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INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: HOW TO PROMOTE POSITIVE CLASSROOM BEHAVIOUR IN STUDENTS?
 

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: HOW TO PROMOTE POSITIVE CLASSROOM BEHAVIOUR IN STUDENTS?

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Halifah Husaini (08D0013), Aisah Lamit (08D0047), Roudhahtul Isa (08D0008), Diploma in Primary Education session 2008/2011. ...

Halifah Husaini (08D0013), Aisah Lamit (08D0047), Roudhahtul Isa (08D0008), Diploma in Primary Education session 2008/2011.

PRESENTATION TOPIC: HOW TO PROMOTE POSITIVE CLASSROOM BEHAVIOUR IN STUDENTS?, Semester 5 (Year 2010), Course facilitator: Dr. Koay Teng Leong, Course name: INCLUSIVE EDUCATION, UNIVERSITI BRUNEI DARUSSALAM.

Sub-topics:
Presented by Halifah Husaini (08D0013):
- Relationship Building Strategies
- Social Skills Instruction

Presented by Aisah Lamit (08D0047):
- Antecedent Based Interventions
- Self Management Interventions

Presented by Roudhahtul Isa (08D0008):
- Group Oriented Management Systems
- Behavior Reduction Interventions

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    INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: HOW TO PROMOTE POSITIVE CLASSROOM BEHAVIOUR IN STUDENTS? INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: HOW TO PROMOTE POSITIVE CLASSROOM BEHAVIOUR IN STUDENTS? Presentation Transcript

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    • Behavior reduction techniques Strategies to promote good classroom behavior Antecedents-based interventions Group-oriented management systems Self- management interventions Relationship-building strategies Social skills instruction
    • Behavior reduction techniques Strategies to promote good classroom behavior Antecedents-based interventions Group-oriented management systems Self- management interventions Relationship-building strategies Social skills instruction
      • Get to know & demonstrate a Personal Interest in Students
      • Develop students’ Self-Esteem
      • Use Humor
      • Conduct class Meetings & Use dialoguing
      • Be Aware of Non-Verbal Communication
      • Use Affective Education Techniques
      • Resolving classroom conflicts
      • All shared their opinions
      • Placing a box in the classroom
      • Physical distance/ personal space
      • Eye contacts
      • Hand gestures/body movements
      • Attending the students’ extracurricular events
      • Greeting them in the hallways
      • Listening actively
      • Letting them know that you missed them
      • Allowing them to do things for you
      • Recognizing special events in students’ lives
      • By praising
      • Recognise their abilities/skills
      • Listening to them
      • Feeling of succeed
      • Help students learn how to work in groups
      • Make friends
      • Recognize & respond appropriately to others’ feelings
      • Resolve conflicts & emotions
      • Deal with frustration & anger
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    • Changes in classroom events, environments, and stimuli that precede behavior (Conroy, Asmus, Sellers, & Ladwig, 2005; Everston et al., 2006; Stichter, Hudson, & Sasso, 2005)
      • Give clear and direct directions.
      • Use teacher proximity and movement.
      • Use cues
      How? How? How?
      • Speak in a respectful, firm, and calm voice and manner.
      • Phrase your command so that they focus on what they should do and phrased directly .
      • Stand near students.
      • Placing students desks near you.
      • Talking briefly with students while walking around the room.
      • Delivering praise, reprimands, and consequences while standing close to students.
      • Monitoring your movement.
      • Nonverbal - Physical gestures can be used to prompt group or individual responses.
      • Examples:
      • individualized eye contact.
      • hand signals.
      • head movements.
      • Verbal remainders.
      Home
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    • Actively involve students in monitoring and changing their behaviors (Salend & Sylvestre, 2005)
      • Self-monitoring.
      • Self-evaluation.
      • Self-reinforcement.
      • Self-managed free token response-cost.
      • Self-instruction.
      • Self-managing peer interactions.
      Home
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      • Involves teacher and a group of students
      • Managing behavior problems
      • Carefully observe the impact of these systems on students
      • Take note :
      • Peer pressure
      • Scapegoating
      • Choose target behaviors that benefit all students and groups can achieve
      • Teach students how the system works,
      • Clarify the behavior,
      • Set reasonable goals,
      • Monitor the system – provide students with feedbacks
          • (Babyak, Luze, & Kamps, 2000)
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    • Applied to entire group
      • Free time
      • Class Trip
      • Class Party
      • Group Games
      • Special Privilege
      • The class are given free tokens
      • Removed when a disruptive behavior occurs
      • The class is divided into 2 or more group
      • Each group’s inappropriate behaviors are recorded in front of the whole class
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      • Give evaluation form to each student in the group
      • Rate the group’s behavior
      • Compare the teacher and the students’ ratings
      Group Average System Consensus-based System
    • Applied to the whole class Token Economy Systems Students earn token for showing appropriate behavior Individual Students
    • Token Economy Systems
    • Applied to the whole class Select students Partners/peers
      • Promote good behavior
      • Decrease misbehavior
      • Cooperation
      • Teach responsibility
      • Get used to variety of behaviors
      • Give positive methods of dealing problems
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      • Includes :
      • Introducing a new stimulus to recapture the student’s attention;
      • Signaling the student verbally and nonverbally to stop a behavior;
      • Offering to help the student with a task;
      • When you ___________, then you can __________
      • If you __________, then I will/you can __________
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      • Approach students individually with a positive or empathetic comment
      • Briefly describing the misbehavior
      • Briefly describing the desired behavior
      • Explain why the desired behavior is important
      • Have student practice and role-play or repeat steps in the desired behavior
      • Delivering feedback, praise, or points
      • Ask students to perform easier or preferred tasks
      • Motivate students to do a difficult or unpleasant task
      • Reinforce and increase a positive behavior
      • Cannot coexist with the misbehavior that are expected to decrease
      • Reduce the incidence of misbehavior
      • (Jester, 2002)
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      • In certain occasions
      • Infrequent, brief, firm
      • Immediately after the misbehavior occurs
      • Should be focused on the behavior rather than the student (Ferko, 2005)
      • Decrease misbehavior
      • Improve learning environment
      • Promote good behavior
      • Before;
      • During;
      • and after a misbehavior
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    • In self monitoring, students measure their own behaviors by using a data collection system (Harris et al., 2005)
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    • Students are taught to evaluate their in-class behavior according to some standard or scale (Reid et al., 2005)
      • For examples, you can give a handout with the following behaviors:
      • I raised my hand to answer questions.
      • I paid attention to the teacher.
      • Students can also be asked to respond to a series of questions that prompt them to evaluate their behavior.
      • For examples:
      • How would you describe your behavior in class today?
      • What positive behaviors did you use? What happened as a result of these behaviors?
    • Students are taught to evaluate their behavior and then deliver self-selected rewards if appropriate (Reid et al., 2005)
      • Give the student an index card with a certain number of symbols.
      • The symbols represent the number of inappropriate behaviors the student may exhibit before losing the agreed-on reinforcement.
      • After each in appropriate behavior , the student crosses out one of the symbols on the index card. If any symbols remain in at the end of the class time, the student receives the agreed-on reinforcement.
      • indentify problems (“What am I being asked to do”)
      • generate potential solutions (“What are the ways to do it?”)
      • evaluate solutions (“What is the best way?”)
      • use appropriate solutions (“Did I do it?”)
      • determine whether the solutions were effective (“Did it work?”)
      • When students are being bothered by peers, they use 3-steps by:
      • telling peers “stop! I don’t like that,”
      • ignoring or walking away from peers if they do not stop,
      • informing the teacher that they told them to stop, tried to ignore them, and are now seeking the teachers help.
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