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WeBeAgile.com
2
Agile/Lean
Development




                Delivering early and
              often, giving ourselves
              the be...
The actualization and effectively dealing with -
             More Success + Greater Speed + Fewer Resources +
           ...
1. Selecting Stories from the
                                                            Product Backlog based on
       ...
1. Selecting identified
                                                            tasks to complete
                    ...
Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
                                                         9
SS Agile SS Agile




                    10
Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.   11
Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and The most efficient and effective method of conveying inf...
Delivering early and often,
                                                          giving ourselves the best
          ...
Conceptualize          Realize       Operationalize
                                  • Select the           •   Plan     ...
By delivering early and
often we give ourselves
the best opportunity to
beat the competition to
market, realize revenue
 a...
Scrum Explained
    “The… „relay race‟ approach to
    product development…may conflict
    with the goals of maximum spee...
Scrum Roles & Definitions
    (continued on next slide)




                                                         Copyr...
Scrum Roles & Definitions
    (continued on next slide)




                                                         Copyr...
Scrum Roles & Definitions
    (continued from previous slide)




                                                        ...
Problem /                                                  Feedback
Opportunity


                                        ...
Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.   21
Kanban Board
               Pending                                                      WIP                              ...
Candidate Practices




                      23
Usage scenario
  – When a project team wants to “be” agile they
    self-organize & self-direct around the 9 practices
  –...
The actualization and effectively dealing with -
             More Success + Greater Speed + Fewer Resources +
           ...
Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
User Stories               Business    Story Points
                                                         Priority
    ...
Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.   29
The Product Owner/Customer tells us they want an implement for writing,
    drawing, or marking that is easy to keep sharp...
• As an implement user I want an implement that is made of
    wood so it is easy to sharpen and smells good when
    shar...
A story is a “placeholder”
                                   for a requirement formulated as a
                          ...
Samples Stories

                              As a vacation planner, I
                              want to see photos o...
Where Are the Details?
As a user, I can cancel a reservation
  Does the user get a full or partial refund?
      Is the r...
Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.   35
Details as Conditions-of-Satisfaction
The product owner‟s conditions of satisfaction
 can be added to a story
    These a...
Another Example of Details as Conditions-of-Satisfaction
Story - As an eligible user, I can pay the one-time registration ...
INVESTing in Good Stories
Independent
   - Dependencies lead to problems estimating and prioritizing
   - Can ideally sele...
Sometimes You
                                                                                Have to See the
            ...
Five factors to consider when prioritizing
     1.The commercial or operational value of having the story
     2.Degree of...
User Stories               Business    Story Points
                                                         Priority
    ...
Story Points: Relative Measure of the
Size of a Story




                                        42
1. Selecting Stories from the
                                                            Product Backlog based on
       ...
1. Selecting identified
                                                            tasks to complete
                    ...
Roadmap to “being” agile

 Collaboratively and adaptively develop value-
  adding product increments in a continuous flow...
Agile Business Driven Development
Agile Business Driven Development
Agile Business Driven Development
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Agile Business Driven Development

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Business Analysis & Business Analyst Role
in the World of “Being” Agile

Published in: Technology, Business

Transcript of "Agile Business Driven Development"

  1. 1. WeBeAgile.com
  2. 2. 2
  3. 3. Agile/Lean Development Delivering early and often, giving ourselves the best opportunity to beat the competition to market, realize revenue and discover insights that we can use to help us improve 5
  4. 4. The actualization and effectively dealing with - More Success + Greater Speed + Fewer Resources + Constant Uncertainty + Increased Competition + Quicker Time to Market 1. Agile puts the Product Owner (aka “the business” or customer representative) in the driver’s seat – In the majority of the waterfall style projects the customer is involved, but in a limited capacity. They get to define a scope up-front, but then any changes they deem necessary are change ordered back to them. This practice assumes that the customer knows exactly what they want up front and penalizes them for changing their minds later in the development process. 2. Agile allows the business to quickly react to changing market conditions and needs – The only thing constant in today‟s economy is change. Businesses need to be able to make quick course corrections in order to survive. 3. Agile provides visibility into the development process – For many customers software development is a dark art. They don‟t have the background in order to understand the technical details and in most cases the development team prefers it this way. The customer is left feeling helpless and Agile engages them throughout the development lifecycle, providing enhanced visibility. 4. Agile also puts the Development Team in the driver’s seat - While the Product Owner is responsible for “what” is to be developed the Development Team is self-directing and self-organizing as to “how” to develop the system-software product
  5. 5. 1. Selecting Stories from the Product Backlog based on the team’s velocity 2. Identifying the tasks to realize a selected Story 3. Estimating the hours required to complete the task 4. ScrumMaster validates total estimated work against total team capacity during a Sprint (# of people * productive hours/day * # of days for the Sprint) Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 7
  6. 6. 1. Selecting identified tasks to complete 2. Completing them per the team's definition of done 3. This cycle repeats until all Story points for the Sprint are earned and/or Sprint is complete Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 8
  7. 7. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 9
  8. 8. SS Agile SS Agile 10
  9. 9. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 11
  10. 10. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and continuous delivery of valuable software. within a development team is face-to-face conversation. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace advantage. indefinitely. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale. agility. Business people and developers must work together daily Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is throughout the project. essential. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self- environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job organizing teams. done. At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, Working software is the primary measure of progress. then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly. 12
  11. 11. Delivering early and often, giving ourselves the best opportunity to beat the competition to market, realize revenue and discover insights that we can use to help us improve Copyright © 2009 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 13
  12. 12. Conceptualize Realize Operationalize • Select the • Plan • Deployment Customer • Test • Servicing • Understand the • Develop Customer • Deliver • Express Feature • Inspect Set • Adapt Copyright © 2009 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 14
  13. 13. By delivering early and often we give ourselves the best opportunity to beat the competition to market, realize revenue and discover insights that we can use to help us improve
  14. 14. Scrum Explained “The… „relay race‟ approach to product development…may conflict with the goals of maximum speed and flexibility. Instead a holistic or ‘rugby’ approach—where a team tries to go the distance as a unit, passing the ball back and forth— may better serve today’s competitive requirements.”- Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka, “The New New Product Development Game”, Harvard Business Review, January 1986 In Scrum you work in iterations delivering value-adding results incrementally Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 16
  15. 15. Scrum Roles & Definitions (continued on next slide) Copyright © 2005 Mountain Goat Software. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 17
  16. 16. Scrum Roles & Definitions (continued on next slide) Copyright © 2005 Mountain Goat Software. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 18
  17. 17. Scrum Roles & Definitions (continued from previous slide) Copyright © 2005 Mountain Goat Software. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 19
  18. 18. Problem / Feedback Opportunity Traditional Development All  implied sequential “waterfall”  time delay in obtaining feedback Planning All Requirements All Design All Development All Validation All Implementation Iterative & Incremental Development and Delivery US Airways Confidential – Do not distribute or duplicate
  19. 19. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 21
  20. 20. Kanban Board Pending WIP Done Story Story Story Story Story Story Define Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Build & Story Test Design Implement Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Code Story Story Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
  21. 21. Candidate Practices 23
  22. 22. Usage scenario – When a project team wants to “be” agile they self-organize & self-direct around the 9 practices – The team then selects 1 or more practice to apply to their work at hand Benefits – Iterative & Incremental adoption of “being” agile – Gives team a context and narrow focus to rally around – Provides a non-threatening easy way for team to learn together, “be” agile, apply an iterative and incremental approach, and get better at what we do 24
  23. 23. The actualization and effectively dealing with - More Success + Greater Speed + Fewer Resources + Constant Uncertainty + Increased Competition + Quicker Time to Market 1. Agile puts the Product Owner (aka “the business” or customer representative) in the driver’s seat – In the majority of the waterfall style projects the customer is involved, but in a limited capacity. They get to define a scope up-front, but then any changes they deem necessary are change ordered back to them. This practice assumes that the customer knows exactly what they want up front and penalizes them for changing their minds later in the development process. 2. Agile allows the business to quickly react to changing market conditions and needs – The only thing constant in today‟s economy is change. Businesses need to be able to make quick course corrections in order to survive. 3. Agile provides visibility into the development process – For many customers software development is a dark art. They don‟t have the background in order to understand the technical details and in most cases the development team prefers it this way. The customer is left feeling helpless and Agile engages them throughout the development lifecycle, providing enhanced visibility. 4. Agile also puts the Development Team in the driver’s seat - While the Product Owner is responsible for “what” is to be developed the Development Team is self-directing and self-organizing as to “how” to develop the system-software product
  24. 24. Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
  25. 25. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
  26. 26. User Stories Business Story Points Priority Story A 1 5 Story B 2 8 Story C 3 1 Story D 4 8 Story E 5 2 Story F 6 2 Story G 7 2 Story H 8 8 Story I 9 5 Story J 10 1 Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 28
  27. 27. Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 29
  28. 28. The Product Owner/Customer tells us they want an implement for writing, drawing, or marking that is easy to keep sharp, is comfortable to hold, and when they want to they can easily make a correction. We collaborate more with the Product Owner/Customer on their needs or requirements and define the implement’s features and corresponding benefit/value, as depicted in the table below. Take notice that we have benefits that influence the implement’s functionality and constrain its design and final form. Features Benefits/Value Is made of wood Easy to sharpen and smells good Has a specific diameter Comfortable Surface to be coated Won’t get splinters Contains a lead composite filler Creates an impressive line Has an eraser at the end Makes correcting easy Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 30
  29. 29. • As an implement user I want an implement that is made of wood so it is easy to sharpen and smells good when sharpening • As an implement user I want an implement that has a specific diameter so it is comfortable to hold • As an implement user I want the surface of the implement to be coated so I won’t get splinters when I use it • As an implement user I want the implement to contain a lead composite filler so I can create an impressive line • As an implement user I want to have at the end of the implement an eraser so I can easily make a correction Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 31
  30. 30. A story is a “placeholder” for a requirement formulated as a brief description written in the everyday language of the customer or user describing desired functionality; containing just enough information so that the product team can produce a reasonable estimate of the effort to implement it Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 32
  31. 31. Samples Stories As a vacation planner, I want to see photos of the hotels to help me determine if it meets my needs As a user, I want to cancel As a frequent flier, I want a reservation to rebook a past trip, so that I save time booking trips I take often 33
  32. 32. Where Are the Details? As a user, I can cancel a reservation Does the user get a full or partial refund? Is the refund to her credit card or is it site credit? How far ahead must the reservation be cancelled? Is that the same for all hotels? For all site visitors? Can frequent travelers cancel later? Is a confirmation provided to the user? How? 34
  33. 33. Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 35
  34. 34. Details as Conditions-of-Satisfaction The product owner‟s conditions of satisfaction can be added to a story  These are essentially acceptance tests As a user, I can cancel a Verify that a premium member reservation can cancel the same day without a fee. Verify that a non-premium member is charged 10% for a same- day cancellation. Continued next page Verify that an email confirmation is sent. Verify that the hotel is notified of any cancellation. 36
  35. 35. Another Example of Details as Conditions-of-Satisfaction Story - As an eligible user, I can pay the one-time registration fee of $10, so that I can access my driver’s record in the future Conditions-of Satisfaction: • verify that a payment can be made • verify that once a payment is made, the user can view their record (with any subsequent fees) • verify that payment option is not available if registration has already been paid Story - As an eligible user, I can create a unique user name and password so that my access is limited to my record and to track activity and payment Conditions-of Satisfaction: • verify that a user account can be created • verify that a user name that is already in use (assigned) is not accepted and the user notified then prompted for a different user name • verify that the user name conforms to naming convention (length, caps, etc.) • verify that the password conforms to naming convention (length, caps, symbols, etc.) • verify that the legal compliance conditions and consequences of use are displayed and accepted • verify that if the user does not accept the legal compliance conditions and consequences than no user name is created Story - As an eligible user, I can access my record, so that I can verify that it is correct Conditions-of Satisfaction: • verify that the user‟s record is displayed • verify that the user cannot access records other than his/her own (or dependents) • verify that user is charged $10 for the first access and $5 for subsequent accesses. • verify that the user is limited to three record access each year. • verify that the system displays user profile information including: names, addresses, email addresses, credit cards, and PayPal. • verify that records for any nonresident individual with a driving record in the state can be accessed 37 (by March 1)
  36. 36. INVESTing in Good Stories Independent - Dependencies lead to problems estimating and prioritizing - Can ideally select a story to work on without pulling in 18 other stories Negotiable - Stories are not contracts - Leave or imply some flexibility Valuable - To users or customers, not developers - Rewrite developer stories to reflect value to users or customers Estimatable - Because plans are based on user stories, we need to be able to estimate them Sized appropriately - Complex stories are intrinsically large - Compound stories are multiple stories in one Testable - Stories need to be testable Bill Wake, xp123.com 38
  37. 37. Sometimes You Have to See the Big Picture Optional to Know How the Optional Pieces Fit Best Together Optional Optional Bus Strategy Use Cases Business Model System Requirements Functional & Non-Functional Solution/IT-Services Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 39
  38. 38. Five factors to consider when prioritizing 1.The commercial or operational value of having the story 2.Degree of uncertainty - the amount and significance of learning and new knowledge gained by developing the story; focused on requirements and technology 3.The amount of risk removed by developing and delivering the story – focused on schedule, budget, scope, operation, technology 4.Dependencies – stories that must be developed together and are delivered together to provide value to the customer 5.The cost of developing and delivering the story Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 40
  39. 39. User Stories Business Story Points Priority Story A 1 5 Story B 2 8 Story C 3 1 Story D 4 8 Story E 5 2 Story F 6 2 Story G 7 2 Story H 8 8 Story I 9 5 Story J 10 1 Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 41
  40. 40. Story Points: Relative Measure of the Size of a Story 42
  41. 41. 1. Selecting Stories from the Product Backlog based on the team’s velocity 2. Identifying the tasks to realize a selected Story 3. Estimating the hours required to complete the task 4. ScrumMaster validates total estimated work against total team capacity during a Sprint (# of people * productive hours/day * # of days for the Sprint) Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 43
  42. 42. 1. Selecting identified tasks to complete 2. Completing them per the team's definition of done 3. This cycle repeats until all Story points for the Sprint are earned and/or Sprint is complete Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 44
  43. 43. Roadmap to “being” agile  Collaboratively and adaptively develop value- adding product increments in a continuous flow from requirements to deployment Agile  Be objective and see things as a whole Coaching & Training  Be value-driven not plan/task-driven  Identify and continually discuss individual, team and enterprise strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges Agile Scrum Cultural Transition Coaching &  Put together a coalition to lead by example and Renewal Training Program teach  Create a vision to help direct change  Use every vehicle possible to constantly communicate the vision and strategies Organizational Change Management  Get rid of barriers to being agile  Generate short-term wins  Develop people who can implement the change  Anchor being agile in the culture 46
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