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Quinones
Quinones
Quinones
Quinones
Quinones
Quinones
Quinones
Quinones
Quinones
Quinones
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Quinones

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  • 1. ALCOHOL AND DRUG ADDICTION I S A D D I C T I O N R U N N I N G Y O U R L I F E
  • 2. The modern day perspective asserts that addiction is primarily a psychological and physiological disorder. There are psychological triggers, circumstances, and patterns of behavior that initiate and re-enforce addictive behavior as well as physiological correlates of addiction that further compel it. For example, alcoholism is seen as triggered by a variety of identifiable psychological circumstances sustained by physiological dependence. The approach to treatment is multi-modal addressing both its psychological and biological aspects. Twelve Steps programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous, currently the mainstay of treatment for addictive disorders, have expanded this perspective by emphasizing the role of spirituality. Because of its success in assisting with addiction it is important to carefully examine the original spiritual vision and intent of AA. This undertaking will point us in the direction of a very different understanding of this disorder. Addiction,Meditation,and Contemplative Practice
  • 3. PICTURE
  • 4. DEFINITION OF A DRUG AND DRUG USE A drug is defined as any substance that can alter the homeostasis of the body. Individuals consuming these substances can be described as using, misusing, or abusing drugs or any other substances. Drug Misuse-Drug misuse is use of a drug that may result in transient physical, mental, or social problems. Drinking alcoholic beverages or smoking marijuana for improved social skills would be drug misuse. Giving a prescription to a friend or family member because he or she has the same symptoms as you do, or taking more of a medication and at more frequent intervals than prescribed, would also be considered drug misuse. Drug and drug Abuse
  • 5. Dual Diagnosis: Information and Treatment for Co-occurring Disorders A dual diagnosis is given to an individual who has both a mental disorder and an alcohol or drug problem. These conditions occur together frequently. Trying to manage just one of these problems can be extremely stressful. To complicate things further, add to the mix multiple symptoms that overlap and mask the ability to make a diagnosis, and what you are left with is a difficult and complex challenge to find a successful treatment. To achieve the best possible outcome, both disorders must be treated simultaneously because the cumulative effect influences all aspects of the individual’s life and greatly increases their risk for relapse. The relationship between mental illness and substance abuse Dual Diagnosis Rehabilitation
  • 6. Family History of Alcoholism May Predict Adult Alcohol-Use Disorders Most young adults grow out of the heavy drinking typical of their college years, but children from families with a high level of alcoholism are more likely to continue drinking heavily and develop alcohol-use disorders (AUD) even after they graduate, Health Day News reported June 4. Researcher Christy Capone of Brown University's Centre for Alcohol and Addiction Studies and colleagues compared drinking rates of college-age adults to the density of family history of alcoholism (FHA) -- the number of alcoholics in their whole family, not just a mother or father. ndividuals whose first- or second-degree relatives had a history of alcoholism were at greater risk of drinking problems themselves, and researchers said many of these cases would have been missed if researchers had only looked at immediate family history of alcoholism. Family and Alcohol News
  • 7. Family and Alcohol
  • 8. Kinds of Drugs and alcohol
  • 9. What is addiction? The term "addiction" refers to a strong dependence or habitual use of a substance or practice, despite the negative consequences of its use. This may refer to substance addictions, (e.g. alcohol, illicit or prescription drugs) or behavioural addictions, (e.g. work, food, sex, gambling, relationships, computers, pornography, cutting etc.). An addiction may be harmful to a person's mental, physical and spiritual health, their connections with family and friends, their work life and economic functioning. How does The Bay view addiction? The Bay Approach™ sees destructive patterns of thought and behaviour, such as chemical and other dependencies, as an individual's changeable creative adaptation for survival in the face of life events. Rather than seeing them as embedded for life, The Bay holds the view that these adaptations can change. Questions to Ask

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