Presentacion armstrong

357 views
304 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
357
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
19
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Presentacion armstrong

  1. 1. WHAT A WONDERFUL MAN OF THE WORLD:a praiseto LOUIS ARMSTRONG<br />
  2. 2. Place Jazz<br />in thecontext of African-American<br />music in general<br />Place the individual jazzman<br />intothecontext of Jazz<br />
  3. 3. Analogy<br />Tensionbetweenfreedom and social order<br />in theircomittedgroups and publiclife<br />The musictheyperform -> jazz<br />Freedomforsoloistsbutappear at theirbest<br />in thecompany of theirgroups<br />
  4. 4. WhenApproachingLegends as<br />-> Charlie Parker <-<br />-> Coltrane <-<br />-> Miles Davis <-<br />-> Armstrong himself <-<br />Be cautiousabout individual gifts<br />
  5. 5. Notionfound in many Histories of Jazz<br />The verynature of Jazz performance<br />makesevident<br />performersdependononeanother<br />in everythingthey do<br />
  6. 6. The Hot Five<br />FromLefttoRight: Louis Armstrong, Johnny St. Cyr, Johnny Dodds, KidOry and LilHardin Armstrong.<br />
  7. 7. EarlyYears of Jazz<br />withspecialreferencetothe<br />life and work of Louis Armstrong<br />
  8. 8. Stupendous Cultural Achievements<br />From<br />U. S. Slaves<br />GenerationafterGeneration<br />
  9. 9. Kidnapped, Middlepassage, Slavery<br />Dispossessed of material and immaterialthings:<br />thesupport of king<br />The respect & status withinthegroup<br />Stablefamilylife<br />Deferenceduetotheold<br />
  10. 10.
  11. 11. Factors of Slavery<br />Nothingtowaitforbut<br />A lifetime of labour<br />& <br />Physical and continuouspunishment<br />
  12. 12. Tool of survival<br />
  13. 13. Learnsomethingaboutsurvival<br />Their use of musictomakesense of anotherwise<br />senselesssituation<br />
  14. 14. Identity<br />Knowledge -> whothey are<br /> -> whathavebeen done tothem<br />Contrast -> thatiswho (“what”) you are<br /> -> lessthanfullyhuman<br />
  15. 15. Around 1800 byunknownartist<br />Aroundslaves, dancingbecame a physicalresistance test<br />
  16. 16. Learning bits & pieces<br />In plantations<br />From<br />Europeanculture<br />The houses of theirMasters<br />And<br />Churches<br />
  17. 17. The Great Awakening<br />Black slavessingingtheir spirituals<br />combine certainty of heaven<br />withthe hope of freedom in thisworld<br />
  18. 18. Whateveritiswe are doingwe are doingittogether<br />
  19. 19. Black slavessingingtheir spirituals<br />combine certainty of heaven<br />withthe hope of freedom in thisworld<br />
  20. 20. Linguistssaythereis no suchthing as a primitivelanguage<br />In thesameway no music can beconsideredprimitive<br />
  21. 21. Black Diaspora + White music<br />Absortion of European musical traditions<br />Attraction and Repulsion<br />BetweenEuropean and Africanvalues<br />Metaphor<br />
  22. 22. Black peopleefficient and imaginativewiththespokenword<br />Tensionbetween Western Euro-American + African-American music<br />Improvisation versus notation<br />
  23. 23. New Orleans<br />The Blackest of Black<br />The Whitest of White<br />
  24. 24. New Orleans<br />Crystallization of a new style<br />
  25. 25. Spanish & FrenchoriginsWealth & corruptionCosmopolitismDevotiontopleasure<br />Contrast -> puritanism<br />
  26. 26. Place Congo<br />Dancingthebamboula in the Place Congo<br />
  27. 27. At Place Congo<br />Slaveswouldfreely do theirmusic and dance<br />
  28. 28. New Orleans<br />Class of Creole Blacks<br />Everyculturecontributessomethingtothecreation of thisstyle<br />
  29. 29. New Orleans<br />Children of wealthywhitemasters and theircoloredmistresses<br />Educated in EuropeanCulture<br />Consideredthemselves as white<br />
  30. 30. New Orleans<br />Afteroppressivelegislation of 1894<br />Reclassified as Black<br />ForcedtoplaywithBlacks<br />
  31. 31. New Orleans<br />Rightcombinationtocreate a flexible abilitytoplaybothstyles<br />
  32. 32. New Orleans<br /> The result of creole musicians (europeanstyle) intorougheratmospheres (heldtogetherby a minimumwritten material)<br />Musicianswiththeabilitytoplaybothstyles; skilled in reading and writingmusic<br />
  33. 33. New Orleans<br /> CREOLE TEACHERS WITH EUROPEAN STYLE<br />Something of that training wasfosteringspecialabilitiesinto new musicians<br />-> Armstrong<br />
  34. 34. New Styles<br />Blues, ragtime, …<br />1917 - > firstrecording of jazz <br />
  35. 35. EarlyYears of Jazz<br />1917 - > firstrecording of jazz music<br />
  36. 36. Playerscould improvise faithfultothecommunity<br />Dueregardtooveralleffect<br />Mutual humancare<br />Satisfaction of the (dancingaudience)<br />
  37. 37. Louis Armstrong<br />Earlylifedeprivedmaterially and emotionally<br />
  38. 38. Playshismusic<br />In bands, mississippiboats,<br />
  39. 39. He himselfplayedforpenniesonstreetcorners<br />1913 -> Arrested (Coloredwaif home)learntToplaythecornet<br />
  40. 40. 1922 - > King oliversentforhim and armstrongwentto chicago (a sensation)<br />
  41. 41. Ownedtheseskills: Slowvibratto, cadences, melodicinventiveness<br />1924 -> aftermarryinglilLIANhardIn (classicallytrained) shehelpshim in hiscareersummary<br />
  42. 42. keywords<br />HistoricalHardship<br />Affirmativeaction<br />Steorotypethreat<br />U.S. Slave Descendants<br />Racism<br />Segregation<br />UndervaluedbyOfficialCulture<br />Theirvaluesdisputed and contested<br />Consideredprimitives<br />Survival<br />Orality<br />Identity<br />Comittedgroup<br />Complex web of humanrelations<br />Black ExpressingCulture<br />Politicalaction (music)<br />Humanright: thepowerto define oneself<br />
  43. 43. West end blues solo<br />Louis Armstrong<br />

×