Easton’s resident project

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  • Pervious deck is extended, connecting directly onto the first tier of gardenproviding direct access to the open amenity green space, open up a larger area for entertaining.
  • A smaller intimate nook is placed on the second tier of the garden, allowing for quieter times for natural contemplation and reflection. These spaces are separated into two different levels; the nook is a little distance away but still connected to the larger area, so user can take some time getting into it, strolling under a tree that cools the seating area
  • By diving the front yard into three sections, a clear inviting walkway and outdoor gathering space is created. Lower shrubs and herbaceous are planted on the southeastern swale providing a partial enclosure area to the front yard while remain sightline from the street for any safety concerns.
  • The hydrologic sequence begins at the highest site elevation where roof runoff is captured in a rain barrel on deck and a gravel swale alongside the building. Rain barrel will be installed on the deck allowing extra water storage and act as the reservoir for vegetable planters below.
  • Stormwater runoff contributes pollutants to streams, rivers and lakes. Pesticides, herbicides,and fertilizers come from residential lawns, commercial landscaping, and recreationalfacilities like golf courses. There can be residuals that leach from land that wasonce farmland. Heavy metals come from vehicles, buildings, roofs, and industrial sites.Oil and grease drip regularly from cars onto streets, parking lots, and are occasionallydumped into storm drains by residents performing maintenance on vehicles and equipment.Pathogens and bacteria in runoff can come from pet waste, broken or leaking sanitarysewers, wildlife, or sanitary sewer overflows.Bioswales can remove and immobilize or break down a large portion of pollutants foundin stormwater runoff. Bioswales have achieved high levels of removal of suspended solids(TSS), turbidity, and oil and grease. They can also remove a moderate percentage ofmetals and nutrients in runoff. This lower level of removal compared to sediment or oiland grease is due partly to the large percentage of metals and nutrients that appear in dissolvedform in runoff. The term “dissolved form” includes microscopic particulate thatgenerally is referred to as turbidity.Bioswales can achieve good removal of metals or nutrients that are attached to suspendedsoil particles through settling of the solids by natural flocculation and vegetation uptake.Infiltrated storm water uses the soil and, in some cases depending upon the pollutant, themicrobiology in the soil to filter dissolved pollutants from runoff. Since most bioswalesinfiltrate only a portion of their flow, removal rates for pollutants in dissolved form arelower than those for sediment or oil and grease unless retention time for the pollutants inthe bioswale is sufficient for natural flocculation, infiltration, biological conversion/consumption, and/or vegetative uptake to occur.
  • The shrubs and grasses abundantly planted in the swale alongside of the building will contribute to storm water management by moving water from one part of the site to another while allowing for cleaning, infiltration, and groundwater recharge. The heat, shade and runoff created from the building in turn will create a moist shaded microclimate, which allows for this otherwise unsustainable rich foundation planting. will become a focal point for the 1st tier of backyard. When integrated into the landscape as in this garden, they also serve the purpose of natural engagement.
  • The shrubs and grasses abundantly planted in the swale alongside of the building will contribute to storm water management by moving water from one part of the site to another while allowing for cleaning, infiltration, and groundwater recharge. The heat, shade and runoff created from the building in turn will create a moist shaded microclimate, which allows for this otherwise unsustainable rich foundation planting. will become a focal point for the 1st tier of backyard. When integrated into the landscape as in this garden, they also serve the purpose of natural engagement.
  • The planting plan is design to restore native plant community, achieve biodiversity, create a low-maintenance landscape, and improve storm water quality and quantity. The natural planting zone create habitat for migrating birds, beneficial insects, and amphibious species, connecting to existing contiguous vegetated system extends wildlife corridors across the site boundaries. This new patch of habitat is linked to nearby woodland and wetland open space areas.
  • The planting plan is design to restore native plant community, achieve biodiversity, create a low-maintenance landscape, and improve storm water quality and quantity. The natural planting zone create habitat for migrating birds, beneficial insects, and amphibious species, connecting to existing contiguous vegetated system extends wildlife corridors across the site boundaries. This new patch of habitat is linked to nearby woodland and wetland open space areas.
  • The planting plan is design to restore native plant community, achieve biodiversity, create a low-maintenance landscape, and improve storm water quality and quantity. The natural planting zone create habitat for migrating birds, beneficial insects, and amphibious species, connecting to existing contiguous vegetated system extends wildlife corridors across the site boundaries. This new patch of habitat is linked to nearby woodland and wetland open space areas.
  • The planting plan is design to restore native plant community, achieve biodiversity, create a low-maintenance landscape, and improve storm water quality and quantity. The natural planting zone create habitat for migrating birds, beneficial insects, and amphibious species, connecting to existing contiguous vegetated system extends wildlife corridors across the site boundaries. This new patch of habitat is linked to nearby woodland and wetland open space areas.Woodland restoration can also improve surrounding areas by creating privacy buffers and sound attenuation. It is also benefits a site by providing spatial interest and a sense of place by using native, indigenous species and plant community.
  • Easton’s resident project

    1. 1. Easton’s Resident ProjectTowards a sustainable site
    2. 2. Easton’s Resident ProjectTowards a sustainable site
    3. 3. Project Objective1. Divide & reorganize space2. Increase water infiltration andImprove storm-watermanagement3. Develop a natural landscapematrix4. Increase social capital withfood productionTowards a sustainable site
    4. 4. Dividing Space1Towards a sustainable site
    5. 5. Dividing Space• Maximize space usability & improve traffic flow.• Improve user experience and connection tonature.1Towards a sustainable site1. Divide space into small segmentsto create a clear inviting walkwayand a partial enclosed outdoorgathering space.2. Maximize space usability &improve traffic flow.3. Improve user experience andconnection to nature.
    6. 6. Site needsTowards a sustainable siteOpen amenity space forentertaining and gatheringFood production forcommunity aroundIntimate space for reflectionand contemplationNatural space to increaseuser engagementHabitat for biodiversity
    7. 7. Site PlanTowards a sustainable site
    8. 8. Open amenity spaceTowards a sustainable siteOutdoor IndoorOutdoor PatioOutdoor GreenSpaceConnecting outdoorand indoor patiospaceOutdoor
    9. 9. Small Intimate spaceTowards a sustainable site
    10. 10. Natural spaceTowards a sustainable site
    11. 11. Food ProductionTowards a sustainable site
    12. 12. Site FlowTowards a sustainable site
    13. 13. MaterialTowards a sustainable sitePermeable pavementPermeable pavementInterlock brickRecycled concreteAggregateGeotextile retainingwall systemBark Mulch Path
    14. 14. Water ManagementIncrease permeable and vegetative surface forwater infiltration and groundwater recharge.2Towards a sustainable site
    15. 15. Site HydrologyTowards a sustainable site
    16. 16. Rainwater HarvestingTowards a sustainable siteRain barrelRain chainRain barrel hooked upwith drip system forvegetable bed belowRain Barrel withoverflow hose direct torain garden below
    17. 17. Water FiltrationTurbid and Clean Storm Water
    18. 18. Rain Garden & BioswaleTowards a sustainable siteRain gardens for frontyard & 1st tier ofbackyard•Vegetatedtrapezoidal shapebioswale pondingarea•Increase waterretention time,increase pollutantsremoval efficiency
    19. 19. Rain Garden & BioswaleTowards a sustainable siteVegetatedtrapezoidalshape bioswaleponding area•Native uplandplant species•Year-roundvegetative cover•Erosion andtemperaturecontrol•Native wetlandplant species•Biofiltervegetation•Dense cover,fibrous root orrhizomestructure, andupright growthform
    20. 20. natural landscapeDevelop a natural landscape matrix, create smallerpatches of cultural landscape space within thelarger matrixes of natural landscape spaces tominimize inputs and maximize ecological function.3Towards a sustainable site
    21. 21. Plant CommunityTowards a sustainable site
    22. 22. Vegetated StripTowards a sustainable siteNative full-sun orpart-sun shrubs•Osmaroniacerasiformis (Osoberry)•Symphoricarposalbus (Snowberry)Larger shrubs andnative ground coverSalix scouleriana(Scouler Willow)Malus FuscaPhysocarpus capitatusGround cover:Oxalis oreganaAsarum caudatum
    23. 23. Vegetated StripTowards a sustainable siteFull sun nativeCornus stoloniferaRedosier Dogwood•Lonicerainvolcrata BlackTwinberry•Rosa nutkana(Nootka Rose)•Sambucusracemosa (RedElderberry)•Rubus spectabilis(samon berry)•Petasites frigidus(Arctic Butterbur)Ground cover and fast growing erosioncontrolCornus canadensisGaultheria procumbensAndromeda polifolia (Bog Rosemary)
    24. 24. Vegetation swaleTowards a sustainable site• Epilobium densiflorum(Dense Spike-Primrose)• Carex obnupta (SloughSedge)• Hypericum anagalloides (BogSt. John’s- Wort)• Mimulus guttatus (CommonMonkeyflower)• Eleocharis palustris(CreepingSpikerush)• Lysichiton americanus (skunkcarbagge)• Oplopanax horridus (Devil’sclub)• Ribes lacustre (Black swampgooseberry )• Crataegus douglasii (BlackHawthorn )

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