Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience
Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience
Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience
Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience
Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience
Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience
Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience
Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience
Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience
Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience
Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience
Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience
Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience
Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience
Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Re-Imagining the Low-Income Student Experience

136

Published on

A creative look at Furman University and how the work-study program can be restructured to provide additional support for the low-income student demographic.

A creative look at Furman University and how the work-study program can be restructured to provide additional support for the low-income student demographic.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
136
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Re-Imagining The Low-Income Student Experience USING THE FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAM TO INSPIRE AN IMAGINATIVE AND ENGAGING CAMPUS COMMUNITY ROSEMARY HILLIARD CREATED FOR RETENTION & ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES EDU 6220 70504 19 OCTOBER 2012
  • 2. Problem: COMPARED WITH 56 PERCENT OF THEIR HIGH-INCOME PEERS, ONLY 26 PERCENT OF LOW-INCOME STUDENTS WHO ENROLL IN FOUR-YEAR PROGRAMS SUCCESSFULLY EARN THEIR DEGREES. (ENGSTROM AND TINTOM, 2008)
  • 3. Problem: STUDENTS FROM LOW-INCOME BACKGROUNDS OFTEN HAVE WORK AND FAMILY OBLIGATIONS THAT HINDER ENGAGEMENT AND CONTRIBUTE TO RETENTION PROBLEMS. (LONGWELL-GRICE AND LONGWELL-GRICE, 2008)
  • 4. Solution: CREATE AN INTENSIVE COMMUNITY DESIGNED AROUND THE CAMPUS WORKSTUDY PROGRAM DESIGNED TO ADDRESS THE NEEDS OF LOW-INCOME STUDENTS WHILE SUPPORTING THE UNIVERSITY’S COMMITMENT TO EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING AND COMMUNITY SERVICE.
  • 5. Why Work-Study?  WS provides students with the opportunity to bridge their learning from the classroom into practical, real-life situations while introducing them to the workplace. (Kuh, Kinzie, Schuh, and Whitt, 2005, pg. 48)  Participating in a WS program may positively influence a student’s desire and/or ability to persist in college. (Braxton, Hirschy, and McClendon, 2005, pg. 36-37)  “Students employed on-campus have a substantially higher rate of persistence into their second year.” (Cermak and Filkins, 2004)
  • 6.  “Furman has emerged as a national leader Furman University - Greenville, SC - Private, liberal arts - 2,662 undergraduate enrollment - 90% retention rate - Cost of Attendance for 13-14: $54,448 - 38.8% of students receive need-based financial aid - All students required to live on-campus (“Facts and Figures, 2013) among liberal arts colleges by giving students the chance to learn by doing through independent study, research projects with professors, study abroad, community service and internships around the nation and the world. Furman is a leader among liberal arts colleges in the percentage of students who engage in undergraduate research during the summer; the university supports student research and internships both on and offcampus, including overseas opportunities. One of Furman's major strategic goals is its commitment to sustainability made evident in the University's curriculum, construction projects, and promotion of community awareness of sustainability.” (“Furman University,” 2013)
  • 7. Furman: A Financial Picture  53% of students apply for need-based financial aid  30.9% of students’ financial need is fully met  For the rest, an average of 72.9% need is met  Based on the $54,448 13-14 COA, this leaves an average of $14,755 to be covered out-of-pocket, through expensive loans, or through other means  Average debt is $27,373 (higher than national $ 26,000 average) (Furman University, 2013)
  • 8.  2009 Poverty Figures for Greenville, South Carolina 2009 poverty figures indicate an area of high-need families.      Greenville, SC: 31.5% residents live below the poverty line 22.4% state of SC below poverty line 37.3% of female and 30.3% of males aged 18-24 live below poverty level 11.4% of 18-24 year old residents qualify as “very poor” (“Greenville South Carolina,” 2009)
  • 9. Introducing WORK/CONNECT. A WORK-STUDY PROGRAM THAT PROVIDES FINANCIALLY-NEEDY UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS WITH THE CHANCE TO ENGAGE IN VALUABLE WORK EXPERIENCE WHILE ENRICHING THE SURROUNDING COMMUNITY.
  • 10. WORK/CONNECT: Who  All undergraduate students with an estimated family contribution of $0, as        determined by the financial aid office, will be eligible to participate. Required GPA of 3.0 indicates ability to manage work/study schedule and maintains “elite” status of program. Available freshman through senior year. Wages will be based on length of participation in the program. For example, year 1 participants make $10/hour, year 2 $13, year 3 $16, and year 4 $20. Wages should be higher than with other FWS jobs available on-campus. Students are grouped in teams that are then assigned work opportunities in the city of Greenville. Teams are integrated vertically: fourth-year members lead lowerclassmen. Student leadership component encourages participants to “develop leadership abilities, polish communication skills, and learn firsthand about group dynamics [through collaboration] with other student leaders and faculty.” (Kuh, Kinzie, Schuh, and Whitt, 2005, pg. 250) Collaborative groups encourage learning and mutual dependency on each team member. (Tinto, 2002)
  • 11. WORK/CONNECT: Where  Examples of jobs include staffing the offices of local non-profit organizations, such as food banks, homeless shelters, tutoring at public schools, and community centers.  Preferred assignments will be those that help lowincome and disadvantaged community of Greenville.  Jobs will focus on connection with Greenville community and improving the lives of all involved.  Local organizations seeking assistance apply with Furman Work-Study Office for approval.
  • 12. WORK/CONNECT: How  Experiential learning that enriches campus and community environments. (Kuh, Kinzie, Schuh, and Whitt, 2005, pg. 236)  Assignments/hiring decisions made by Furman Work-Study Office  FWS funds administered by Financial Aid  Challenges in meeting program need?
  • 13. WORK/CONNECT: Why  WORK/CONNECT aims to decrease low-income student reliance     on loans and other means of covering aid gap. WORK/CONNECT will be funded primarily through FWS, thereby relieving the school and selected organizations of financial burden. WORK/CONNECT will increase student retention by providing meaningful and enriching work-study jobs in the community and removing students from sheltered campus environment. WORK/CONNECT will increase applications and enrollment at Furman by providing community visibility and positive reinforcement of the university’s mission statement. WORK/CONNECT will enhance university marketing strategies by demonstrating support for low-income population and alternative methods of lowering the all-powerful sticker price. (Lapovsky, 1999)
  • 14. Closing thought “THE FUTURE OF OUR COUNTRY DEPENDS ON OPENING FINANCIAL PATHWAYS FOR ALL STUDENTS TO ATTEND THE COLLEGES WHERE THEY ARE MOST LIKELY TO THRIVE.” (BARASH, 2013)
  • 15. References             Barash, C. (2013, September). How can we expand college access to low-income students? Reuters. Retrieved 15 October, 2013 from http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/09/04/how-can-we-expand-college-access-to-low-incomestudents/. Braxton, J.; Hirschy, A.; McClendon, S. (2005). Understanding and reducing college student departure. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, 30(3). Hoboken: Wiley. Cermak, K.; Filkins, J. (2004, February). On-Campus Employment as a Factor of Student Retention and Graduation. DePaul University. Retrieved 15 October, 2013 from http://oipr.depaul.edu/open/gradereten/oce.asp. Facts and Figures. (2013). Furman University. Retrieved 15 October from www.furman.edu. Furman University. (2013) U.S. News and World Report. Retrieved 15 October from http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com. Greenville South Carolina Poverty Rate Data. (2009). City-Data. Retrieved 15 October from http://www.city-data.com/. Kuh, G.; Kinzie, J.; Schuh, J.; Whitt, E. (2005). Student success in college: Creating conditions that matter. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Lapovsky, L. (1999, Fall). What you need to know about enrollment management. New Directions for Higher Education. 107. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Longwell-Grice, R.; Longwell-Grice, H. (2008). Testing tinto: How do retention theories work for first-generation, working class students? Journal of College Student Retention, 9(4). pg. 407-420. Retrieved from www.hartnell.edu/bsi/Research/Testing%20Tinto's%20theory.pdf. Reese, D. (2013, May). Sequester hits work-study funds and impacts this family. Washington Post. Retrieved 16 October 2013 from http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/she-the-people/wp/2013/05/29/sequester-hits-work-study-funds-andimpacts-this-family/. Tinto, V. (2002). Taking student retention seriously: Rethinking the first year of college. Speech presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers, 15 April 2002. Minneapolis. Williams, C. (2013, August). The american dream should really be called the american debt. The Guardian. Retrieved 15 October, 2013 from http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/27/student-loan-debt-cripple-young-americans.

×