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Faculty Development
Creative Teaching and Learning Strategies

Lisa M. Sullivan
Associate Dean for Education
Professor and...
Learning Objectives
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Promote active learning
 Match student and faculty exp...
Outline
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Course content - what needs to be covered
(why? how?)
 Changing la...
Course Content
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Link to desired outcomes
 Relate to mission, vision for Sch...
Changing Landscape - Students
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Age of incoming students decreasing (slowly)
...
Definitions
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

Generation
GI Generation
Silent generation
Baby Boomers
Generatio...
Our Schools
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

Faculty

Students

Boomers

Gen X

Gen Y

Boston University Schoo...
Backdrop
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Life experiences impact the
way people learn
 Challenge for facul...
Generation X
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 “Latchkey” kids – both parents working
 Many from single pare...
Generation X
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Independent, problem solvers
 Ambitious, self-starters
 Want...
Generation Y
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Largest generation since baby boomers

 Many from divorced, s...
Generation Y
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here









Self-confident, entitled
Ambitious with high expe...
Mixed Classrooms
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

Older Students

Younger Students

Benefits

Experienced

Tec...
Our Students
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here








Surfers and scanners – not readers and digesters
Ex...
Our Faculty
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Healthiest and wealthiest of generations to
date
 Redefine tra...
How Faculty Spend In-Class Time
Other
15%

Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

Student
Group Work
15%

Student
In...
Lecturing
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Research has shown that it is impossible for
students to absorb a...
Student’s Expectations
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Want solid knowledge base and real-world
application...
Faculty’s Challenges
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Time
 Keeping up with their field
 Dealing with stud...
Strategies
 We must understand learners
 Accept differences among students and between
students and faculty
 Engage stu...
Strategies
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Problem-based learning
 Student-centered instruction
(Adult lea...
Student-Centered Learning
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Substitute active learning projects and
experienc...
Student Challenges
 Students feel that teachers have changed the
rules
 Teachers not teaching
 Paying tuition for what?...
Faculty Challenges
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here







Fear – stop lecturing & lose control
Won’t cove...
Competencies
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Defined by the needs of the workforce and are
the essential kn...
Competencies
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Each competency is supported by multiple
learning objectives.
...
Competencies
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

Input from
employers, alumni,
faculty, staff
and students

Compe...
Getting from Here to There….
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

Students
Learn best when outcomes are clear and ...
Course Design
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Define competencies
 Map the learning objectives that suppor...
Teaching Strategies
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here






Set context
Tie topics together continually
Pre-...
Be Flexible
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Check-in
 Are students learning?
 How do you know?
 What cou...
Summary
Can’t satisfy everyone so mix it up!
Teach to the top
Use student-centered approaches
Use effective technology (au...
Strategies
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 Use different methods
 In-class
 Outside of class (must link t...
Set The Tone






Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

Create an environment that supports learning
Encourag...
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

Biostatistical skills
are in demand

Boston University School of Public Healt...
Important Questions
Make Connections
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 What are the causes, prevention
and tr...
Discussion Points
Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

 What are your biggest challenges in teaching?
 Do you ha...
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Transcript of "Creative teaching-and-learning-strategies"

  1. 1. Faculty Development Creative Teaching and Learning Strategies Lisa M. Sullivan Associate Dean for Education Professor and Chair, Department of Biostatistics Boston University School of Public Health Boston University School of Public Health
  2. 2. Learning Objectives Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Promote active learning  Match student and faculty expectations  Stimulate learning in trainees Boston University School of Public Health
  3. 3. Outline Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Course content - what needs to be covered (why? how?)  Changing landscape  Competencies (Outcomes)  Making the connection (mapping)  Some suggestions Boston University School of Public Health
  4. 4. Course Content Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Link to desired outcomes  Relate to mission, vision for School, Program, Course  Ideally - defined by the needs of the workforce Boston University School of Public Health
  5. 5. Changing Landscape - Students Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Age of incoming students decreasing (slowly)  Faculty aging  Economic and other pressures  Value of education  Encourage changes in careers later in life Varied classrooms Boston University School of Public Health
  6. 6. Definitions Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here Generation GI Generation Silent generation Baby Boomers Generation X Millennials or Generation Y Boston University School of Public Health Years Born 1900-1924 1925-1945 1946-1964 1965-1979 1980-2000 Age Today 85-109 64-84 45-63 30-44 9-29
  7. 7. Our Schools Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here Faculty Students Boomers Gen X Gen Y Boston University School of Public Health
  8. 8. Backdrop Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Life experiences impact the way people learn  Challenge for faculty to be effective in teaching and to make teaching and learning relevant Boston University School of Public Health
  9. 9. Generation X Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  “Latchkey” kids – both parents working  Many from single parent homes  Technologically savvy  Grew up with corporate downsizing and layoffs, fewer career opportunities Boston University School of Public Health
  10. 10. Generation X Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Independent, problem solvers  Ambitious, self-starters  Want support but do not want to be told what to do or how to do it  Expect instant gratification, immediate feedback  Know they must keep learning to be marketable Boston University School of Public Health
  11. 11. Generation Y Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Largest generation since baby boomers  Many from divorced, single parent homes but parents are extremely hands-on (“decade of the child”)  Overindulged, overprotected, self-absorbed  Technologically savvy Boston University School of Public Health
  12. 12. Generation Y Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here        Self-confident, entitled Ambitious with high expectations Want to know process, rules, how to get ahead Expect to start at the top Want constant and immediate feedback Move quickly from one thing to another Not as independent as Gen X (parental back-up) Boston University School of Public Health
  13. 13. Mixed Classrooms Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here Older Students Younger Students Benefits Experienced Technologically Savvy Challenges Anxious Lack Identity Mixed classroom closer to work environment Boston University School of Public Health
  14. 14. Our Students Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here       Surfers and scanners – not readers and digesters Expect constant and immediate feedback Want directness over subtlety Technologically savvy but crave personal contact Always hurried – know what they want Want to learn Boston University School of Public Health
  15. 15. Our Faculty Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Healthiest and wealthiest of generations to date  Redefine traditional values  Hard-working  Passionate (can change the world)  Believe in hierarchy – may find it difficult to adapt to more flexible arrangements Boston University School of Public Health
  16. 16. How Faculty Spend In-Class Time Other 15% Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here Student Group Work 15% Student Independent Work 10% Boston University School of Public Health Lecturing 60% What do students retain?
  17. 17. Lecturing Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Research has shown that it is impossible for students to absorb all of the information in a lecture (limited short term memory)  We need every student to learn – not just a few  More effective approach – get students actively thinking and learning Boston University School of Public Health
  18. 18. Student’s Expectations Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Want solid knowledge base and real-world applications  Want clear and organized presentation of material  Want to be stimulated, active and participatory  Want to know why (how does this activity, reading connect to my future career?)  Want faculty to be enthusiastic, helpful and engaged  Expect “customer service”  Want face-to-face contact but accept boundaries Boston University School of Public Health
  19. 19. Faculty’s Challenges Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Time  Keeping up with their field  Dealing with students with varied backgrounds and skill levels Boston University School of Public Health
  20. 20. Strategies  We must understand learners  Accept differences among students and between students and faculty  Engage students in setting goals and expectations  Be flexible, creative and try not to be surprised by anything that happens in the classroom! Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here Boston University School of Public Health
  21. 21. Strategies Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Problem-based learning  Student-centered instruction (Adult learning/Adult education)  Competency-based (outcomes-based) instruction Boston University School of Public Health
  22. 22. Student-Centered Learning Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Substitute active learning projects and experiences for lectures  Hold students responsible for material not yet covered  Assign open-ended questions and problems  Use simulations, role-playing  Use self-paced or cooperative (team) learning Boston University School of Public Health
  23. 23. Student Challenges  Students feel that teachers have changed the rules  Teachers not teaching  Paying tuition for what?  Team based learning - some do not want to work in groups  Do all members contribute equally?  Too difficult to schedule, coordinate  Some dominate, others hide Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here Boston University School of Public Health
  24. 24. Faculty Challenges Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here      Fear – stop lecturing & lose control Won’t cover all of the material Will students do the work? Fair assessment of group and team work Repercussions of student dissatisfaction (lower ratings, etc) Boston University School of Public Health
  25. 25. Competencies Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Defined by the needs of the workforce and are the essential knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSA’s) required to achieve an acceptable level of performance  Achieved through formal training in the classroom and through hands-on field work (e.g., capstone experience, practicum) Boston University School of Public Health
  26. 26. Competencies Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Each competency is supported by multiple learning objectives.  Learning objectives for the core competencies generally fall in lower-middle cognitive domains of Bloom’s Taxonomy (knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis)  Concentration-specific and cross-cutting (or interdisciplinary) objectives are more complex and include synthesis and evaluation Boston University School of Public Health
  27. 27. Competencies Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here Input from employers, alumni, faculty, staff and students Competencies Learning Objectives Learning Activities Boston University School of Public Health
  28. 28. Getting from Here to There…. Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here Students Learn best when outcomes are clear and integrated into relevant context Need practical - not hypothetical - experiences Competencies Increase relevance and accountability in curricula Challenges Too many competencies Levels vary Assessment Boston University School of Public Health
  29. 29. Course Design Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Define competencies  Map the learning objectives that support each competency  Determine activities and assessments that promote student learning that are authentic (i.e., scenarios reflecting what students would actually do in practice) and that are feasible to administer Boston University School of Public Health
  30. 30. Teaching Strategies Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here     Set context Tie topics together continually Pre-assignments In class lectures and activities  Opportunity to practice – with feedback  Audience response system “clickers”  Short but realistic examples  Assessments Boston University School of Public Health
  31. 31. Be Flexible Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Check-in  Are students learning?  How do you know?  What could be improved? Boston University School of Public Health
  32. 32. Summary Can’t satisfy everyone so mix it up! Teach to the top Use student-centered approaches Use effective technology (audience response, real examples)  Consider team work, peer-to-peer exchange  Stay connected     Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here Boston University School of Public Health
  33. 33. Strategies Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  Use different methods  In-class  Outside of class (must link to course objectives)  Encourage critical thinking and synthesis  Create opportunities for reflection  Pre-class “assignments” Boston University School of Public Health
  34. 34. Set The Tone      Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here Create an environment that supports learning Encourage different points of view Recognize (discuss) your own biases Maintain rigor Excite students about content Boston University School of Public Health
  35. 35. Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here Biostatistical skills are in demand Boston University School of Public Health
  36. 36. Important Questions Make Connections Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  What are the causes, prevention and treatment of autism, childhood obesity, asthma, cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease?  Is disease preventable with behavior change and modification of risk factors?  Are new drugs safe and effective?  How do genes affect health and longevity? Boston University School of Public Health
  37. 37. Discussion Points Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here  What are your biggest challenges in teaching?  Do you have a teaching mentor?  Is teaching valued by your chair, in A&P decisions? Boston University School of Public Health
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