In text citations
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Learn about how to use in-text citations with APA formatting

Learn about how to use in-text citations with APA formatting

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  • 1. In-Text Citations
  • 2. How to Create an In-Text Citation This is a paragraph from Chapter 22 of Mosaics: Reading and Writing Once you evaluate your sources and figure out which ones will help establish your argument, you then need to learn how to seamlessly integrate them into your paper. In other words, you need to introduce them effectively while showing readers they are credible and offer valuable evidence to back up your argument. Integrating your sources into your argument will help your readers understand the kind of information you are using. You also must show them you are using credible sources and evidence based on fact. Reference Flachmann, K. (2014). Mosaics: Reading and writing essays (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.
  • 3. How to Create an In-Text Citation Let’s say you want to use the following quote in your paper. Once you evaluate your sources and figure out which ones will help establish your argument, you then need to learn how to seamlessly integrate them into your paper. In other words, you need to introduce them effectively while showing readers they are credible and offer valuable evidence to back up your argument. Integrating your sources into your argument will help your readers understand the kind of information you are using. You also must show them you are using credible sources and evidence based on fact. Reference Flachmann, K. (2014). Mosaics: Reading and writing essays (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.
  • 4. How to Create an In-Text Citation Here is what your in-text citation should like like. “Once you evaluate your sources and figure out which ones will help establish your argument, you then need to learn how to seamlessly integrate them into your paper” (Flachmann, 2013, p. 476).
  • 5. How to Create an In-Text Citation First, you include the last name of the author, followed by a comma. “Once you evaluate your sources and figure out which ones will help establish your argument, you then need to learn how to seamlessly integrate them into your paper” (Flachmann, 2013, p. 476).
  • 6. How to Create an In-Text Citation Second, you include the year of publication, followed by a comma. “Once you evaluate your sources and figure out which ones will help establish your argument, you then need to learn how to seamlessly integrate them into your paper” (Flachmann, 2013, p. 476).
  • 7. How to Create an In-Text Citation Last, you include the page number of the quote. (Use para. For web pages that only have paragraphs and no page numbers.) “Once you evaluate your sources and figure out which ones will help establish your argument, you then need to learn how to seamlessly integrate them into your paper” (Flachmann, 2013, p. 476).
  • 8. Punctuating In-Text Citations Notice where your quotation marks and periods go when you are using in-text citations. “Once you evaluate your sources and figure out which ones will help establish your argument, you then need to learn how to seamlessly integrate them into your paper” (Flachmann, 2013, p. 476).
  • 9. In-Text Citations for Summary and Paraphrase What if you want to summarize or paraphrase this information? Once you evaluate your sources and figure out which ones will help establish your argument, you then need to learn how to seamlessly integrate them into your paper. In other words, you need to introduce them effectively while showing readers they are credible and offer valuable evidence to back up your argument. Integrating your sources into your argument will help your readers understand the kind of information you are using. You also must show them you are using credible sources and evidence based on fact. Reference Flachmann, K. (2014). Mosaics: Reading and writing essays (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.
  • 10. In-Text Citations for Summary and Paraphrase The only thing different about using an intext citation with a summary or paraphrase is that the page or paragraph number is not required. “Evaluating sources helps you establish an argument” (Flachmann, 2013).
  • 11. Signal Phrases We will learn more about signal phrases a little later. But you want to use them the first time you use any source. When you use a signal phrase, you do not need to use the author’s last name in the in-text citation, because you use it earlier in the paragraph. According to author Kim Flachmann in her book Mosaics: Reading and Writing Essays, “Once you evaluate your sources and figure out which ones will help establish your argument, you then need to learn how to seamlessly integrate them into your paper” (2013, p. 476).
  • 12. What if…. What if your source has an organization for an author? (National Education Association, 2013, para. 4) No author? (“First word or two of title,” 2013, p. 3) Two authors? (Jones and Mervin, 2010, para. 3) No date? (Jones, n.d., p. 345) Check out this website for more scenarios….. http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/res5e_ch09_s1-0001.html