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Nuvi social media strategy
 

Nuvi social media strategy

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NUVI presentation from Dave Oldham from the first lecture

NUVI presentation from Dave Oldham from the first lecture

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    Nuvi social media strategy Nuvi social media strategy Presentation Transcript

    • 1
    • a tool for social media listening, analytics, & engagement that runs in a browser 2NUVI is a real-time analytics platform for social media. We make social conversations on the web actionable and insightful using elegant dashboards and uniquevisualizations. NUVI runs in modern browsers so there is nothing to install, no servers to manage.
    • visual intelligence platform social analytics in the cloud 3Other ways you could describe NUVI
    • 4NUVI was born out of a digital creative agency called STRUCK. At STRUCK, we were fortunate to work on some great creative projects, with some great brands.
    • 5Pepsi was one of those brands. Their Gatorade brand family wanted to build a social media “Mission Control” center.
    • 6STRUCK worked with Gatorade and other technology platforms to create Mission Control. STRUCK developed the real-time data visualization layer that madesense of all the data they were analyzing.
    • 7Mission Control got a lot of publicity. Companies started calling STRUCK, wanting us to help them create something similar. So instead of creating customsolutions one at a time, we took what we learned from the Gatorade project, created a spin-off company, and started building a brand new platform from scratch.NUVI was born!
    • 8When we were working with Gatorade, their objectives were to monitor what people were saying about them online, gain new product insights, measure thesocial impact of their traditional forms of advertising and marketing, become a thought leader in their market category, and engage with consumers in real-timeon a personalized level. We learned a lot about creating programs and the technology to support these types of business objectives.But what if you’re not Gatorade? What if your clients aren’t a popular consumer-facing brand? What role does social media play in an organization that doesn’tTweet, doesn’t have a Facebook page, or a YouTube channel?
    • 60% vs 8% 82% monitoring 48% ROI measurements 9Social media is beginning to impact every business, not just consumer-facing brands. In fact, an industry analyst report back in April 26, 2010 claimed that of theFortune 100, those businesses that used social media intelligence increased their revenue and growth by 60% (in 2009) versus just 8% for businesses that didnot use social media. And a more recent report by the Altimeter group stated that 82% of corporations they surveyed expected to have a brand monitoringsolution in place by the end of that year (2011), while 48% reported that their primary internal focus was to develop ROI measurements for social media.
    • 10The world is simply becoming more social. This photo was taken in 2005 near the Vatican as Benedict was announced as the new pope. Take a good look...
    • 11This photo was taken in nearly the same place, this year with the announcement of Francis as the new pope.
    • LEADERSHIP ENGAGEMENT LISTENING 12It’s our observation that companies move through three stages of social media maturity. Listening, Engagement, and Leadership. In this presentation I want tofocus mainly on phase 1, Listening - because regardless of what type of company you are or what market you operate in, you can benefit tremendously fromsocial media if you will simply start by listening.
    • LEADERSHIP ENGAGEMENT LISTENING 13It’s our observation that companies move through three general stages of social media maturity, or social intelligence. Listening, Engagement, and Leadership. Inthis presentation I want to focus mainly on phase 1, Listening - because regardless of what type of company you are or what market you operate in, you canbenefit tremendously from social media if you will simply start by Listening.
    • Public Relations Product Customer Development Support Social Competition Intelligence Purchase Intent Marketing Brand & Advertising Influence 14Understanding how social intelligence plays a role within your organization is very important. Social media is permeating every market segment and impactingevery aspect of modern business. Social intelligence is becoming an integral part of successful companies.
    • 15It might be true that no one is talking about your company or your products or your executive team in social media, especially if you haven’t given them anythingto talk about. But there are people talking about your industry and its environmental and economic factors, your competitors and their products (or service), orrelated industries (supply or distribution) that all impact your brand. In social media, not listening because you are not posting content is like not watching orreading the news just because you weren’t in it.
    • Listen Observe Learn 16It is therefore critical to learn how to use social media to listen, observe, and learn everything you can about the types of conversations taking place that impactthe future of your organization.
    • 17If you have been asking yourself “What should we say?” you are putting the cart before the horse. You should be asking yourself, “what should we listen for?”Too often we see clients who have rushed into social media “publishing” because they felt they needed a Facebook page or Twitter handle. It’s very much likethe internet boom when everyone felt like they needed a website, but most didn’t know what to do with one.
    • Information is power Knowledge Capacity Knowledge Transfer 18Information is power. The more you know and the faster you know it, the faster you can make an intelligent decision as to your next move. Knowledge Capacityand Knowledge Transfer (explain a little bit about what that means - Paul Gustavson (friend, advisor) exposed us to this idea).
    • X Brand Semiconductor 197 “mentions” per month Semiconductor Technology 7,721 mentions/mo 19Example from one of our clients in a B2B, typical “non-social” setting. There weren’t a lot of conversations taking place each month specific to their brand byname. However, when we showed them the conversation taking place in their broader industry it became a lot more interesting. Insights from this broaderlistening yielded insights about who the main Influencers are leading the conversations (competitors, partners, analysts and bloggers, their own employees,potential hires, and educators). It revealed trending topics, innovative breakthroughs, and new research efforts being shared in real-time which impacted theirresearch and development strategy, their distribution channels, and their marketing messaging.
    • 20The conversation about their brand only, looked like this. This view is over several days... a low enough volume of conversation that you could probably readeach mention or social post individually each day.
    • 21The conversation about their industry, however, looked like this. Notice this is over a narrow timeframe (a few hours) and is way too much conversation to readevery mention. And, when you visualize the conversation like this, interesting sentiment and influence patterns appear.
    • 22Another B2B customer in the food distribution industry had nearly no conversations in social media about their specific brand. However, the conversation in theirindustry space was much more interesting and revealing...
    • IF the conversation volume is low, YOU have a clear chance to LEAD 23And, if Listening reveals that there just isn’t anyone taking a thought leadership position in your industry in social media, YOU have the perfect opportunity toassume that role, which will give you a unique competitive advantage. We’ve found that if you listen long enough, what you should talk about will becomeabundantly clear through the conversations and questions already taking place.
    • Benefits of Listening: Access Velocity Accuracy 24The benefits of real-time Listening for your organization: Access (anyone can use the tool, web and mobile browser not binders in an exec’s office), Velocity(traditional market research is still useful but takes time to plan, execute, and analyze and market conditions can shift in that time period), Accuracy (trendschange, traditional research has a short shelf life... real-time social data is always fresh).
    • Knowledge Capacity, Knowledge Transfer Monitoring Measurement Analysis Reporting 25As I mentioned earlier, the secret to success in today’s social world is the ability for a company to ingest information and collectively learn from it (knowledgecapacity) and then act intelligently upon it (knowledge transfer). In social media, there are four components to this... monitoring, measurement, analysis, andreporting. We’ve already shown you a few quick examples of monitoring. Let’s take a look at Measurement.
    • #Applebees100K 26Measurement focuses on assigning values and hard numbers to any point of interest relating to social media. Start with your business objectives (what do youwant to learn? How does it fit into your organization’s specific goals?) and work your way back into metrics that support these objectives.(show real dashboard here?)
    • 27How do you stack up against your competitors in key areas of Measurement?
    • 28Analysis is the interpretation of the data once it has been measured and quantified. The objective of analysis is to draw actionable insights out of the data. Don’tbe afraid if the data tells you that you are currently failing to meet your objectives or that your competitors are much more socially advanced than you are. If youonly draw the conclusions you wanted to get, you won’t improve in the areas where you’re falling short.Analyze the trending categories of conversation over specific time periods to understand what your audience / peers care most about.
    • 29Analyze conversations from a geographic perspective to identify localized problems or opportunities, and to inform geographically-driven sales, marketing, orcustomer support initiatives.
    • 30The final component of Measurement is Reporting.
    • 31One element of the Business Wire - NUVI partnership is automated social media reports that can be purchased in conjunction with a press release distribution.The Social Landscape report gives you an overview of the important social measurements for 7 days after your press release has been sent out.
    • 32Reports are the deliverables that put all the data into digestable, actionable chunks for your stakeholders (whether they be clients if you’re an agency orexecutives or peers if you’re inside a company). The right tool will make it easy for you to share the most important data with others without having to spend a lotof time compiling the content - time spent here should be focused on drawing conclusions and sharing insights with various teams within your organization).
    • Best Practices for Listening ✦ Identify your specific business objectives ✦ Identify the most important ?s to answer ✦ Set up alerts if you can’t monitor 24/7 ✦ Look at Industry, Competitors, Environment ✦ Share insights with stakeholders often 33As I mentioned earlier, the secret to success in today’s social world is the ability for a company to ingest information and collectively learn from it (knowledgecapacity) and then act intelligently upon it (knowledge transfer). In social media, there are four components to this... monitoring, measurement, analysis, andreporting. We’ve already shown you a few quick examples of monitoring. Let’s take a look at Measurement.
    • “PR departments now need to shift from a predominantly outbound, messaging-based core practice to one that emphasizes 24/7 monitoring, rapid response, online reputation management, and digital crisis management.” -Olivier Blanchard, Social Media ROI 34As I mentioned earlier, the secret to success in today’s social world is the ability for a company to ingest information and collectively learn from it (knowledgecapacity) and then act intelligently upon it (knowledge transfer). In social media, there are four components to this... monitoring, measurement, analysis, andreporting. We’ve already shown you a few quick examples of monitoring. Let’s take a look at Measurement.
    • 35Q&A