July 21, 2014
East: Physical VISION
“to see”
South: Mental KNOWLEDGE
“to know”
West: Emotional ATTITUDES/
BELIEFS
“to believe”
North: Sp...
Educational opportunities for Aboriginal learners
Diverse educational opportunities
Assist Aboriginal learners in achievin...
Aboriginal people can best define the needs of
Aboriginal learners and their communities
Bring understanding of the formal...
Inspire, encourage and empower Aboriginal students
APSIP members serving as positive role models
Share personal lived expe...
A grassroots organization, APSIP began in 1998
Common goal – increasing the number of
Aboriginal learners in the province’...
Gaps between the educational attainment of
Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations still
remain
In the 2011 Aboriginal P...
Ontario’s Learning Ministries have identified
Aboriginal education as a key priority
Improving Aboriginal learners’ achiev...
20.1
4.55.2 5.4
Canada Ontario
Aboriginal Population Growth 2006-
2011
Aboriginal Non-Aboriginal
3% 0% 2% 2%
10%
21%
14%11%
16%
17%
1% 1% 2%
Aboriginal Identity Population in Canada
Newfoundland & Labrador Prince Edward...
Aboriginal Post-Secondary Information Program (APSIP)
APSIP is uniquely tailored to recruiting the Aboriginal student popu...
Community-based methodology
Year long engagement in communities
Members of the collective also serve as role models and
be...
Wk. Region/Community Dates Coordinators
1. North Western ON Sept 15- 19, 2014 Anna Chief
2. Hwy. 17 Loop Sept 22- 26, 2014...
1. Indigenous recruitment is based on capacity building and
strengthening relationships between Aboriginal learners, liais...
3540
3472
4185
Breakdown per year (2011 - 2013)
20111
2012
20131
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000
2011
2012
2013
Breakdown per week (2011-2013)
“… I liked that I had a chance to talk to the
university representatives, and have questions
answered… I got information o...
“…APSIP managed to turn over new leaves for many
students and I am truly grateful. As mentioned in
person, it is so incred...
Visit the Aboriginal Student Services
Department at your local institution
Get to know your local Aboriginal Recruitment
L...
Get informed!
ON Ministry of
Education: Aboriginal
Education Strategy
Aboriginal Post-
Secondary Education
and Training Po...
Website: www.apsip.com
Facebook: Aboriginal Post-Secondary
Information Program (APSIP)
Twitter: APSIP @AboriginalPSE
Aboriginal Post-Secondary Information Program - Jolene John - SASSY 2014
Aboriginal Post-Secondary Information Program - Jolene John - SASSY 2014
Aboriginal Post-Secondary Information Program - Jolene John - SASSY 2014
Aboriginal Post-Secondary Information Program - Jolene John - SASSY 2014
Aboriginal Post-Secondary Information Program - Jolene John - SASSY 2014
Aboriginal Post-Secondary Information Program - Jolene John - SASSY 2014
Aboriginal Post-Secondary Information Program - Jolene John - SASSY 2014
Aboriginal Post-Secondary Information Program - Jolene John - SASSY 2014
Aboriginal Post-Secondary Information Program - Jolene John - SASSY 2014
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Aboriginal Post-Secondary Information Program - Jolene John - SASSY 2014

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Presented at the 2014 Student Affairs and Services Symposium at York University.
Learn about the Aboriginal Post-Secondary Information
Program (APSIP) and how it empowers Aboriginal learners,
leaders, educators, institutions, and communities to collaborate to increase access, retention, and inclusion of Indigenous peoples, pedagogies, epistemologies, and methodologies within academia.

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  • She:kon! WELCOME!

    [Introduction]


    I would like to begin by sharing the Centre for Aboriginal Student Services’ Acknowledgement of Indigenous Peoples and Traditional Territories:

    The Centre for Aboriginal Student Services recognizes that many Indigenous nations have longstanding relationships with the territories upon which York University campuses are located that precede the establishment of York University. We acknowledge our presence on the traditional territories of the Mississaugas of New Credit, the Huron-Wendat, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy and the Metis Nation of Ontario.

    (Thanksgiving Address teaching) Likewise, I would like to begin in a good way by addressing thanks to all of you for coming here today to witness this presentation. Hopefully we can bring our minds together as one and we can open our minds, hearts, and spirits to understanding why Aboriginal recruitment and Aboriginal education matters.


    Presentation Notes:
    -Good for Guidance Counselors;
    -scope and scale for stakeholders; who is your audience?
    -numbers (cross-section of numbers)
    -Andre will send me a map of all of the APSIP Recruitment areas
  • The presentation is divided into four quatrains. [To the left, this here is a Medicine Wheel]. The Medicine Wheel is a multipurpose teaching tool that can be found within many Aboriginal nations. It is important to note that there is considerable variance in teachings across nations. Nevertheless, a common cross-cultural feature of the Medicine Wheel is the special consideration for the balance of a person’s physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wellness.

    What guides the current presentation is the Anishnaabe Medicine Wheel Model, received from Tyendinaga Mohawk and Executive Director of the OFIFC, Sylvia Maracle. Her teachings begin in the eastern doorway, where the sun rises and all of creation begins. Here is where we begin our physical journey with a vision. To have a vision, you must look at the world around you and identify a problem, or an issue, and then work to find ways of addressing that issue and finding solutions. In order to do so, we are going to have to tap into our mental and cognitive selves to find knowledge, which is in the southern doorway. To know, one must look back, or (re)search (look again), and consider how historical implications could have an affect on the current situation. And, it is also important to consider approaches or solutions to addressing those problems. The western doorway is where the sun sets. It is also where attitudes and believes are at stake. Once you have received the knowledge, you must believe and trust the process through establishing wise practices, developing partnerships, harnessing relationships, etc. And finally, the northern doorway offers the spirit and it is where action takes place. Once you have considered all aspects of the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual, you will have carefully analyzed the issue from a holistic perspective, understand all implications, and will know how to move forward, and to act or “to do” in a good way.
  • “To have vision, is too see”

    This section will explore who we are as the APSIP body, our vision, mandate, goals and organizational structure.



  • The Aboriginal Post Secondary Information Program (APSIP) is committed to enhancing the awareness of educational opportunities for Aboriginal learners while empowering them to pursue post-secondary education.

    APSIP seeks to highlight the diverse opportunities available to Aboriginal learners interested in post-secondary education; thus enabling APSIP members to assist Aboriginal learners in achieving their educational goals.

    APSIP seeks to enhance the development of Information Programs in the area of recruitment, educational awareness, accessibility and participation; designed to increase the number of Aboriginal learners pursuing post-secondary education in Canada, specially targeting Ontario, Quebec and the sovereign Nations linked by treaty to Canada, as a result of the network between Aboriginal communities and this body.

    It is the dedication to Aboriginal learners’ great well-being and bright futures that grounds, guides and energizes APSIP.
  • APSIP functions on the understanding and principle that Aboriginal people can best define the needs of Aboriginal learners and their communities, as well as increase the educational enrolment and attainment of their members.

    APSIP’s ability to bring understanding of the formal educational process to community educational leaders will increase the enrolment and retention of Aboriginal learners within the post-secondary system.

    The transfer of knowledge of the formal educational process is accomplished through collaboration and partnership between APSIP members and the educational leaders within the targeted Aboriginal communities.
  • The goal of APSIP members is to inspire, encourage and empower Aboriginal students; this is achieved, in part, by APSIP members serving as positive role models.

    By sharing personal lived experiences with perspective students, APSIP members are able to highlight achievements gained through the post-secondary educational system.

    APSIP encourages the sharing of knowledge and wise practices among APSIP members, our institutions and the Aboriginal communities with whom we work in order to provide the best services available for our communities.
  • *everybody has a role and responsibility to play- contribution-----a voice----that matters

    Slide of the Weekly Contacts for Guidance Counsellors
  • Sylvia Maracle, as well as many other Indigenous scholars, Elders, and academics often prompt us to ask ourselves, “who are we, where do we come from, and where are we going”. Not only is this imperative for us as individuals to understand and locate ourselves in relation to the world and systems around us, as an APSIP collective, it is important to have the contextual knowledge base and understanding of how we came to be. It is critical that we understand the original intent and purpose behind the creation of this grassroots program. In turn, we will be able to understand our own individual roles and responsibilities in relationship with APSIP. As we aspire to maintain the vision and guiding principles around APSIP, we continue to work collaboratively to co-construct, co-create, and create opportunities for change, improvement and transformation.
  • A grassroots organization, APSIP began in 1998 when a dedicated group of Aboriginal student support staff (Road Warriors) came together with a common goal – increasing the number of Aboriginal learners in the province’s post-secondary institutions.

    Today, APSIP consists of 38 member institutions and has representation from Colleges, Universities and Aboriginal postsecondary Institutes across Ontario and Quebec.

    APSIP would not be as functional nor as successful today, if it were not for the original vision of Road Warriors, followed by the support of the Ontario government, the Ministry of Education, and the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities who have recognized concerns in Aboriginal education and have sought to work in relationship and partnership with Aboriginal peoples.
  • What are these contemporary concerns?

    16 years after the establishment of APSIP, gaps between the educational attainment of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations still remain throughout Canada (Statistics Canada, 2011).

    In the 2011 Aboriginal Postsecondary Education Framework, the government of Ontario articulated its commitment to improving Aboriginal learners’ access to, and achievement in, postsecondary institutions. This very same commitment drives the work of the Aboriginal Postsecondary Information Program (APSIP).

    The population rate of Aboriginal peoples in Canada is growing much faster than the general population, increasing by 20.1% from 2006-2011 (Employment and Social Development Canada).

    “Lets have a closer look”….
  • GAPS:

    This graph is from the 2006 Census and outlines the gaps between the levels of education of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations, aged 25-64 years old.

    As you can see, Aboriginal learners fall 19% below the general population in achieving High School diploma attainment. Those who graduate High School are only 3% behind the non-Aboriginal population. Although Stats Can reveals that Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations are on par in terms of achieving a college or trade certification, it makes me question the justification and strategy of coupling college and trade certification within the same category. As you can see, the rate at which Aboriginal peoples who attain a university level of education is a staggering 15% lower than the non-Aboriginal population. Thus, how many Aboriginal learners are pursuing fields in the trades, compared to those pursuing higher levels of education? Nonetheless, the gaps still remain.


    Source: Statistics Canada. Educational Portrait of Canada, Census 2006. Ottawa, Statistics Canada, 2008 (Cat. No. 97-560-X2006001).
  • -Key priority
    -The framework focuses on two key challenges:
    Improving Aboriginal learners’ achievements in educational settings
    Closing the educational attainment gap

    [These five educational principles drive the APSET Policy Framework.

    This commitment also entails:
    An allocation of funding dollars (MTCU) for each eligible institution with which to dedicate to the success of Aboriginal learners.
    As a result of the commitment of the Ontario government, we are able to provide Aboriginal students with: a physical space (such as the Centre for Aboriginal Student Services) to help establish a sense of belonging within the institution; a knowledgeable support team for the students; and culturally appropriate programs and services.

    **KEY FACT: Almost all of Ontario’s colleges and university’s Aboriginal Student Services are solely funded through the Ministry of Training, Colleges & Universities.**
  • Aboriginal people – Diverse groups living across the country

    As you can see from this graph here, new data from the National Household Survey (NHS) shows that the Aboriginal population increased by 20.1% between 2006 and 2011, compared with 5.2% for the non-Aboriginal population.

    Ontario’s general population has actually descended from the 2001-2006 report from 6.3% to 5.4% in 2011. The rate at which the Aboriginal population in Ontario is growing at 4.5%. The province of Ontario has the highest Aboriginal population in all of Canada.

    Canada:
    Aborigina: 1,400,685
    Non-Aboriginal: 351,580,000

    Ontario
    Aboriginal: 301,425.00
    Non-Aboriginal: 13,538,000.00
  • According to Stats Canada 2011, there were approximately 1,400,685 Aboriginal peoples in Canada.

    (grey) Ontario: 301,425 21.5
    (green) British Columbia: 232, 290 16.6
    (purple) Alberta: 220,695 15.8
    (blue) Manitoba: 195,900 14.0
    (yellow) Saskatchewan: 157, 740 11.3

    As you can see, Ontario has the largest population of Aboriginal peoples in Canada (21%), followed by the western provinces (British Columbia (16.6), Alberta (15.8), Manitoba (14.0), and Saskatchewan (11.3).

    Source:
  • The Aboriginal population is much younger than the overall Canadian population. In 2011, the median age of the total Aboriginal population was 27.7 years, which was 13 years lower than the median age of non-Aboriginals at 40.6 years.

    The population rate of Aboriginal young people in Canada is growing exponentially; therefore, it is critical that we invest in Canada’s future through not only access to quality education, trades, careers, and other forms of participation in Canada’s economy, but also increased access to self-identification frameworks and opportunities for self-determination.

    Our task is to align university and college frameworks to meet that of the provincial and federal government priorities, while simultaneously making space for consultation with Indigenous scholars, Elders, and tribal governing bodies to ultimately recognize that Indigenous knowledge and Indigenous educational theory plays a critical piece in transforming systems of education.

    Source: ESDC calculations based on Statistics Canada. 2011 National Household Survey, Catalogue no. 99-011-X2011028 [cited July 18, 2013].
  • Once you have adequately addressed your vision and knowledge, you can believe and trust in the process.

    PICTURE/STORY: I purposely chose the above picture because this mural and tipi structure was showcased at one of the schools that we had visited along our travels. It was co-created in partnership and collaboration with Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students, teachers, and Elders. There are many teachings behind that mural, however, I believe that it represents the importance of accepting, legitimizing, and making space for Indigenous worldviews and knowledge within educational systems. And, this picture gives me hope and makes me believe that the educational system will no longer be a place of mistrust, violence, segregation, and racism for our future generations, but, that it will soon have the capacity to see, know, and believe in the power of Indigenous Knowledge in transforming our current system.

    The following slides will inform you about the various roles Aboriginal Recruitment Officers/Liaisions play, and our roles and responsibilities within APSIP, and finally, we will provide you with insight as to how our work differentiates from the work of mainstream recruitment.
  • Planting the seed of accessibility: By this, I mean countering the achievement gap. If you look at York’s student population of 55, 000 students, only approximately 300 of those students self-identify as Aboriginal. How many faculty do we have here at York University? Of the ‘x’ amount of staff, we only have 6 who identify as “Aboriginal”.

    Our roles are to help improve accessibility, recruitment and rentention of Aboriginal learners to post-secondary education.
  • How do our roles as Aboriginal Recruitment Officers differentiate from that of mainstream UIP/CIP Recruitment Officers?

    Using a community based approach, APSIP members work collaboratively to organize a yearly twelve week recruitment cycle visiting Aboriginal students in urban centres and reserves

    Year long engagement in communities has allowed APSIP to foster sustainable partnerships and build strong connections with educational and community leaders

    Members of the collective also serve as role models and become familiar points of contact in institutions that can seem challenging to navigate

    Through these relationships, APSIP is able to successfully define and meet the needs of Aboriginal learners and their communities, as well as increase the postsecondary educational enrolment and attainment of Aboriginal students

    Not only are we committed to the recruitment and retention of self-identified Aboriginal students, we are also actively involved in our respective Aboriginal communities both on and off campus.

    *Assert our legitimacy*
  • Our current organizational structure strives to foster legitimacy, credibility, and accountability among APSIP members, the institutions we represent, and largely, our respective community partners.
    Currently, APSIP has 38 active members from Ontario and Quebec colleges and universities and community organizations. From these members, the Executive Council is elected yearly at the winter AGM and includes two Co-Chairs, a Governance Chair, a Recruitment Chair, a Communications Chair and an Administrative chair. All members of the executive council assume duties as assigned in the Terms of Reference. Weekly coordinators, assigned yearly, are charged with developing the travel schedule, pulling on local expertise and community connections.
  • I would like to draw closer attention to the roll of the Weekly Coordinators. As you can see, there are twelve weeks on the APSIP road, and to the right are the Weekly Coordinators
  • APSIP’s outreach expands throughout the North Western, Central, Eastern and Southwestern Regions of Ontario, Quebec, and James Bay.

    12 week tour: covered Ontario and spent one week in Quebec

    70 Events: organized and attended events in high schools, community centres, Friendship Centres, etc.

  • 2,906 students estimated attended

    ***Show the 2011, 2012, and 2013 numbers…****
  • Urban vs. Rural educational landscapes.
  • *Slide will change based on audience.
    *Support will look different from Guidance Counsellors than it would AEC reps then it would staff/colleagues then it would recruiters

    -Know your local weekly coordinator

  • Visit our website, for personal College and University liaison bios, some guidance counsellor resources, etc.

    Follow us along our travels by ‘liking’ us on Facebook, or, ‘follow’ us on twitter.

    And, as I have said before, if you or someone you know is interested in coming to school or planning a visit for Aboriginal learners, please do not hesitate to get in touch with one of the Aboriginal Recruitment Liaisons at your institution.

    Questions?! Comments?
  • Aboriginal Post-Secondary Information Program - Jolene John - SASSY 2014

    1. 1. July 21, 2014
    2. 2. East: Physical VISION “to see” South: Mental KNOWLEDGE “to know” West: Emotional ATTITUDES/ BELIEFS “to believe” North: Spiritual ACTION “to do” Teaching from: Sylvia Maracle Tyendinaga, Mohawk (OFIFC) Anishnaabe Medicine Wheel Model
    3. 3. Educational opportunities for Aboriginal learners Diverse educational opportunities Assist Aboriginal learners in achieving their educational goals Information Programs in the area of recruitment, educational awareness, accessibility and participation Increase the number of Aboriginal learners pursuing post- secondary education in Canada Specially targeting Ontario, Quebec and the sovereign Nations linked by treaty to Canada
    4. 4. Aboriginal people can best define the needs of Aboriginal learners and their communities Bring understanding of the formal educational process to community educational leaders Increase the enrolment and retention of Aboriginal learners within the post-secondary system Establish collaboration and partnership between APSIP members and the educational leaders within the targeted Aboriginal communities
    5. 5. Inspire, encourage and empower Aboriginal students APSIP members serving as positive role models Share personal lived experiences with perspective students Highlight achievements gained through the post- secondary educational system APSIP encourages the sharing of knowledge and wise practices among APSIP members, our institutions and the Aboriginal communities Provide the best services available for our communities.
    6. 6. A grassroots organization, APSIP began in 1998 Common goal – increasing the number of Aboriginal learners in the province’s post- secondary institutions Today, APSIP consists of 38 member institutions Representation from Colleges, Universities and Aboriginal post-secondary institutions across Ontario and Quebec
    7. 7. Gaps between the educational attainment of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations still remain In the 2011 Aboriginal Postsecondary Education Framework, the government of Ontario articulated its commitment to improving Aboriginal learners’ access to, and achievement in, post-secondary institutions Population rate of Aboriginal peoples in Canada is growing much faster than the general population
    8. 8. Ontario’s Learning Ministries have identified Aboriginal education as a key priority Improving Aboriginal learners’ achievements in educational settings Closing the educational attainment gaps Five Educational principles: Excellence and accountability Equity, inclusion, and respect for diversity Cooperation on and shared responsibility for postsecondary education and training Respect for Constitutional and treaty rights Respect for Indigenous Knowledge, languages, and cultures
    9. 9. 20.1 4.55.2 5.4 Canada Ontario Aboriginal Population Growth 2006- 2011 Aboriginal Non-Aboriginal
    10. 10. 3% 0% 2% 2% 10% 21% 14%11% 16% 17% 1% 1% 2% Aboriginal Identity Population in Canada Newfoundland & Labrador Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia New Brunswick Quebec Ontario Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta British Columbia Yukon Northwest Territories Nunavut
    11. 11. Aboriginal Post-Secondary Information Program (APSIP) APSIP is uniquely tailored to recruiting the Aboriginal student population. We do this by visiting Aboriginal Friendship Centres, high schools with a high population of Aboriginal students, powwows, alternative schools, colleges, and Aboriginal organizations. When we are not on the road, we are committed to strengthening community ties. This is achieved through site visits, community councils/socials/gatherings, one-on-one counseling appointments, and formal group presentations. The role of the Aboriginal Recruitment Officer/ Liaison is to counter the history of exclusion from post-secondary education. By reaching out to Aboriginal youth, the ARO begins planting the seed of accessibility. Aboriginal peoples have historically been excluded from post-secondary institutions.
    12. 12. Community-based methodology Year long engagement in communities Members of the collective also serve as role models and become familiar points of contact in institutions that can seem challenging to navigate APSIP is able to successfully define and meet the needs of Aboriginal learners and their communities, as well as increase the postsecondary educational enrolment and attainment of Aboriginal students
    13. 13. Wk. Region/Community Dates Coordinators 1. North Western ON Sept 15- 19, 2014 Anna Chief 2. Hwy. 17 Loop Sept 22- 26, 2014 JoAnn Robertson & Melvin Peltier 3. North Shore/Manitoulin Sept 29- Oct 3, 2014 JoAnn Robertson & Melvin Peltier 4. Sudbury/North Bay Oct 6- 10, 2014 Gerard Peltier, Nancy Burke & Brad Robinson 5. BREAK WEEK Oct 13- 17, 2014 *optional visits* 6. GTA & Oshawa Oct 20- 24, 2014 Jolene John, Quazance Boissoneau, Vero Roussel & Beth Kotierk 7. Southern Georgian Bay Oct 27- 31, 2014 April Jones & Vero Roussel 8. Western Quebec & Ottawa Nov 3- 7, 2014 Mallory Whiteduck, Kakwira Cook & Beth Kotierk 8. Eastern Ontario Nov 10- 14, 2014 Dustin Brant, Ashley Maracle & Shari Beaver 10 Six Nations, Hamilton & Niagara Nov 17- 21, 2014 Lacey Hill & Jennie Anderson 11 Southwestern Ontario Nov 24- 38, 2014 Roxane Shawana & Kandice Baptiste 12 James Bay (TBA) (TBA)
    14. 14. 1. Indigenous recruitment is based on capacity building and strengthening relationships between Aboriginal learners, liaison staff, educational leaders, institutions, and communities. 2. APSIP provides a critical opportunity for Indigenous liaisons to act as positive role models for our youth. 3. The requirements of APSIP members vary from that of mainstream recruiters, and, this unique variance is particularly relevant because not only are our individual roles government mandated, funded, and prioritized, it is also holistically relevant and relational for Indigenous peoples, communities, institutions and our APSIP body.
    15. 15. 3540 3472 4185 Breakdown per year (2011 - 2013) 20111 2012 20131
    16. 16. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 2011 2012 2013 Breakdown per week (2011-2013)
    17. 17. “… I liked that I had a chance to talk to the university representatives, and have questions answered… I got information on scholarships and programs that helped me with planning what I am going to do in the future.” Grade 12 Student at Hamilton Event, 2011
    18. 18. “…APSIP managed to turn over new leaves for many students and I am truly grateful. As mentioned in person, it is so incredibly relevant to the students when they see fellow Aboriginal peoples who are successful, well-spoken, and driven”. Sharla Niroopan Grade 7/8 Teacher First Nations School of Toronto, TDSB
    19. 19. Visit the Aboriginal Student Services Department at your local institution Get to know your local Aboriginal Recruitment Liaison If you would like to coordinate a school visit or an information fair, then contact a Weekly Coordinator Find out when we will be in your area and contact us! Visit www.apsip.com for more information!
    20. 20. Get informed! ON Ministry of Education: Aboriginal Education Strategy Aboriginal Post- Secondary Education and Training Policy Framework Ontario Native Education Counselling Association Additional Resources: Council of Ontario Universities COU’s Aboriginal Self- Identification Project Report COU’s Indigenous Issues in Post- Secondary Education: Building on Best Practices Report
    21. 21. Website: www.apsip.com Facebook: Aboriginal Post-Secondary Information Program (APSIP) Twitter: APSIP @AboriginalPSE
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