Collaborative resource discovery: researchers needs for navigation in a sea of information

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  • Britannica Editors - March 13, 2012 For 244 years, the thick volumes of the Encyclopaedia Britannica have stood on the shelves of homes, libraries, and businesses everywhere, a source of enlightenment as well as comfort to their owners and users around the world. They’ve always been there. Year after year. Since 1768. Every. Single. Day. But not forever. Today we’ve announced that we will discontinue the 32-volume printed edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica when our current inventory is gone. A momentous event? In some ways, yes; the set is, after all, nearly a quarter of a millennium old. But in a larger sense this is just another historical data point in the evolution of human knowledge. For one thing, the encyclopedia will live on—in bigger, more numerous, and more vibrant digital forms. And just as important, we the publishers are poised, in the digital era, to serve knowledge and learning in new ways that go way beyond reference works. In fact, we already do.
  • Britannica Editors - March 13, 2012 For 244 years, the thick volumes of the Encyclopaedia Britannica have stood on the shelves of homes, libraries, and businesses everywhere, a source of enlightenment as well as comfort to their owners and users around the world. They’ve always been there. Year after year. Since 1768. Every. Single. Day. But not forever. Today we’ve announced that we will discontinue the 32-volume printed edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica when our current inventory is gone. A momentous event? In some ways, yes; the set is, after all, nearly a quarter of a millennium old. But in a larger sense this is just another historical data point in the evolution of human knowledge. For one thing, the encyclopedia will live on—in bigger, more numerous, and more vibrant digital forms. And just as important, we the publishers are poised, in the digital era, to serve knowledge and learning in new ways that go way beyond reference works. In fact, we already do.
  • http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/communications/internet-minute-infographic.html
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pT4EbM7dCMs
  • http://www.newstatesman.com/books/2012/01/appleyard-internet-book One thing the luminaries mostly agree on is that the technological revolution of the late 20th century is the biggest upheaval since Gutenberg, and that growing up in a information-surfing culture is affecting us on a personal and social level. Given that I read this book on a train on my Kindle, while opposite me a stressed mother entertained her toddler - who could not yet talk - by letting the child play Angry Birds on her iPhone, I find it hard to disagree. Yet the very obviousness of this point exposes a limitation of the collection format: by half­way through, I was sighing repeatedly: "Oh, not bloody Gutenberg again !" The overlap makes this book one to dip into rather than read at one sitting, but it's bursting with quotable phrases. Here is the writer Paul Kedrosky wondering whether he could give up the internet. "Could I quit? At some level, it seems a silly question, like asking how I feel about taking a breathing hiatus or if on Tuesdays I would give up gravity." He is one of the minority who are relatively untroubled by the netpocalypse, wondering whether he really had more BDTs (big deep thoughts) before he spent all day connected, or whether his memory is playing tricks on him. It is largely the dissenters from hand-wringing who are more intriguing. June Cohen argues that "the rise of social media is really a reprise" - a return to a storytelling culture. And the psychologist and writer Steven Pinker believes that "the most interesting trend in the development of the internet is not how it is changing people's ways of thinking but how it is adapting to the way people think". He argues that the web took off because of the graphical user interface that made engaging with it more intuitive. Now we are developing interfaces based on speech, movement and even thought. Ultimately, many of the contributors conclude that we don't know how the internet is changing our brains because we don't know how anything changes the hefty lumps of fat and water in our skulls: they are still so poorly understood. Or, as Emily Dickinson put it in the poem that gave Appleyard his title: "The Brain - is wider than the Sky -/For - put them side by side -/The one the other will contain/With ease - and You - beside".
  • http://www.public-domain-image.com/sport-public-domain-images-pictures/fishing-and-hunting-public-domain-images-pictures/camouflaged-hunters-hunt-birds-at-night.jpg.html
  • http://datavisualization.ch/showcases/just-landed-a-twitter-visualization-in-processing/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/blprnt/sets/72157627854698933/?page=2 http://datavisualization.ch/showcases/obama-one-people/ http://mashable.com/2010/07/21/twitter-moods-map/ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhmeEEnGjAE
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/blprnt/6281316931/in/set-72157627854698933/
  • http://mashable.com/2010/07/21/twitter-moods-map/
  • http://www.nature.com/news/open-access-the-true-cost-of-science-publishing-1.12676
  • http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/05/09/landmark-steps-liberate-open-data
  • Sir Bruce Williams Boyer lecture 1982 – title of his 4 th lecture
  • Collaborative resource discovery: researchers needs for navigation in a sea of information

    1. 1. Collaborative resource discovery: researchers needs for navigation in a sea of information OCLC Membership Meeting
    2. 2. • The online world • Scholars and their environment • Libraries • Collaboration: needs and models
    3. 3. Times of change 3
    4. 4. Winds of change Change: It’s Okay. Really Since 1768. Really.
    5. 5. 5
    6. 6. Pew research http://www.pewinternet.org/Presentations/2012/Mar/NROC.aspx
    7. 7. iPads even a 2 year old can use them Is a 2 year old a model for researchers?
    8. 8. Locking up access to information • Deep web • When is open really open • Risks to research, teaching and learning and collaboration • Locking up is more than big publishers • Up to 75% of government “publications” disappear in a decade
    9. 9. What is happening in the academy mrkuroud.tumblr.com/
    10. 10. After ipad? http://politicsjob.blogspot.com.au/2011/10/look-like-pro-clear-off-that-messy-desk.html
    11. 11. Dense information Read short segments Can use dense complex publication browse reading annotations – an impossible dream Marginalia, the print experience Access to lots of information – reliable, long term? Quality – role of scholarly publishers Many versions Mobile and tablets vs print
    12. 12. Debates • Joseph Konrath “Amazon will destroy you” • Emma Wright. “The future of the book business” – Publishing quality – Reading (esp children) – Market and value • Neil Gaiman - publishers must be like dandelions
    13. 13. Remembering and knowing • Students operate in print and e environments • Garland study – Small differences but – More repetition required for digital texts to impart the same information – Book readers digest material more easily (Szalavitz, Maria “Do e-books make it harder to remember what you just read?”)
    14. 14. A future narrative • Digital coevolution (Nick Harkaway) • Nicholas Carr “Is Google making us stupid?”
    15. 15. Game changes • Google • What is a publication? What is Data? • Open access 15
    16. 16. Google: licence to hunt 16 http://www.public-domain-image.com/sport-public-domain-images-pictures/fishing-and-hunting-public-domain-images-pictures/camouflaged-hunters-hunt-birds-at-night.jpg.html
    17. 17. data vs publishing http://datavisualization.ch/showcases/just-landed-a-twitter-visualization-in-processing/
    18. 18. 18
    19. 19. 19
    20. 20. 20
    21. 21. Open access But a total conversion will be slow in coming, because scientists still have every economic incentive to submit their papers to high-prestige subscription journals. The subscriptions tend to be paid for by campus libraries, and few individual scientists see the costs directly. From their perspective, publication is effectively free. (Van Noorden, 2013) 21
    22. 22. Government informaiton • President Obama’s Executive Order directs government-held data be made more accessible to the public and to entrepreneurs and others as fuel for innovation and economic growth. (9 May 2013) 22
    23. 23. Libraries
    24. 24. Libraries 24
    25. 25. 25
    26. 26. Collections • What makes a collection? • Curation • Corpus of knowledge • Collaboration 26 http://www.flickr.com/photos/paullew/3487810383/
    27. 27. Resource discovery • All for one and one for all? • Defining content • Scholar needs • When researchers cannot get hold of a work in their library, 87% (US) and 90% (UK) often or occasionally search for a free online version. (Schonfeld) http://listverse.com/2007/10/26/15-funny-street-signs/
    28. 28. • What value is location? • Collaboration a new frontier?
    29. 29. 29
    30. 30. • MOOCs new environment – many opportunities beyond traditional academic outcomes 30 Small beauty By SharonPerrett http://www.flickr.com/photos/81494696@N00/287199385/
    31. 31. • Are we “run over by technology”? • Sir Bruce Williams Boyer lecture 1982 • What must we do to demonstrate value? Flexibility, evolution 31
    32. 32. … the electronic screen lends the text within its frame the eternally pristine appearance of a newly cut page, and this produces in me a distancing feeling that, like Brecht’s dramatic techniques, allows me a freer reading, uncluttered by the sense of labouring under previous perusals by myself and others. Alberto Manguel cited in Barmé
    33. 33. Either you print things out, and find yourself oppressed by piles of documents you’ll never read, or you read online, but as soon as you click onto the next page you forget what you’ve just read, the very thing that has brought you to the page now on your screen Alberto Manguel cited in Barmé
    34. 34. References • Asian Studies Association of Australia (2002) Maximising Australia’s Asia knowledge: Repositioning and Renewal of a National Asset. Canberra, ASAA. http://coombs.anu.edu.au/SpecialProj/ASAA/asia-knowledge-book-v70.pdf • Australian Government. (2012) Australia in the Asian Century : white paper. Canberra: Australia in the Asian Century Implementation Task Force. http://asiancentury.dpmc.gov.au/white-paper/ • Barmé, G. R. (2011) “Slow reading and fast reference, East Asian history 37. http://www.eastasianhistory.org/37/barme • Boston College, Daniel R. Coquillette Rare Book Room (2010) Recent additions to the collection – Fall 2010: An illustrated guide to the exhibit. http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/schools/law_sites/library/pdf/RBR_items/pdf/F10RecentA • Britannica Editors (2012) Change: It’s Okay. Really. Encyclopaedia Britannica Blog. http://www.britannica.com/blogs/2012/03/change/ • Brockman, J. ed. (2012) How is the Internet changing the way you think? Allen & Unwin. (also see review by Appleyard at http://www.newstatesman.com/books/2012/01/appleyard-internet-book)
    35. 35. • Gainman, N. (2013) Keynote presentation to London Book Fair’s Digital Minds Conference. http://www.sfsignal.com/archives/2013/05/video-neil-gaimans-keynote-at-the-2013-london-bo • Harkaway, N. (2012) ... everything looks like a nail... Futurebook blog. http://www.futurebook.net/content/everything-looks-nail • Intel (2012) What happens in an Internet minute? http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/communications/internet-minute-infographic.html • Konrath, J. (2012) Amazon Will Destroy You, blog. • http://jakonrath.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/amazon-will-destroy-you.html • Murphy, S. (2012) Top 10 Apps Downloaded in 2011, Mashable. http://mashable.com/2011/12/23/top-10-apps/#4008910-Twitter • Miller, C. et al (2013) http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2013/05/01/parents-children-libraries-and-reading/ • Plato's Phaedrus from Plato in Twelve Volumes, Vol. 9, translated by H.N. Fowler. Ca mbridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1925.
    36. 36. • Rainie, L. (2012) The Shifting Education Landscape: Networked Learning, Pew Research. http://www.pewinternet.org/Presentations/2012/Mar/NROC.aspx • Schonfeld, R. (2013) “The Space Between: Our latest Ithaka S+R Issue Brief pinpoints where US faculty members and UK academics diverge and asks why?” http://www.sr.ithaka.org/blog-individual/space-between • Szalavitz, M. (2012) Do E-Books Make It Harder to Remember What You Just Read? TimeHealthland. http://healthland.time.com/2012/03/14/do-e-books-impair-memory/ • telstarlogistics (2010) A 2.5 Year-Old Has A First Encounter with An iPad, YouTube. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pT4EbM7dCMs • Tenopir, C. (2013) Scholarly Reading in a Digital Age: Some things change, some stay the same. Presentation given at ANU. • Wikipedia (2012) “Is Google making us stupid?”. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Is_Google_Making_Us_Stupid%3F • Wright, E. (2010) The Future of the Book Business: A Classicist’s View, Futurebook blog. http://www.futurebook.net/content/future-book-business-classicist’s-view 36

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