity level does the child legally accepts total responsibility for their own actions? When does the parent assume no responsibility for the behavior of the child? Are we giving professionals and others too much responsibility in not reporting to parents? Are professionals to blame when a child gets pregnant and the parent is not informed? Are we giving children too much responsibility to care for themselves? This concerns the HIPPA Laws, consent of confidentiality, and legal ramifications that could follow a moral dilemma (APA, 2002). There is a legal case in which a teenager delivers a baby at home without the knowledge of the parent, then the baby dies and 911 is not called in a timely manner. The parent suspected pregnancy but did not follow through medically. The parent just issued threats </li></ul>
    17. 17. Death of a child 3 <ul><li>of putting teen out of the residence. Should the teen have told her mother about her pregnancy, should the teen called 911, should the doctor perform pregnancy test upon request of mother, should the teen be charged with neglect or should the mother be charged with neglect. Who is responsible for the death of the child: the parent, the teen or the doctor that did not perform the examination? Should this be a shared endeavor? These are ethical dilemmas which could set a precedent for parental and professional responsibility. </li></ul><ul><li>The revised question is where does parental responsibility end and a child’s responsibility begin. Another or continuing research would be to answer is there a difference between responsibility bearing age of males and females? The scope of this review was who is responsible for the death of the child: the parent, the teen or the professional? Should this be a shared endeavor? These are ethical dilemmas which could set a precedent for parental and professional responsibility (Washington State Institute for Public Policy, 1996). </li></ul>
    18. 18. Death of a child 4 <ul><li>This paper produced arguments for five types of responsibility relationships: (1) parental, (2) professional, (3) parent and child, (4) shared responsibility with professional, child and parent, and lastly the (5) Child. </li></ul><ul><li>Parental </li></ul><ul><li>There are four references that supported the findings that a parent is responsible for the actions of the child (Inter Press Service English News Wire. 20 Nov. 2009; Deen, 2009; Adoption and parental responsibility, 2004; Book, & Perala-Littunen, 2008). This material would bring into light the progress of children’s rights. This would add to the fact that children are protected and have certain unalienable rights as adults are entitled to (Deen, 2009). This would bring to the paper that parents are responsible for the children that they protect and adults or professionals have to treat the child as a right bearing human. This should present facts that even though rights are issued, the child still suffers. There is a breakdown between the expressed rights of the child vs. the given rights of the child vs. actuality of the rights being allowed by the adult. The child given the right to fair and equal treatment, the child given the right to food, shelter, clothing and not to be tortured can and are not given to a lot of children in the world. Questions are raised are children given too much freedom. Are adults given too much control over the child? When does child responsibility take place (Deen, 2009)? </li></ul>
    19. 19. Death of a child 5 <ul><li>The child has rights and the parents have rights, but the child’s rights are demanded to be protected by the parent, however; in actuality, the state is supreme to the parent, and even though we are progressing, millions of children will still suffer according to Inter Press Service English News Wire. 20 Nov. 2009. Another observation of parent responsibility in the adoption realm, are that adoptive parents just as responsible as birth parents. Are there any differences in parenting skills? This article states that parents are parents regardless of titles (Adoption and parental responsibility, 2004). </li></ul><ul><li>Children Need Their Parents More Than a Pizza in the Fridge; this is an article that talks about parental responsibility in a Finnish newspaper. The aim of this study is to find constraints and construction of parental responsibility by analyzing letters sent by readers to a newspaper on the topic of parenting and parental responsibility. The study takes a procedural approach, focusing on the meanings of responsibility and looking at different aspects of parenthood. Three types of dimensions are explored: beginning, diminished sense of responsibility, and obligated responsibility. These dimensions relate to different meanings of parental responsibility for example: responsibility for making choices. Parental responsibility creates norms for evaluating parental behavior, and the boundaries between adults and children. Children need their parents more than for food; they need nurturing, discipline, and structure also (Book & Perala-Littunen, 2008). </li></ul>
    20. 20. Death of a child 6 <ul><li>Professional </li></ul><ul><li>One reference that supported the findings that the professional was protected by confidentiality and informed consent comes from the American Psychological Association. This professional handbook states that professionals have a code of conduct that they must follow to protect their clients which upholds the rights of the child to privacy (APA, 2002). The professional has code of ethics, HIPPA laws, confidentiality rules to follow (APA, 2002). </li></ul><ul><li>Parent and child </li></ul><ul><li>Four references support the finding that the parent and child are both responsible equally (Arnold & Gemma, 1994; Brannigan, 2005; Van der Ende, Venderink, and van Busschback, 2010; and Walton, 2003). The article from Walton supports the book of Violent Young Children by Glicken in discussing violence within the family until and country putting responsibility of behavior on the parent and child (Walton, 2003). With Success and Satisfaction among Parents with Severe Mental Illness, this article stresses that parents with severe mental illnesses can still parent a child with success and satisfaction. It discusses psychiatric services available. This would explain if a parent having retardation are capable of being competent to parent children and care for their well being. In this article the teenager is suspected to manipulate the mother into overnight stays with her adult boyfriend. What is the reasoning that a parent can not control the child? Does she have the parenting skills necessary to control the teenager or promote positive growth in her home? Is the adult competent to assume responsibility? What age does the child no longer requires the adult to be responsible (Van der Ende, Venderink, and van Busschback, 2010). The aim of this study is to explore the family </li></ul>
    21. 21. Death of a child 7 <ul><li>unit when a child dies. This publication expresses the roles that family members assume when a family member dies. The authors give a mental picture of a family in grief which supports family responsibility (Arnold & Gemma, 1994). The final resource called Ethics across Cultures describes the meaning of ethics and how researchers have to be prepared to explain in different cultures what one does may not be acceptable in another culture. The culture would be parents vs. child, child vs. parents. In this text the rights of humans are explored. This information would contain information that there is a code of ethics for each culture which are governed by boundaries. The aim of this material is to explore parental and children boundaries and the responsibility for the professional to protect the rights of their clients. This would involve informed consent and HIPPA laws that govern client confidentiality. This would bring into view human rights issues, and child protection laws and children’s advocacy (Brannigan, 2005). </li></ul><ul><li>Professional, child and parent </li></ul><ul><li>There were two references that supported this concept: (McConnell, 2004; and Glicken, 2004). The book written by M. D. Glicken will shed light on what happens to children raised in a home without rules, and responsibilities. What is a major influence that brings children to hide information from parents, adults and professionals? This book explains behavior of the child, and the adult in a home that produces violent young children. It produces case studies of children with mental problems. It produces case studies of violent children and what type of environment feeds violence. This book explains the causes of teenage violence and the need to hurt others. The plight against healthy relationships when a parent violates boundaries with their child, and when there are no boundaries for the child to respect (Glicken, 2004). </li></ul>
    22. 22. Death of a child 8 <ul><li>The aim for this writing of Moral Dilemmas would be to explain the dilemma that people face when faced with moral dilemmas (McConnell, 2010). This writing would bring into play the moral dilemma that the teenager was facing before and after she delivered her child. Should she tell her mother about the pregnancy? If she did then her mother would kick her out of the house. Would it be simpler to get rid of the baby instead? Perhaps the father would take the baby, or suppose he wouldn’t. What am I suppose to do? Or the teen could have thought abortion would settle the dilemma, or perhaps it was too late for abortion. Or the teen could have thought if she does nothing, then it will all disappears. The pregnancy test stated I was not pregnant so therefore I am not. So I will do nothing. This writing will convey the thoughts that incur a moral dilemma (McConnell, 2010). Support shared responsibility. </li></ul><ul><li>Child </li></ul><ul><li>Child: the child becomes an adult when impregnated and will assume responsibility of conceived child (Washington State Institute for Public Policy 1996). According to the research it appears that the parent and child share responsibility and the professional is protected from the responsibility. But according to my personal findings, with the medical community once the child becomes impregnated she becomes an adult no matter what her age, she signs her own medical forms for treatment, and the HIPPA laws regarding informed consent and confidentiality are enforced. Therefore, the child who is now deemed an adult is responsible for the protection of their own unborn child that is conceived. The adult is now a parent whom is governed by the laws of society which are outlined by the legal system, and Child Protective Services (Washington State Institute for Public Policy, 1996). The child has rights and the parents have rights, but the child’s rights are demanded to be protected by the parent according to Inter Press Service English News Wire. 20 Nov. 2009. </li></ul>
    23. 23. Death of a child 9 <ul><li>The case involving a teenage girl of Federal Way is yet to be solved. Lifetime on television on July 17, 2010, aired a movie similar to the Federal Way case in which the girl did not tell anybody about her pregnancy. The baby was born in a bathroom stall and out of fear she suffocated her baby to keep it silenced. She was sixteen at the time and was found guilty of not protecting her child and had to serve five years in juvenile detention (Lifetime Movie Network. 2010). Similar case, but there is a twist in the Federal Way case: this teenager is biracial, and thirteen when she became pregnant, and was not at the age of consent to have sex. She was raped, and came from a violent home environment. Is she to be held accountable for the death of her child? Her competency to stand trial has come into play, one psychologist states she is competent and the other states she is incompetent, how is it possible for two professionals to disagree (Vera & Speight 2003). Will competency, worldwide multi- culturism, violent environment, and even having a mentally impaired parent save her from the fate of the sixteen year old? What about the father of the baby, is he responsible? Is responsibility measured different between males and females. Is responsibility different among ethnicities? The professional has code of ethics, HIPPA laws, confidentiality rules to follow, and the informed consent, but the parent is basically an uncontrollable entity unless placed in check through observation or findings of violations to children’s rights by the State or its agencies (Child Protective Services, Teachers, Medical professionals, police, and legal system) (APA, 2002). </li></ul><ul><li>What I have garnered from the references is that there is no set boundary between parent and child responsibility (Glicken, 2004). The quest for answers continues with these additional important questions that could be used for further research for Clinical and Behavioral Psychologists in finding answers for responsibility of child vs. parent, and establishing boundaries (Vera & Speight 2003). </li></ul>
    24. 24. Death of a Child 10 References <ul><li>References </li></ul><ul><li>American Psychological Association. (2002). Ethical principles of psychologists </li></ul><ul><li>And code of conduct. American Psychologist, 57, 1060–1073. </li></ul><ul><li>Arnold, J.H. and Gemma, P. B. (1994). A Child Dies: A Portrait of Family Grief. 2nd Ed . Philadelphia, PA: The Charles Press Publishers </li></ul><ul><li>Book, M. L., and Perala-Littunen, S. Childhood. Children Need Their Parents More Than a Pizza in the Fridge. Parental responsibility in a Finnish newspaper. London: Feb2008.Vol.15. Iss. 1; pg 74 </li></ul><ul><li>Brannigan, M. C. (2005). Ethics across Cultures: An Introductory Text with Readings . New York: McGraw Hill </li></ul><ul><li>Deen, Thalif. Development: Child Rights Progress, but Millions still Suffer. Inter Press Service English News Wire . 20 Nov. 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Glicken M. D. (2004). Violent Young Children . New York: Pearson Education </li></ul><ul><li>Lifetime Movie Network. (2010). Television aired July 17, 2010 on Comcast Cable </li></ul><ul><li>McConnell, Terrance, &quot;Moral Dilemmas”, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2010 Edition) , Edward N. Zalta (ed.) </li></ul><ul><li>Van der Ende, P. C., Venderink, M. M., and van Busschback, J. T. (2010). Psychiatric Services. With Success and Satisfaction among Parents with Severe Mental Illness: Arlington: Apr 2010. Vol. 61, Iss. 4; pg. 416 </li></ul><ul><li>Practice Q&As: Adoption and parental responsibility. (2004, July). Pulse, 33.  Retrieved July 7, 2010, from ProQuest European Business. (Document ID: 667263231). </li></ul><ul><li>Vera, E. M. and Speight, S. L. (2003). Multicultural Competence, Social Justice, and Counseling Psychology: Expanding Our Roles, social justice forum: Loyola University Chicago </li></ul><ul><li>Walton, Stephanie. &quot;When violence hits home.&quot; State Legislatures . 01 Jun. 2003: 31. </li></ul><ul><li>Washington State Institute for Public Policy. Trends in At-Risk Behaviors of Youth in Washington , January 1996 </li></ul>
    25. 25. Communication oral and written <ul><li>Preparing For a Baby </li></ul><ul><li>Rosemarie Patterson </li></ul><ul><li>Argosy University </li></ul>
    26. 26. Communication Oral and written <ul><li>Module 1 Assignment 2 – Rose – Preparing for a Baby </li></ul><ul><li>I would first tell my friends that yes I am enrolled in the Developmental Psychology course but I do not know everything about preparing for a baby and childbirth. I would let them know that I do have a wealth of information because I have reared six children, but I do know that because of their ages it would be wise to obtain prenatal care for Martha so they should decide upon an OBGYN doctor for Martha right away because it is important for Martha to stay healthy so her baby can be healthy also. Martha should probably take prenatal vitamins also. That is the first thing that I would strongly advise my friends to do. While most women give birth to healthy babies, about 3 percent have a major birth defect and these birth defects can be caused by genetic or chromosomal malfunctions. When an abnormality is diagnosed, this information combined with genetic counseling can help parents make early and important decisions about the pregnancy (UCSF, 2008). Then they can seek education on what to expect during pregnancy and after the baby is delivered. Perhaps they would get information on how to take care and nurture their newborn. </li></ul><ul><li>Physician visits would monitor the progress of the mother’s health and that the baby is developing normally, this would put the parents mind at ease. There are various blood testing that is performed on the mother to make sure that she remains healthy, and if she develops anemia, high or low blood sugar, high blood pressure, then the doctor is aware of any changes in her body so that he or she can prevent serious complications for the mother and the fetus. The medical testing would determine if there are abnormalities in the fetus (UCSF, 2008). If abnormalities are found then a decision of early termination can be suggested, or some abnormalities can be fixed with medical intervention or operations (UCSF, 2008). Parent education programs would prepare the new parents for parenting. The programs would also give foundation to their family structure because within some of the parenting courses instruction is given how to respond and what to expect from your infant, toddler, and child during different stages of growth. </li></ul><ul><li>During pregnancy both parents can experience physiological and emotional changes, such as mood swings, short tempers, crying spells, highly emotional episodes, and getting on each other’s nerves. Martha will probably sense a lot of emotional turbulence, but Jeff can go through a lot of turmoil also. Both could question their decisions of becoming parents. They could experience depression and even anger. They could experience lack of self-esteem. They could experience fear that they will not become good parents. Jeff can experience a change in his weight; he can even experience his stomach getting rounder as if he is carrying the baby. So it could be wise that they receive family counseling to address some of the issues that they may go through or are experiencing. Martha and Jeff are considered in the at risk age group in which having an abnormal baby is possible, so they should be made aware of this by their doctor, and it testing should be done to ease their minds. </li></ul><ul><li>It is important that the baby develops well in the womb. Some things that the couple can do to stimulate their infant would be to sing, and talk to the baby. The mother can also relax and listen to music. I have even heard of mothers laying a radio on top of their stomachs for the baby to listen to the music. Also the mother can rock in a rocking chair. The mother can also try to stay calm and not get stressed out. As Martha’s due date arrives, she should become aware of how her body is doing; such as her weight, any swelling of hands, ankles and feet, her appetite, and the movement of her baby. </li></ul><ul><li>If you have a cesarean section delivery this is considered to be major surgery, whereas a vaginal delivery may require a few stitches if necessary from a tear or incision is performed (Parents Magazine.com, 2009). A cesarean delivery the hospital stay is longer could be three or four days. A normal delivery the mother can be released from the hospital the next day. Mother and baby bonding might be affected due to the pain the mother might feel with the cesarean section. The father or another relative or friend might enjoy more bonding and time with the baby, but if the mother is breast feeding then the bonding would perhaps not be interrupted. Recovering is considered more intense for the cesarean delivery because of the actual surgery, the stitches and / or staples (Parents Magazine.com, 2009). The mother may require more pampering and help with the baby because her body is trying to heal from major surgery. With both deliveries the mothers are encouraged to move around and walk. Also a vaginal delivery has a shorter recovery time (Parents Magazine.com, 2009). </li></ul>
    27. 27. Communication Oral and Written 2 References <ul><li>UCSF, Children’s Hospital at Valley care. (2008). Retrieved January 12, 2009 from http://www.ucsfhealth.org/childrens/patient_guide/valleycare/index.html </li></ul><ul><li>Parents Magazine.com (2009) Retrieved January 11, 2009 from http://www.parents.com/pregnancy/labor-delivery/c-sections/vaginal-birth-after-cesarean/ </li></ul>
    28. 28. Ethics and Diversity <ul><li>Ethics and Diversity </li></ul><ul><li>Rosemarie Patterson </li></ul><ul><li>Argosy University 2010 </li></ul>
    29. 29. Ethics and Diversity <ul><li>Discussion on the Internet and how Ethics and Psychology are affected </li></ul><ul><li>Rosemarie Patterson </li></ul><ul><li>Argosy University </li></ul><ul><li>August 2010 </li></ul>
    30. 30. Ethics and Diversity cont. 2 <ul><li>Class Discussion: </li></ul><ul><li>Hi Students 8/17/2010 6:45:59 AM From Professor </li></ul><ul><li>This is your final discussion question. You have all done an outstanding job this session and it has been an honor for me to be your facilitator. Below is a list of articles about the topic of online counseling. As you proceed with your academic and professional development this topic will become more and more important.    Michelene,I agree that protecting privacy is a challenge even in face to face contacts. It still should remain at the forefront of our efforts to provide best practices when delivering services. Good post. Prof. </li></ul><ul><li>Cyberspace Psy 492 M8A2 Patterson, R. Rosemarie Patterson 8/19/2010 12:20:57 AM On the Internet, people disclose more personal, intimate, and sensitive information about themselves to others that they do not know because they feel a relationship exists (Barak &Gluck-Ofri, 2007; Leung, 2002 as cited in Barak & Suler, 2008). Cyberspace in unstoppable and will not cease to exist. We as the future clinicians, psychologists, or therapists need to embrace this new culture that is growing daily. If I could compare the Internet to something, I would compare it to the cell phone. People may have thought the cell phone and the Internet would not be successful, but there is the possibility that there is a phone or Internet service in a lot of households. The Internet is in demand for the teen culture, young adult culture, and adult culture. Even five and six year olds enjoy the use of the Internet and cell phones (Barak & Suler, 2008).Rose Patterson </li></ul><ul><li>Reference </li></ul><ul><li>Barak, A., & Suler, J. (2008). Psychological Aspects of Cyberspace: Theory, Research, Applications (First Ed.). New York: Cambridge University Press. Respond </li></ul>
    31. 31. Ethics and Diversity cont. 3 <ul><li>RE: Cyberspace Psy 492 M8A2 Patterson, R. Classmate 4 8/19/2010 12:50:45 A M In addition to cell phones, there were many who criticized cable television and satellite radio but both have proven to last and are not going anywhere. They have changed our communication through less censorship and offer a wider variety of diversity, much like the internet has. Respond </li></ul><ul><li>RE: Cyberspace Psy 492 M8A2 Patterson, R. Classmate 3 8/19/2010 8:39:39 AM Interesting. I always thought that along with its more personally originated motivators such as escapism, perceived privacy, and solitude (Amichai_Hamburger, 2005; Barak, et al, 2008) that anonymity was the reason people gave out more &quot;personal intimate, and sensitive information via the Internet. Now you have given me another reason for it. Thank you. Good post. References: </li></ul><ul><li>Barak, A., & Suler, J. (2008). Psychological Aspects of Cyberspace: Theory, Research, Applications (1 ed.). New York: Cambridge University Press. Respond </li></ul><ul><li>RE: Cyberspace Psy 492 M8A2 Patterson, R. Classmate 2 8/19/2010 9:41:14 AM Rose, Great post- however, I think Psychology is one field that makes gain for research but actually conducting business over the internet or computer can be viewed as ethically improper in several situations for several reasons. The era of cell phone and internet have created problems in humanity that did not exist before- take Facebook for example-great for networking, finding old friends, professional networking, BUT also been great for stockers, sex offenders, and relationship destruction. Cell phones are great for emergencies, constant contact professionally and personally, and conveniences BUT also cancer causing, causing family disruption, and just another thing we are all required to have and pay for. Not to play the devil's advocate, but all things have actions and consequences- we have to stop believing in all the media put fourth in front of us, we are consumers and they make us believe this is the way of the time and what we need to do because it makes them money, we need to begin to think as individuals choosing what is best for the situation. We must be leaders and not followers, the area of Psychology,  simply put should not become a commercial/ consumer field nor should it be treated as one.   </li></ul>
    32. 32. Ethics and Diversity cont. 4 <ul><li>RE: Cyberspace Psy 492 M8A2 Patterson, R. Rosemarie Patterson 8/19/2010 1:01:40 PM Classmate2, I do not have all the answers but I know that technology is here and the older I get the harder it is for me to allow myself to be open to it. I want to do things the &quot;old&quot; way, but I am learning that I have to be open to new ways of communication or I will not be able to keep up with the new generations. If you want to limit your practice, that is your decision. This is my personal opinion, but I am going to read over the links that Prof. Viventi has provided. I believe therapy is about relationships, and relationships depend upon how we communicate and relate to others. If my future client prefers to communicate over the Internet, perhaps I should be open to this. I admit that I am not comfortable with Facebook, MySpace and now LinkedIn, but I am telling myself I have got to reach out and become familiar with the unknown. My teens have a MySpace page and they are not leery about that way of communication. I do tell them not to give out any personal information such as address, soc security number etc., but I still monitor them because they could be open to predators. In fact, predators and pedophile exist in the neighborhood - so what can you do but communicate with your children about such dangers in person and using technology. Just like in business, we have conference calls and video calls with our clients. I mentioned the web cam in earlier discussion, I am sure that technology has something else that is used. Just try to be open to new ideas. Change is imminent and we as the future in our careers have to embrace, accept, and try to understand this new culture, because it is a culture! (Barak, 1999). Reference </li></ul><ul><li>Barak, A. (1999). Psychological applications on the Internet: A discipline on the threshold of a new millennium. Applied and Preventive Psychology, 8 , 231–246. </li></ul><ul><li>RE: Cyberspace Psy 492 M8A2 Patterson, R. Classmate 2 8/20/2010 9:45:03 AMI am total technology! I am of a generation that grew up using computers and still do on the daily!  I hope I did not sound harsh-I am Just passionate about keeping this industry a lil Old school- it's important! I am open to new ideas but I will also protect my beliefs when it comes down to it and I just feel that with Psychology - technology can assist but ultimately cannot get the job done, it has to come from the therapist! </li></ul>
    33. 33. Ethics and Diversity cont. 5 <ul><li>RE: Cyberspace Psy 492 M8A2 Patterson, R. Classmate 1 8/19/2010 10:59:19 AM Hi Rosemarie: You really drove home a great point and I feel it is really something that I need to think about. The internet is a part of life today and children do not perceive this form of communication any differently from talking or writing. I do see some inherit dangers in the internet and one is primarily giving people information they may not be ready to accept. Can you imagine working with a patient who was sexually molested as a child, suppressed the experience, and find out about the experience through a google search. I have learned so much you and I wish you the best in the future, </li></ul>
    34. 34. Ethics and Diversity cont. 6 <ul><li>RE: Cyberspace Psy 492 M8A2 Patterson, R. Rosemarie Patterson 8/20/2010 12:32:26 AM </li></ul><ul><li>To all Classmates, I have also learned a lot from this class from Prof., and all of my classmates. God Bless everyone. I learned this from training that I received from the Pacific Institute and the instructor told this story about the Wizard of Oz. Dorothy went to the wizard of oz to find a way back to Kansas and along the way she met someone that was told he did not have a brain, someone else was told that he did not have a heart, and another person was told that he did not have courage. People are told that everyday and it has become a part of their belief system (Tice, 2010). We as professionals have a duty to reach inside their minds and try to help them understand that they have a brain (they can think), they have a heart (they have feelings) and they have courage (they can overcome fear). So a lot of people are off to see the wizard because they want change in their lives. But David, we are off to BE the Wizard, the wonderful wizards of oz (Tice, 2010). We will help people find what they are looking for.  I know that this story is a child's fairy tale, but what wonderful meaning it expresses. So Classmate 1, and class with all the experience that we have acquired, education, degrees and knowledge - We are off to be the Wizard, the wonderful Wizards of Oz (Tice, 2010). God Bless Rosemarie Patterson Reference Tice, L. (2010). Steps: The guide to Employment. The Pacific Institute. Seattle </li></ul>
    35. 35. Foundations of Psychology <ul><li>Early Adulthood </li></ul><ul><li>Rosemarie Patterson </li></ul><ul><li>PSY 300 Developmental Psychology Final Project </li></ul><ul><li>Argosy University Online </li></ul>
    36. 36. Foundations of Psychology cont. 2 <ul><li>Early Adulthood </li></ul><ul><li>Ages 20 – 30 years old </li></ul><ul><li>Pierce County health department has hired the author as part of a group that will prepare eight public education programs to present to Lean On Me Community Center and Metropolitan Community Development Centers in the State of Washington. This information gathered will be used in an eight part educational program to be presented. The goal of this program is to assist the public in understanding what is needed to support the maximized physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development of early people’s development across their life cycles from infancy until death. There are eight parts of the presentation as follows: Prenatal-Birth-Infancy, Early Childhood, Middle-to-Late Childhood, Adolescence, Early Adulthood, Middle Adulthood, Late Adulthood, and Death. This part of the study will involve the Early Adulthood stages of development (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>The author will discuss the impact of the physical, cognitive and socioemotional processes as being important to the growth and development of Early Adulthood centering on the ages of 21 to 30 years old. With the assistance of counselors, friends, church, organizations, employment and daycares, the young adult has a greater advantage of successfully developing physically, cognitively and socioemotionally (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>The three objectives are listed below: </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss the impact of physical development of the Early Adulthood stage and provide recommendations for maximizing physical development (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss the impact of cognitive development and provide recommendations for maximizing cognitive development (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul>
    37. 37. Foundations of Psychology cont. 3 <ul><li>Early Adulthood </li></ul><ul><li>Ages 20 – 30 years old </li></ul><ul><li>Pierce County health department has hired the author as part of a group that will prepare eight public education programs to present to Lean On Me Community Center and Metropolitan Community Development Centers in the State of Washington. This information gathered will be used in an eight part educational program to be presented. The goal of this program is to assist the public in understanding what is needed to support the maximized physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development of early people’s development across their life cycles from infancy until death. There are eight parts of the presentation as follows: Prenatal-Birth-Infancy, Early Childhood, Middle-to-Late Childhood, Adolescence, Early Adulthood, Middle Adulthood, Late Adulthood, and Death. This part of the study will involve the Early Adulthood stages of development (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>The author will discuss the impact of the physical, cognitive and socioemotional processes as being important to the growth and development of Early Adulthood centering on the ages of 21 to 30 years old. With the assistance of counselors, friends, church, organizations, employment and daycares, the young adult has a greater advantage of successfully developing physically, cognitively and socioemotionally (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>The three objectives are listed below: </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss the impact of physical development of the Early Adulthood stage and provide recommendations for maximizing physical development (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss the impact of cognitive development and provide recommendations for maximizing cognitive development (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul>
    38. 38. Foundations of Psychology cont. 4 <ul><li>Discuss the impact of socioemotional development and provide recommendations for maximizing socioemotional development (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>The first objective, numbered 1., the author will discuss the impact of personal body and peer pressure issues actually affect the physical development of the 20 to 30 age group. Most young people reach their physical performance peak before the age of 30, and this has remained the same even though athletes as a group keep getting better and better each generation (Schultz & Curnow, 1988 as cited in Santrock, 2008). Muscle tone and strength starts to decline around the age of 30. The young adult starts showing signs of age such as protruding abdomens and double chins. The lens of the eye loses some elasticity; hearing remains constant during 20 to 30 but starts to decline during the later part of young adulthood. The mortality rate of young adults more than doubles the rate of adolescents (Park, Mulye, Adams, Brindis, & Irwin, 2006 as cited in Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>Young adults have fewer chronic health problems such as colds and respiratory problems than when they were children. Yet another physical change is that the young adult’s body fatty tissue increases (Rimsza & Kirk, 2005 as cited in Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>Since young adults have an increase in fatty tissue, then the need to diet becomes necessary. Obesity is serious and increases the risk of hypertension, diabetes and heat disease (Hahn, Payne, & Luca, 2008 as cited in Santrock, 2008). Even when diets contribute to weight loss, the rate of a person losing weight and then gaining it back increases and thus becomes a problem. This puts the young adult in danger of –yo-yo dieting and such diets care linked to gallbladder damage (Janacek, Anderson, Liu, Zheng, Yang, & Tso, 2005, as cited in Santrock, 2008). </li></ul>
    39. 39. Foundations of Psychology cont. 5 <ul><li>By the age of 25, most individuals have experienced sexual intercourse. Males have more casual sexual partners while females are more selective. Approximately 60 percent of emerging young adults limits sexual relationships to one person, while older adults in their late twenties have had intercourse with two or more individuals. This behavior with the usage of drugs and alcohol could lead to unprotected sex, transmission of diseases, rape and molestation (Lefkowitz & Gillen, 2006, as cited in Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>Another risk to the health of young adults is battling peer pressure. Young adults are subjected to use tobacco, binge drinking alcohol and using illegal drugs because of socializing around those who do. Most adults are addicted to nicotine, and would like to quit but smoking tends to calm a person and is pleasurable. (Akhter, Nishino, & Nakaya, 2007 as cited in Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>To maximize the health risks, the author recommends that more clinics provide literature and education for young adults on matters concerning sexual education, nutrition, drug and alcohol usage, and social awareness programs. Wellness programs within the community and major employers could be implemented. Doctor controlled diet; exercise such as aerobics can be housed within the local YMCA or YWCA for young adults. Rehabilitation clinics for drug users could be maintained. Smoking cessation programs and groups can be established. Local AAA groups can be formed for support within the communities. </li></ul><ul><li>The second objective, numbered 2., the author will discuss the cognitive development which impacts the Adulthood stage. The author will discuss in determining the cognitive growth from adolescent to young adult stage, the post formal operational stage, occupational development and women in the workforce (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>According to Piaget, 1955 as cited in Santrock, 2008, Stage four, which is the formal operation that begins at, age 11 through 15 in which the child’s cognitive structures are like those of an adult. Some experts argue that this stage declines in young adults. Could there be a fifth stage in which there is a post formal stage in which young adults’ way of thinking involves understanding that the correct answer to a problem could vary within different scenarios and the search for truth is a never ending process (Kitchener, King, & Deluca, 2006). </li></ul>
    40. 40. Foundations of Psychology cont. 6 <ul><li>As young adults complete high school and continue on to college occupational development is prevalent as an important goals. Usually young adults with high IQ scores go to college to become Doctors, Lawyers and Educators. Those with lower IQ participate in vocational, or technical schools (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>Jobs that require a college education will be the highest paying in the United States. These jobs include education, health services, business and professional services. More women are involved in the workforce as in these days and times it requires the two parent household to both engage in work. Now more men spend more time in household work and childcare. The work place is very diverse (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>Young adults in the work place are considered Generation X employees. These young people will not stay on one job for thirty years until retirement. These employees will change jobs and will not sacrifice their family for their job. Many have grown up as latchkey kids with divorced parents, therefore, family is more important than a job for them (Smith, G, 2009). </li></ul><ul><li>To maximize cognitive development in young adults provide occupational research, cognitive testing and occupation suitability testing for young people within the department of labor and industries. The author will provide job search training, and job counseling for young adults within the community. Job-interviewing mock up sessions will be held to prepare young </li></ul>
    41. 41. Foundations of Psychology cont. 7 <ul><li>adults for use in obtaining jobs. A monthly session will be held in which job candidates can talk openly to employers in the community. A 24-hour daycare center for working mothers and fathers will be established in the community. Parenting classes will be held in the community center or local Church. Wellness programs within the community for physical, dental, and mental health exams will be started to help working young adults stay well. A 24-hour fitness gym for working adults will be implemented. The Boys and Girls club will host parents’ night out in which young adults with children can get an evening break together away from their children for four hours at least twice a month (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>The third objective, numbered 3., the author will discuss the socioemotional development which impacts the young adulthood stage. The author will also discuss the influences and major theory, Erikson that contributes to the growth or understanding of socioemotional development in young adults (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>The author will analyze the impact that intimacy, friendships, marriage and children have on the socioemotional development of young adult. As the young adult matures according to Erikson, 1956, as cited in Santrock, 2008, the successful young adult will seek other successful persons and intimate relationships turn into marriage or long lasting friendships. There is a difference in friendships for women and men. Women share many aspects of their experiences, feelings, intimacy, and personal thoughts than men. Adult male friendships are more competitive (Wood, 2001 as cited in Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>This would contribute to the sixth stage of development called the learning intimacy versus isolation (Love). The young adult is learning to love oneself but at the same time losing oneself to another as romance enters the picture. If the young adult fails to love or find a relationship early on in young adulthood, then isolation sets in. If this happens then depression and isolation will take place. But on the other hand, if intimacy occurs early in young adulthood then marriage and parenting will follow (Erikson, 1956, as cited in Santrock, 2008). </li></ul>
    42. 42. Foundation of Psychology cont. 8 <ul><li>As the young adult continues in maturation the 7th stage of Erikson will come into play, and that is the learning generativity versus self-absorption (care). In this socioemotional development stage the young adult learns to think about others. The young adult is heading toward maturation and selflessness. This type of caring can exist within a marriage, business relationship, friendship, or as a parent (Erikson, 1956, as cited in Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>To maximize the socioemotional development of the early adulthood state, the author will provide young people organizations in which young people of the community will gather together to network and discuss issues that involve their peer group. Free marriage counseling will be provided to families upon request. Marriage and Divorce counseling will be provided through the community center. Self-development courses will be provided in the local community centers, and employment centers. Parent potlucks will be held in the local elementary schools. Parenting classes will be held in the local elementary schools. Babysitting network will be published in the local newspaper. Social workers will be readily available for parents and families that need intervention within the family. A family mentorship program will be implemented to connect struggling young adults to talk with and get guidance from a more mature family within their community (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>With the assistance of counselors, friends, church, organizations, employment and daycares, the young adult has a greater advantage of successfully developing physically, cognitively and socioemotionally (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>According to the case studies, Charles was too busy to establish an early adulthood relationship. His friends were mainly gangsters and he was under the influence of drug and </li></ul>
    43. 43. Foundation of Psychology cont. 9 <ul><li>alcohol. He learned abuse from his social relationships. He chose isolation instead of intimacy early in adulthood. When he finally found romance he was not able to provide for her because he did not get involved with college or vocational training after high school (Santrock, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>Paul, on the other hand was successful because his IQ was high and he went to the university and graduate school. He spent his time at the library and doing positive things. He had a romance early in adulthood, which progressed to Marriage. He became a successful educator. He completed Erikson’s sixth stage of development, which leads towards success in adulthood, marriage and parenting ((Erikson, 1956, as cited in Santrock, 2008). </li></ul>
    44. 44. Foundation of Psychology cont. 10 <ul><li>References </li></ul><ul><li>Santrock, J. (2008). Life-Span Development (11th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill </li></ul><ul><li>Smith, G. (2009 ). Baby boomer generation versus generation x and y. Retrieved February 7, 2009 from http:// www.chartcourse.com/articlebabyvsgenx.html </li></ul>
    45. 45. Applied Psychology <ul><li>Internship American Red Cross </li></ul><ul><li>Self-evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>By </li></ul><ul><li>Rosemarie Patterson </li></ul><ul><li>8-10-02 </li></ul>
    46. 46. Applied Psychology cont. 2 <ul><li>As I complete the final week of my practicum, I am very pleased with the outcome of my </li></ul><ul><li>experience and learning objectives. I was committed to my clients at the American Red </li></ul><ul><li>Cross, and spent endless hours meeting the needs of the families involved in a disaster. I </li></ul><ul><li>also applied my experience toward my personal life. I have a daughter who is mentally </li></ul><ul><li>disabled, and the more I worked on helping others in a crisis the better I understood what </li></ul><ul><li>the role of the case manager involved. I thought the case manager was there to provide all </li></ul><ul><li>assistance and I could sit back and rest. I found out differently. It is all starting to add up, </li></ul><ul><li>and that is from the start of the case, termination is being worked on. In relation to my </li></ul><ul><li>work at the Red Cross, the case manager's job does not end at providing emergency </li></ul><ul><li>assistance. The job involves assisting clients in becoming 100% able to help themselves. </li></ul><ul><li>Before I felt it was easier to just do everything for the client, but doing that just made it </li></ul><ul><li>easier for the client to depend upon me for all other answers. Now I assist and give </li></ul><ul><li>resources and allow the client to handle their own problems, which in turn makes the </li></ul><ul><li>recovery for the client shorter and allows them to assume responsibility for their own </li></ul><ul><li>actions. This is where I have the opportunity to use my counseling skills and techniques </li></ul><ul><li>that I have learned from my classes at Tacoma Community College. </li></ul><ul><li>According to my practicum learning objectives, I have learned to delegate work and </li></ul><ul><li>received experience in supervising other employees, and work on a major resource </li></ul><ul><li>project. My knowledge of American Red Cross is expanding. </li></ul>
    47. 47. Applied Psychology cont. 3 <ul><li>I found out that yes, I can be a case manager, and yes, I find this type of work to be </li></ul><ul><li>challenging. Case management requires dedication, and consistency. Procrastination </li></ul><ul><li>should not be part of the agenda, and I have to work on this more. </li></ul><ul><li>The easiest part of the practicum class was showing up and listening to lectures and </li></ul><ul><li>participating in discussions. I have learned that others are having difficulty in the </li></ul><ul><li>workplace and the class is a good place to discuss situations that come up in the </li></ul><ul><li>workplace. I feel that I am a very creative person and sometimes I get too creative and </li></ul><ul><li>add too much and say too much which requires me to have to do more paperwork on </li></ul><ul><li>issues. I am learning to be more concise and to the point. </li></ul><ul><li>Organization of my files was an easy task, but communication is what I need to work on. </li></ul><ul><li>I need more experience in public speaking. This will be one of my objectives next quarter </li></ul><ul><li>and also leadership and team building. </li></ul><ul><li>This was definitely a learning experience for me in supervision. I had one hostile incident </li></ul><ul><li>and my eyes were opened. I have learned it is not good to be too friendly when you are in </li></ul><ul><li>the position to supervise others on the job. It was hard to separate friendship from duty. I </li></ul><ul><li>did not want to report the incident, but by listening to my peers and supervision, I have </li></ul><ul><li>learned that it is not all about me, but it is about the company and helping other </li></ul><ul><li>employees to learn good work ethics. I plan to be the helper that will guide people </li></ul><ul><li>through the obstacles and barriers to reach their destined success. This is my profession, </li></ul><ul><li>this is my purpose, and this is my calling. </li></ul>
    48. 48. Applied Psychology cont. 4 <ul><li>CONTRACT REQUIREMENT FOR HSP 192 </li></ul><ul><li>WORK SITE COMPETENCIES (Evaluated by the Work Site Supervisor) </li></ul><ul><li>1. The student fulfills assigned role within agency, exhibits knowledge, and sensitivity to </li></ul><ul><li>Agency culture, 'and maintains accurate and appropriate records. </li></ul><ul><li>2. The Student accepts feedback and supervision in a positive and constructive </li></ul><ul><li>manner, and demonstrates ability to work with staff and clients. </li></ul><ul><li>3. The Student accepts each individual as a person, demonstrates active listening and </li></ul><ul><li>communication skills, and sets appropriate limits of interaction for self and clients. </li></ul><ul><li>4. The Student maintains appearance appropriate for the agency, displays effective </li></ul><ul><li>. work habits including punctuality, accountability, and sensitivity. </li></ul><ul><li>5. The Student agrees to abide by all federal and state laws and regulations related to </li></ul><ul><li>his/her area of Human Services. </li></ul><ul><li>6. The Student identifies appropriate resources and networks within the agency and </li></ul><ul><li>community. </li></ul><ul><li>ACADEMIC COMPETENCIES (Evaluated by the Clinical Practicum Instructor) </li></ul><ul><li>The Student learns presentation skills by presenting a case or issue for supervision in </li></ul><ul><li>weekly on-campus seminar. . </li></ul><ul><li>The Student develops and documents case management and conceptualization skills </li></ul><ul><li>by writing a case study paper as outlined in the workbook. </li></ul><ul><li>The Student improves interviewing and/or counseling skills by completing two </li></ul><ul><li>verbatim as outlined in the workbook or one verbatim and one focused professional </li></ul><ul><li>agency project. ' </li></ul><ul><li>The Student practices appropriate record keeping .skills by maintaining a calendar, </li></ul><ul><li>time sheets, and professional journal as outlined in the workbook. </li></ul><ul><li>The Student develops and reinforces self-examination skills by completing a self-evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>of their learning objectives. </li></ul>
    49. 49. Interpersonal Effectiveness <ul><li>Personal Growth </li></ul><ul><li>Rosemarie Patterson </li></ul><ul><li>PSY405 Interviewing Principles and Practices </li></ul><ul><li>Argosy University Online </li></ul><ul><li>November 11, 2008 </li></ul>
    50. 50. Interpersonal Effectiveness <ul><li>Personal Growth </li></ul><ul><li>Interviewing Techniques is an applied course designed to develop basic relationship building, interviewing techniques, reporting, and problem-solving, decision-making skills with diverse clients, with the ability of recognizing themes and patterns, and controlling barrier objectivity (Argosy University, 2007). This course focused on fundamentals and techniques that will help prepare the author for real-world applications and will serve as a foundation for development and refinement in graduate school (Argosy University, 2007). </li></ul><ul><li>Upon completion of Psychology 405 using the text, The Interviewing: Principles and Practices, the author has gained a wealth of information that could be demonstrated in daily normal and professional living. Outlined below will map the growth evolution for the author of this paper according to the weekly assignments, reports and group discussions. </li></ul><ul><li>During Week one – the author was introduced to Interviewing. The author learned the many different types of interviews including heretical and historical context (Argosy University, 2007). The author was able to introduce herself to the class and professor. She was able to meet new people through the discussion part of assignment one. This type of group discussion is great for future networking and possibility of lasting friendships. The author also learned about the five popular schools of thought regarding interviewing techniques, their believed causes, techniques and their goals (Argosy University, 2007). The author chose a career field that she would like to pursue, thus helping to build her confidence, and self-esteem in interviewing within that capacity. The author learned how to systematically prepare for a professional role that utilizes interviewing techniques by gathering information each week on the chosen occupation. </li></ul><ul><li>During week two – the author learned the importance of the different parts of the pre-interview process. The author learned how situation, context, time, scheduling, place, safety, </li></ul>
    51. 51. Interpersonal Effectiveness cont. 2 <ul><li>ill accessibility, accommodations and setting are important to the effectiveness of a successful interview (Argosy University, 2007). The author was able to demonstrate her growth through the group discussion and project assignments that were given during week two. </li></ul><ul><li>During week three – the author learned about relationships being interpersonal communication, self in relationships, verbal and nonverbal interaction how the environment impacts the interview. The author learned about empathy, feedback, diversity, goal- setting and how it corresponds with the interview and how to obtain that first initial contact with the interviewee and how to promote a good rapport between interviewer and interviewee to initiate a pleasing atmosphere (Stewart & Cash, 2008). The key contributing factors for all interviews and theoretical models are rapport and relationship (Stewart & Cash 2008). The author was able to demonstrate her ability to understand these concepts in the continuation of the project report. </li></ul><ul><li>During week four – the author learned about aspects of questioning in interviewing. The author became familiar with open and closed questions, bipolar questions, diversity and culture questioning, neutral, leading, multiple and unethical questioning (Argosy University, 2007). The author was able to recognize the different types and was able to demonstrate her competency in the assignments and the continued final project activity. The author learned the differences in obtaining a successful interview by asking appropriate questions instead of asking irrelevant and ineffective questions (Stewart & Cash, 2008). This week was quite an eye-opener for the author, because she was unfamiliar with the many facets or asking questions. She was not familiar with the above terminologies. This was a new and welcomed learning week for the author. The information was a high learning achievement for the author, in which she demonstrated her ability to experience and process new information. The information that was learned whelp the </li></ul>
    52. 52. Interpersonal Effectiveness cont. 3 <ul><li>author to avoid and be aware of question pitfalls, which can affect the success of an interview (Argosy University, 2007). </li></ul><ul><li>During week five – the author learned to structure an interview by planning it beforehand. She learned about the content of the interview, the different parts of the body, and how to effectively close it. The author learned how to plan a survey interview with a group of people. Questions were specifically structured as standardized, open-ended interview - here, the same open-ended questions are asked to all interviewees; this approach facilitates faster interviews that can be more easily analyzed and compared (McNamara, 2008). She learned what type of questions to ask and how to gather information about conducting a survey, and how to recognize culturally metaphors. This skill was demonstrated in the weekly assignment questions and the continued final course project, in which the author conducted a 30-minute interview. Within the parameters of this interview the author was able to successfully conduct an interview from beginning to end by demonstrating the learned techniques she acquired throughout the course </li></ul><ul><li>During week six – the author learned the importance of observing the interviewee for recurring themes and patterns, and how to bring awareness to the interviewee by voicing inconsistencies and discrepancies in the interviewee’s “story”. The author also learned how to draw conclusions and make interpretations and how to use education and hypothesizing to promote self-awareness in the interviewee. The exercises showed the author how to resist barriers to objectivity because of observation of the interviewee’s themes and patterns. </li></ul><ul><li>The author has learned that observation of verbal and nonverbal communication is important in understanding themes and patterns of behavior that the interviewee might have which could prevent success in an interview. </li></ul><ul><li>interpreted as being able to successfully communicate with others to gain insight and meaningful information, and with the knowledge of these principles and practices this goal can be achieved with clarity, and understanding. </li></ul>
    53. 53. Interpersonal Effectiveness cont. 4 <ul><li>During week seven – the author was able to use the information obtained in last week’s 30-minute interview and develop a report that the chosen agency could use to decide what services, if any, the interviewee would qualify for. The author chose to perform a mock employment interview. From the outcome of the interview the author was able to decide what services the interviewee would qualify for. She was able to recommend services that would enable the interviewee to continue with a real interview for two positions instead of one. The author was able to make that assessment by gathering all the information she has learned in this course. She was able to utilize her newly acquired skills to assess the qualifications of a potential employee. The author was able to ask appropriate questions without confusing the interviewee. The author was able to understand ethics: duty to warn, boundary issues, power differentials, breaches of confidentiality and employment interviewing ethics in which the author was able to demonstrate within the weekly assignment writings and the continued final project paper (Argosy University, 2007). </li></ul><ul><li>During week eight – the author learned about professional self-care, burnout, ethical dilemmas, supervision issues, personal growth and creativity. The author learned about the causes of burnout, and the importance of making time for outside activities, and the aspects of individual, peer and group supervision and how effective this could help the interviewer in times of stress, because the helping industry of helping others is stressful (Argosy University, 2007). </li></ul><ul><li>During the overall eight weeks, the author has learned that the business of helping others is quite involved. There were many concepts to understand about how to conduct an effective interview. Before this course, the author’s definition of interviewing was basically something that you do to obtain employment. Now, the author has learned that the techniques in interviewing can be used in any area of life (Stewart & Cash, 2008). To interview others can be interpreted as being able to successfully communicate with others to gain insight and meaningful information, and with the knowledge of these principles and practices this goal can be achieved with clarity, and understanding. </li></ul>
    54. 54. My Future in Learning <ul><li>Lifelong Learner </li></ul><ul><li>Rosemarie Patterson </li></ul><ul><li>Psychology 492 </li></ul><ul><li>Argosy University </li></ul>
    55. 55. Lifelong Learner cont. 2 <ul><li>I was destined from birth to become a: </li></ul><ul><li>listener </li></ul><ul><li>teacher </li></ul><ul><li>inventor </li></ul><ul><li>writer </li></ul><ul><li>peace maker </li></ul>
    56. 56. Life Long Learner cont. 3 <ul><li>Every experience that I engulf, I learn a lesson in which I store in my memory. When I come upon a situation that is difficult, I draw upon the knowledge that I have stored in my mind. I am a lifelong learner and I am willing to educate myself repeatedly grasping new concepts and models to follow. What is so good about being a lifelong learner is that no matter how old or mature I become, I still have the energy and desire to help others get to the stage of life that I embellish. </li></ul>
    57. 57. Contact Me Thank you for viewing my ePortfolio. For further information, please contact me at the e-mail address below. [email_address]

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