Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
What’s in it for you
2Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
Effectively Communicating Product Requirements
Requirements
Doing
Right
Things
Doing
Things
Right
Those who want the produ...
4Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
Roles
5
Iterative and Incremental
Project Management Framework
Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
Scr...
1. Putting the Product Owner (aka “the business” or customer representative) in the driver’s
seat – In the majority of the...
1. Putting the Product Owner (aka “the business” or customer representative) in the driver’s
seat – In the majority of the...
8Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
A iterative incremental approach to software development that seeks to maximize
business value at all times.
Manage comple...
Empirical approach to product (solution) development that
acknowledges uncertainty and manages it by frequently (iterative...
Quoted from the Manifesto for
Agile Software Development,
http://Agilemanifesto.org
Individuals and interactions over proc...
12
Paradigm Shift
Copyright © 2008 – 2012 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
13
“Iterating” builds an “Increment” of the product, verifies &
validates it, then slowly builds up quality delivering
“Va...
Continuous process improvement
14
Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
Putting requirements in
context
15
Upstream
Interface Points
Work In Process
Writing Stories
Downstream
Interface Points
...
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Agile product development for the business

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  • Let me introduce you to the Agile Manifesto…today when a project declares that it’s “Agile” or “Agile-like”, typically this is the definition that projects are referencing. This is a document created by a set of software visionaries in the winter of 2001 just outside of Salt Lake City. They didn’t get together to create it; they gathered there to discuss lightweight software development processes. They backed off that goal to discuss what they could agree upon in regards to “flexible”, “simple” software development approaches. This is what they created. People today liken it’s significance in software development to the significance given to the US declaration of independence in regards to freedom and self-determination. It has and continues to challenge old notions and provide the team’s a voice in what they can deliver.Let’s talk about this for a bit. You see the four themes in you left side, and the right side the 12 principles. Walking through the four themes…first, it’s all about people getting together, collaborating, delivering working software, in a manner that makes sense. Plenty of Agile projects have succeeded in delivering valuable working software to the customer without tools, producing only the documentation that they feel they need to create, and revising any plans whenever they need to.Now look at the 12 principles. I’m only going to bring your attention to three of them: first, number one: the highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. Remember that this was created by a committee. They argued over every single word. Read that again. On your projects, who’s the customer? The business. How do we satisfy the customer? With frequent delivery of working software that they find valuable. Next let’s look at number four: business people and technical teams need to work together every day. MIT did a study recently that found that the more time the business person spends with the technical team, the faster the rate that technical team will deliver the functionality that the business finds valuable. So, the next time the business person asks when some functionality will be delivered, they need to be asked, how much time do you have to spend with the technical team? Finally let’s look at number 7: working software is the primary measure of progress. It doesn’t say that it’s the only measure of progress, but it is the primary one. We manifest this principle by performing frequent demonstrations to the customer.
  • Agile product development for the business

    1. 1. Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    2. 2. What’s in it for you 2Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    3. 3. Effectively Communicating Product Requirements Requirements Doing Right Things Doing Things Right Those who want the product and those craftspeople who build the product must communicate effectively 3Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    4. 4. 4Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. Roles
    5. 5. 5 Iterative and Incremental Project Management Framework Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. Scrum
    6. 6. 1. Putting the Product Owner (aka “the business” or customer representative) in the driver’s seat – In the majority of the waterfall style projects the customer is involved, but in a limited capacity. They get to define a scope up-front, but then any changes they deem necessary are change ordered back to them. This practice assumes that the customer knows exactly what they want up front and penalizes them for changing their minds later in the development process. 2. Enabling the business to quickly react to changing market conditions and needs – The only thing constant in today’s economy is change. Businesses need to be able to make quick course corrections in order to survive. 3. Providing visibility into the development process – For many customers software development is a dark art. They don’t have the background in order to understand the technical details and in most cases the development team prefers it this way. The customer is left feeling helpless and Agile engages them throughout the development lifecycle, providing enhanced visibility. 6 Scrum Project Mangement Framework Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    7. 7. 1. Putting the Product Owner (aka “the business” or customer representative) in the driver’s seat – In the majority of the waterfall style projects the customer is involved, but in a limited capacity. They get to define a scope up-front, but then any changes they deem necessary are change ordered back to them. This practice assumes that the customer knows exactly what they want up front and penalizes them for changing their minds later in the development process. 2. Enabling the business to quickly react to changing market conditions and needs – The only thing constant in today’s economy is change. Businesses need to be able to make quick course corrections in order to survive. 3. Providing visibility into the development process – For many customers software development is a dark art. They don’t have the background in order to understand the technical details and in most cases the development team prefers it this way. The customer is left feeling helpless and Agile engages them throughout the development lifecycle, providing enhanced visibility. 4. Putting the Development Team in the driver’s seat - While the Product Owner is responsible for “what” is to be developed the Development Team is self-directing and self-organizing as to “how” to develop the solution-system product 7 Scrum Development Framework Doing Things Right Doing Things Right Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    8. 8. 8Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    9. 9. A iterative incremental approach to software development that seeks to maximize business value at all times. Manage complexity, unpredictability and change through Visibility, Inspection and Adaptation 9 versus Defined Process Empirical Process So what is agile? Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    10. 10. Empirical approach to product (solution) development that acknowledges uncertainty and manages it by frequently (iteratively and incrementally) delivering commercial or operation value Relying on transparency, inspection, and adaptation, with an individual and team focus on:  autonomy: the need for someone to actively participate in determining one’s own behavior, with autonomous choice of action  mastery: great skillfulness and knowledge of some subject or activity  purpose: do work that has real meaning in the world and real direction. The whole point of purpose is to give self-organization (autonomous choice of action) a proper direction Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. So what is agile? 1 1 2 3 4 5 “Iterating” builds an “Increment” of the product, verifies & validates it, then slowly builds up quality delivering “Value” incrementally
    11. 11. Quoted from the Manifesto for Agile Software Development, http://Agilemanifesto.org Individuals and interactions over processes and tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan That is, while “there is value in the items on the right”, we value the items on the left more # Principles 1 The highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. 2 Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Harness change to develop the competitive advantage. 3 Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months. 4 Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project. 5 Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done. 6 Development teams communicate frequently. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation. 7 Working software is the primary measure of progress. 8 Promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a steady pace indefinitely. 9 Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility. 10 Simplicity -- the art of maximizing the amount of work not done -- is essential. 11 The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams. 12 At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly. Values 11Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. So what is agile?
    12. 12. 12 Paradigm Shift Copyright © 2008 – 2012 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    13. 13. 13 “Iterating” builds an “Increment” of the product, verifies & validates it, then slowly builds up quality delivering “Value” incrementally Continuous product improvement Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    14. 14. Continuous process improvement 14 Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
    15. 15. Putting requirements in context 15 Upstream Interface Points Work In Process Writing Stories Downstream Interface Points  Business Process Model  Vision  Etc.  Product Backlog  Commitment – Scope, Schedule, Cost  Test Cases  Test Scripts  Training Material  Operational Documentation  Etc. Copyright © 2008 – 2013 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.

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