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The World of Agile/Lean Product Development and Delivery with Scrum Made Easy

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Agile/Lean and SCRUM based System-Software Product Development and Delivery made easy

Agile/Lean and SCRUM based System-Software Product Development and Delivery made easy

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  • But today is not about me it is about what we can learn from each other to get better at what we do
  • Notice how being…..77%78%
  • So, what is the value proposition associated with being agileThe modern world of systems-software product development and delivery presupposes we work faster and better, do more with less, change continuously, and invent new ways of working. The modern formula for work appears to be: More Success + Greater Speed + Fewer Resources + Constant Uncertainty + Increased Competition + Quicker Time to MarketBeing Agile and Lean helps us deliver value by bringing People & Technology together to Collaboratively and Adaptively develop Value-Added product increments in a Continuous Flow from Requirements to Deployment
  • So what does an agile team look like in practice.They ….
  • Fortunately or unfortunately the world of being Agile and Lean is chalk full of new vocabulary or terminology which sometimes may get in your wayIt is important that you, your team and organization come to a common understanding of the terms and vocabulary you, your team and organization use as part of being agile and lean
  • Just read slide……end withAnd your way of being agile evolves, as you inspect and adapt to change
  • “Agile” is being:Creative & ImaginativeAdaptive & Responsive – continually improving & learningCommitted - both individually and as a teamTransparentFocusedOpenRespectfulCourageous
  • Unfortunately there are barriers to being agile and lean that you should recognize and deal with effectively.Based on a survey conducted by Version One, distributed to 80 countries and the returned 2,300 responses, as depicted here, there are barriers to being agile and lean.In subsequent slides we will address some of these barriers.
  • For you today I have condensed leading change into this roadmap; notice it is broad and not prescriptive.Such a roadmap should serve you well as your north star guiding you down the path to success of collaboratively and adaptively developing and delivering commercial or operational value-added system-software iteratively and incrementally
  • ComplexityUncertaintyExperience with domain and technologyValue
  • They are both perishable over time.The result of which is the quicker requirements are consumed and delivered by the development team the greater the value delivered
  • Cone of uncertainty
  • Then based on how many story points could be consumed in one day we can determine when we would be done.So if we can consume on average 16 points per day it would take us just over 4 days to complete painting the interior of this house.
  • One technique the team can use to come up with story points is playing Planning Poke…….explain the game.Its fun and really works well.Criteria to use to come up story points:ComplexityUncertaintyExperience with domain and technologyValue
  • Our velocity =14 story points per sprintWe have 2 week sprintsIt will take us 6 weeks to develop and deliver on this product backlog
  • In this example, going from release planning to sprint planning we know based on experience our team can consume 47 story points per sprintSo we take into our sprint the top priority items that add up to 47 points.
  • Transcript

    • 1. WeBeAgile.com
    • 2. About Me  27 years of System/Software Product Development & Delivery Experience – Developer – Object Modeler – Data Modeler – Team Lead – Project Manager – Certified Scrum Master/Certified Scrum Product Owner/Certified Scrum Practitioner – Bachelor of Science/Computer Science – Master of Business Administration/MIS My Motto: "Value-added Agile/Lean product development combines leading change, practicing shared Agile values & principles, applying iterative/incremental product development and takes wisdom, passion, courage, a desire to be better and openness, especially to change" Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 2
    • 3. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 3
    • 4. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 4
    • 5. Kanban Board Pending WIP Done Story Story Story Story Story Story Define Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Build & Story Test Design Implement Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Code Story Story Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    • 6.  Overview: What it Means to be Agile and Lean  Leading Change  Agile Values & Principles  Iterative/Incremental System/Software Product Development & Delivery  SCRUM  People  Practices  Where Quality Control & Quality Assurance Fit  Preventing Defects of Intent and Defects of Implementation by:  Ensuring We are Doing the Right Things – “Fit for Purpose”  Ensuring We are Doing Things Right – “Fit for Use” Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 6
    • 7. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 7
    • 8. Results from Scott Ambler‟s February 2008 Agile Adoption Survey posted at http://www.ambysoft.com/surveys/agileFebruary2008.html Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 8
    • 9. Value = Positive Results Over Time Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 9
    • 10. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 10
    • 11. SS Agile SS Agile 11
    • 12. Copyright © 2009 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 12
    • 13. Copyright © 2009 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 13
    • 14. 1950‟s Today Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 14
    • 15. Release Sprint Sprint Planning Planning Review & Retrospective - Planning - Product Owner - Daily Standup - Scrum Master - Sprint Review - Team - Retrospective Copyright © 2009 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 15
    • 16. Source: VesionOne 2008 State of Agile Development Survey Copyright © 2008 – 2012 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 16
    • 17. Agile Leading Change Values & Principles Iterative and Incremental Scrum System/Software Product Development Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. People 17
    • 18. Transformational Challenge Re-Engineering Re-Strategizing Cultural Renewal Agile Values & Principles Leading Change Iterative and Incremental System/Software Product Scrum Development Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 18
    • 19. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 19 19
    • 20. Your Change/Action Plan Agile Values & Principles Leading Change Iterative and Incremental Scrum System/Software Product Development * Taken from Leading Change by John Kotter - 1996 Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 20
    • 21. Your Change-Action Plan (continued on next slide) 1. Establishing a sense of urgency - Identifying and discussing Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats 2. Creating the guiding coalition - Putting together a group with enough power to lead the change - Getting the group to work together as a team 3. Developing a vision and strategy - Creating a vision to help direct the change effort - Developing strategies for achieving that vision 4. Communicating the change vision - Using every vehicle possible to constantly communicate the new vision and strategies - Having the guiding coalition role model the behavior expected of employees 21 * Taken from Leading Change by John Kotter - 1996 Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    • 22. Your Change-Action Plan (continued from previous slide) 5. Empowering broad-based action - Getting rid of obstacles - Changing policies, procedures and structures that undermine the change vision - Encourage risk taking and nontraditional ideas, activities, and actions 6. Generating short-term wins - Planning for visible improvements in performance, or “wins” - Creating those wins - Visibly recognizing and rewarding people who make wins possible 7. Consolidating gains and producing more change - Using increased credibility to change all policies, procedures and structures that don‟t fit the transformation vision - Hiring, promoting, and developing people who can implement the change vision - Reinvigorating the cultural renewal with new projects, themes and change agents 8. Anchoring new approaches in the culture - Creating better performance through customer and productivity oriented behavior, more and better leadership, and more effective management - Articulating the connections between new behaviors and original success - Developing means to ensure leadership development and succession 22 Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    • 23.  Collaboratively and adaptively develop value- adding product increments in a continuous flow from requirements to deployment  Be objective and see things as a whole  Be value-driven not plan/task-driven  Identify and continually discuss individual, team and enterprise strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges  Put together a coalition to lead by example and teach  Create a vision to help direct change  Use every vehicle possible to constantly communicate the vision and strategies  Get rid of barriers to being agile  Generate short-term wins  Develop people who can implement the change  Anchor being agile in the culture Copyright © 2009 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 23
    • 24. Manifesto for Agile Software Development We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value: Individuals and interactions over processes and tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more . Leading Change Agile Values & Principles Iterative and Incremental System/Software Product Development Scrum Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 24
    • 25. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and continuous delivery of valuable software. within a development team is face-to-face conversation. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace advantage. indefinitely. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale. agility. Business people and developers must work together daily Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is throughout the project. essential. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self- environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job organizing teams. done. At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, Working software is the primary measure of progress. then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly. 25
    • 26. Agile Values & Principles Leading Change Iterative & Incremental System/Software Product Development Scrum Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 26
    • 27. What is Iterative and Incremental Development?  The definition of "iterative" is to involve repetition  Iterative Development is a development approach that "cycles" through a set of activities, from understanding requirements to incrementally produce and refine an effective solution  Iterative Development involves the successive refinement of the solution definition and implementation by the repetitive application of the core development activities to incrementally produce and refine an effective solution Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 27
    • 28. The General Pattern of Agile Development Increment of Potentially Maturity Shippable Level Product Maintain & Advance Time Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 28
    • 29. Agile Leading Change Values & Principles Iterative and Incremental Scrum System/Software Product Development Copyright © 2005 Mountain Goat Software. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 29
    • 30. Scrum Explained “The… „relay race‟ approach to product development…may conflict with the goals of maximum speed and flexibility. Instead a holistic or ‘rugby’ approach—where a team tries to go the distance as a unit, passing the ball back and forth— may better serve today’s competitive requirements.”- Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka, “The New New Product Development Game”, Harvard Business Review, January 1986 In Scrum you work in iterations delivering value-adding results incrementally Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 30
    • 31. - Planning - Product Owner - Daily Standup - Scrum Master - Sprint Review - Team - Retrospective Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 31
    • 32. Scrum Roles & Definitions (continued on next slide) Copyright © 2005 Mountain Goat Software. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 32
    • 33. Scrum Roles & Definitions (continued on next slide) Copyright © 2005 Mountain Goat Software. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 33
    • 34. Scrum Roles & Definitions (continued from previous slide) Copyright © 2005 Mountain Goat Software. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 34
    • 35. Looking at SCRUM from a Different Perspective - Planning - Product Owner - Daily Standup - Scrum Master - Sprint Review - Team - Retrospective Pivotal Progress Points Items Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 35
    • 36. User Stories Business Story Points Priority Story A 1 5 Story B 2 8 Story C 3 1 Story D 4 8 Story E 5 2 Story F 6 2 Story G 7 2 Story H 8 8 Story I 9 5 Story J 10 1 Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 36
    • 37. Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    • 38. The Product Owner/Customer tells us they want an implement for writing, drawing, or marking that is easy to keep sharp, is comfortable to hold, and when they want to they can easily make a correction. We collaborate more with the Product Owner/Customer on their needs or requirements and define the implement’s features and corresponding benefit/value, as depicted in the table below. Take notice that we have benefits that influence the implement’s functionality and constrain its design and final form. Features Benefits/Value Is made of wood Easy to sharpen and smells good Has a specific diameter Comfortable Surface to be coated Won’t get splinters Contains a lead composite filler Creates an impressive line Has an eraser at the end Makes correcting easy Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 38
    • 39. • As an implement user I want an implement that is made of wood so it is easy to sharpen and smells good when sharpening • As an implement user I want an implement that has a specific diameter so it is comfortable to hold • As an implement user I want the surface of the implement to be coated so I won’t get splinters when I use it • As an implement user I want the implement to contain a lead composite filler so I can create an impressive line • As an implement user I want to have at the end of the implement an eraser so I can easily make a correction Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 39
    • 40. A story is a “placeholder” for a requirement formulated in one or two sentences written in the everyday language of the customer or user describing desired functionality; containing just enough information so that the product team can produce a reasonable estimate of the effort to implement it Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 40
    • 41. As a Customer I want to review my order so that I can verify my address is correct Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 41
    • 42. Four factors to consider when prioritizing 1. Degree of uncertainty - the amount and significance of learning and new knowledge gained by developing the product increment 2. The amount of risk removed by developing the product increment 3. The value of having the product increment 4. The cost of developing the product increment Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 42
    • 43. Story Points: Relative Measure of the Size of a User Story  What matters are the Product Backlog relative values  The raw values we assign are unimportant  A story assigned a two should be twice as much as a story that is assigned a one; it should be two-thirds of a story that is estimated as three story points  Estimating in story points completely separates the estimation of effort from the estimation of duration 43
    • 44. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    • 45. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 45
    • 46. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 46
    • 47. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 47
    • 48. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 48
    • 49. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 49
    • 50. Project Execution Project Inception (Sprints) Product Vision Sprint Plan Stories and Backlog Review and Adapt Develop Release Plan From “Agile Project Management” Jim Highsmith Copyright 2004 Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 50
    • 51. User Stories Business Story Points Priority Story A 1 5 Story B 2 8 Story C 3 1 Story D 4 8 Story E 5 2 Story F 6 2 Story G 7 2 Story H 8 8 Story I 9 5 Story J 10 1 Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 51
    • 52. 1. Selecting Stories from the Product Backlog 2. Identifying the tasks to realize a selected Story 3. Estimating the hours required to complete the task 4. ScrumMaster validates total estimated work against total team capacity during a Sprint (# of people * productive hours/day * # of days for the Sprint) Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 52
    • 53. 1. Selecting identified tasks to complete 2. Completing them per the team's definition of done 3. This cycle repeats until all Story points for the Sprint are earned and/or Sprint is complete Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 53
    • 54. Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 54
    • 55. Team Velocity Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 55
    • 56. Velocity Chart Example 45 40 35 30 25 Velocity 20 15 10 5 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Sprint 56 Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    • 57. Burndown Chart consists of Story Points | | | | | | | | | | | S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 On a Scrum project, the team tracks its progress against a release plan by updating a release burndown chart at the end of each Sprint. The horizontal axis of the release burndown chart shows the Sprints; the vertical axis shows the amount of work remaining at the start of each Sprint in Story points. Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 57
    • 58. Burnup Chart Example 58 Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    • 59. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 59
    • 60. O P Leading Change Agile Values & Principles Iterative and Incremental System/Software Product Scrum Development A practice is a common approach for doing something with a specific purpose in mind Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 60
    • 61. Skill Role Level Depth of Persona Knowledge Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 61
    • 62. Barrier to Becoming Agile Skill Role Level Depth of Persona Knowledge Your Competency Assessment Executive Development Support Business Unit Information Services And Technology Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 62
    • 63. Motivation Motivator Factors Hygiene Factors •Achievement •Pay and Benefits •Recognition •Company Policy and Administration •Work Itself •Relationships with co-workers •Responsibility •Physical Environment •Promotion •Supervision •Growth •Status •Job Security •Salary Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 63
    • 64. Candidate Practices Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 64
    • 65. Copyright © 2008 Ivar Jacobson Consulting. Sprint/Iteration Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 65
    • 66. Copyright © 2008 Ivar Jacobson Consulting. Copyright © 2008 Ivar Jacobson Consulting. Copyright © 2008 Ivar Jacobson Consulting. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 66
    • 67. Working software & demo Unit test Code review Installer Tests Functional Performance Regression Documentation User docs/Online help Internal design docs Release notes API documents Copyright@2009 SolutionsIQ All rights Reserved Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 67
    • 68. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 68
    • 69. A Paradigm Shift How is Agile Planning Different from Traditional Approaches? A Paradigm Shift Source: www.dsdm.org Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 69
    • 70. When Being Agile, Where Does Quality Management Fit? Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 70
    • 71. Ensure We Are Doing the Right Things Copyright © 2005 Mountain Goat Software Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 71
    • 72. Ensure We Are Doing the Right Things (continued from previous page) Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 72
    • 73. Ensure We Are Doing Things Right Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 73
    • 74. Looking at the Big Picture Quality is Everyone's Responsibility Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 74
    • 75. Back-Up Slides 75
    • 76. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.

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