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The Life And Work Of Harriet Beecher Stowe

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  • 1. The Life and Work of Harriet Beecher Stowe Brenda Rosario
  • 2. Background
    • Harriet Beecher Stowe was born on June 14, 1811 in Litchfield, Connecticut
    • Harriet became:
    • Teacher, at Hartford Female Academy
    • Active abolitionist
    • An American Novelist
      • Wrote articles, essays, and stories
      • Known for her famous novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”
  • 3. Family
    • The seventh child of Roxanna Beecher and Reverend Lyman Beecher
    • Father, Reverend Lyman Beecher
      • A fiery, Evangelical Calvinist
    • Mother, Roxanna Beecher
      • Died when Harriet was 4 years old
    • Three sisters:
      • Catherine Esther, Mary Foote, and Harriet
    • Five brothers:
      • William Henry, Edward, George, Henry Ward, and Charles
    • Sister, Catherine Beecher
      • Oldest child
      • Took care of the children after the death of Roxanna
      • Founded school for girls, “Hartford Female Seminary”
      • Started a school in Cincinnati, “Western Female Institute”
  • 4. Education
    • After the death of Harriet’s mother, Harriet was sent to live with her highly religious Aunt Harriet Foote,
      • Harriet:
        • Learned the catechism
        • Read her prayer book
        • Read the Bible
        • Read works by Samuel Johnson
        • Read Arabian Nights
    • Harriet became a devoted reader and a proficient writer
    • Harriet attended:
      • Ma’ma Kilbourn’s school
        • for five years
      • Litchfield Academy
        • Won an award at the age of 12
        • Essay, “Can the Immortality of the Soul be Proved by the Light of Nature?”
      • Hartford Female Seminary
        • Enrolled in sister, Catherine’s school
          • Learned: composition, Italian, French, Latin, natural and mechanical science, ethics, logic and mathematics
  • 5. Connecticut to Ohio
    • Harriet lived in:
    • Connecticut, Hartford (North)
      • Hartford Female Seminary
        • Attended as a student at age 12
        • Worked as an assistant teacher at age 16
    • Ohio, Cincinnati (near South)
      • Western Female Institute
        • Father, Reverend Lyman was promoted and moved family to Cincinnati
        • Sister, Catherine started school
        • Harriet became a teacher
        • Started writing professionally
          • Co-wrote a geography textbook with her sister
          • Wrote and sold several stories
  • 6. Marriage and Family
    • Harriet married Calvin Ellis Stowe
      • Widow
      • Clergyman
      • Professor at Harriet’s Father’s theological seminary
    • Harriet and Calvin had seven children:
      • Twin daughters; Eliza Taylor and Harriet
      • Henry Ellis
      • Fredrick William
      • Georgiana May
      • Samuel Charles “Charley”
        • Died from cholera as an infant
      • Charles Edward
  • 7. The Reality of Slavery
    • Cincinnati is where Harriet started to see slavery for the first time
    • Viewed it in Kentucky, a slave state
    • Met escaped slaves and heard stories of their horrifying treatment and desperate difficulties for freedom
    • While at church, Harriet had a vision of Uncle Tom’s Death and then went home and started to write her book
    • Harriet began researching slavery, interviewing fugitive slaves, slaves owners, and read several books
  • 8. Fugitive Slave Law of 1850
    • Passed by the United States Congress on September 18, 1850
    • Compromise between the southern slave-holding and the northern free-slaves
    • Declared was forced that all runaway slaves be brought back to their masters from the free states
    • Against the law to help runaway slaves
    • Law was rarely enforced because the northern states were against slavery
  • 9. Uncle Tom’s Cabin
    • Written in 1852
    • Best-selling novel in the world
    • Translated into different languages
    • Sold in the U.S. alone
      • 10,000 in the first week
      • 300,000 in the first year
      • 500,000 in the first 5 years
    • Based and inspired on an autobiography of Josiah Henson, a black man who lived and worked on a 3,700 acre tobacco plantation in North Bethesda, Maryland owned by Isaac Riley
    • Based on interviews with escaped slaves in Cincinnati across the Ohio River from Kentucky
    • Important themes
      • The evil and immorality of slavery
      • The moral power and sanctity of women
      • Christianity, Religion and Faith
  • 10. Conflict and Controversy
    • Uncle Tom’s Cabin had an amazing effect on the northern states of America
    • It divided the northern and southern states
    • South denied the book’s true life events of the south
    • South felt insulted by the accusations
    • Uncle Tom’s Cabin was banned in the southern states
    • If anyone was found with the book in the south he or she would be arrested
    • Lead to the Civil War of 1861
  • 11. Harriet’s Literary Works
    • Wrote for the Western Monthly Magazine, won a writing contest
    • Also wrote articles, essays, and stories for The Atlantic Monthly, New York Evangelist, the Independent, and the Christian Union
    • The Mayflower , 1843
    • Uncle Tom’s Cabin , 1852
    • The Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin , 1853
    • Sunny Memories , 1854
    • Dred: A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp , 1856
    • Our Charley , 1858
    • A Minister’s Wooling , 1859
    • The Pearl of Orr’s Island , 1862
    • Little Foxes , 1865
    • Nina Gordon (Formerly ‘Dred’), 1866
    • Religious Poems, 1867
    • Queer Little People, 1867
    • The Chimney Corner , 1868
  • 12. Harriet’s Literary Works
    • Men of Our Times , 1868
    • Old-Town Folks , 1869
    • Little Pussy Willow , 1870
    • Pink and White Tyranny , 1871
    • Old Town Fireside Stories , 1871
    • My Wife and I, 1872
    • Palmetto Leaves , 1873
    • We and Our Neighbors , 1875
    • Betty’s Bright Idea , 1876
    • Footsteps of the Master , 1877
    • Bible Heroines , 1878
    • Poganuc People , 1878
    • Dog’s Mission, 1880
  • 13. American Legacy
    • Harriet’s work reflect the great issues and events of her century:
      • slavery
      • women's position in society
      • the decline of Calvinism
      • the rise of industry and consumerism
      • the birth of a great national literature
    • Harriet’s mental abilities failed in 1888, two years after the death of her husband
    • Harriet died on July 1, 1896 in Hartford, Connecticut
    • “ My dear, you must be a literary women. It is so written in the book of fate. Make all your calculations accordingly”
            • Calvin Stowe
  • 14. Sources and Pictures
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harriet_Beecher_Stowe
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncle_Tom’s_Cabin
    • http://www.online-literature.com/stowe/
    • http://www.classicreader.com/author.php/aut.179/
    • http://www.answers.com/topic/harriet-beecher-stowe
    • http://www.yahoopics/harriet_beecher...we.jpg
    • http://www.yahoopics/stowe-crop.jpg
    • http://www.yahoopics/Harriet-Beecher...we.jpg