Ripple Effect: Faculty Redesign Through Course Redesign
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Ripple Effect: Faculty Redesign Through Course Redesign

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The Writing Initiative at Passaic County Community College has a primary goal of improving writing by redesigning more than 20 GenEd courses across disciplines as writing-intensive. An embedded ...

The Writing Initiative at Passaic County Community College has a primary goal of improving writing by redesigning more than 20 GenEd courses across disciplines as writing-intensive. An embedded component of the project is the use of technology by the faculty and students participating in the WI courses. A secondary goal is to expand the number of other instructors integrating technology into their courses – to start a ripple effect in the college community.

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Ripple Effect: Faculty Redesign Through Course Redesign Presentation Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. Presentation available at http://www.slideshare.net/ronko4
  • 3.
    • New technologies rise and fall so quickly that it is increasingly difficult to keep faculty updated on tools that make a difference in the classroom.
    Jim Rapoza - http://etech.eweek.com
  • 4. How do we encourage faculty to try new technologies in the classroom?
  • 5.  
  • 6.
    • The Writing Initiative at Passaic County Community College has a primary goal of improving writing by redesigning more than 20 GenEd courses across disciplines as writing-intensive.
      • 2007-2012
  • 7.
    • An embedded component of the project is the use of technology by the faculty and students participating in the WI courses.
  • 8.
    • A secondary goal is to expand the number of other instructors integrating technology into their courses – to start a ripple effect in the college community.
  • 9.
    • Formal faculty development in…
      • collaboratively creating digital content that is shared with other instructors
      • online assessments
      • lecture capture (Echo360)
      • streaming media
      • e-portfolios
      • e-tutoring
      • online scheduling
      • promoting the use of the college portal (CampusCruiser) and LMS (Blackboard)
      • These courses are online, blended, and face-to-face on three campuses.
  • 10. A Taxonomy – ordered classification
    • Technology infusion from the perspective of learner cognition.
    • Scaffolding increasingly higher level thinking and integration skills
    • http://www.edtechinnovators.com
  • 11. from top to bottom increasingly higher level thinking and integration skills resulting in increased expectation of independence Designed for students. Being used for faculty.
  • 12. Choosing The Tools
  • 13. What IS Emerging Technology?
  • 14.  
  • 15. http://pccc.libguides.com
  • 16. LibGuides Guide Index
    • There are 154 guides in the system: 5 private, 73 published, and 76 unpublished guides.
    • Of the 78 active Guides, 8 were developed for WI courses currently launched…
  • 17.
    • Observe
    • Incorporate
    • Produce
    • Explore
    • Collaborate
    • Apply
    • Create
    • Demonstrations of the technology at workshops, faculty institutes, Dean’s Tea, best practices, department meetings…
  • 18.
    • Observe
    • Incorporate
    • Produce
    • Explore
    • Collaborate
    • Apply
    • Create
    • Incorporating a tool – passive use of technology in a Web 1.0 way.
      • Using media, LibGuides, assigning the use of eTutoring…
  • 19.
    • Observe
    • Incorporate
    • Produce
    • Explore
    • Collaborate
    • Apply
    • Create
    • Production - going 2.0
      • Making your own content
      • After first faculty institute
  • 20.
    • Observe
    • Incorporate
    • Produce
    • Explore
    • Collaborate
    • Apply
    • Create
    • Exploring new technology on their own.
      • Photography blogs as critical thinking.
  • 21.
    • Observe
    • Incorporate
    • Produce
    • Explore
    • Collaborate
    • Apply
    • Create
    • Collaborating with students, librarians and our mentors.
      • Handing off WI courses to instructors for additional sections.
      • “ Open sourcing” the content
  • 22.
    • Observe
    • Incorporate
    • Produce
    • Explore
    • Collaborate
    • Apply
    • Create
    • Combining and integrating technologies.
    • Mashups
      • Video produced embedded in LibGuides
      • Portfolios as CMS; faculty portfolios
  • 23.
    • Observe
    • Incorporate
    • Produce
    • Explore
    • Collaborate
    • Apply
    • Create
    • Using the technology to produce new and different content or results.
      • Media as anthology
      • Guides used for non-class purposes
  • 24.
    • Bloom’s Taxonomy
    • A Digital Bloom’s Taxonomy
    • http://www.serendipity35.net/index.php?/archives/1709-A-Digital-Bloom.html
  • 25.
    • As with any learning taxonomy…
      • Higher levels do not occur without the “lower” levels being used first.
      • Lower levels are not a negative label.
      • It is best when progress is made to higher levels because of self-identified needs.
      • Students can be powerful drivers for faculty adoption.
      • Participants need to explore on their own, abandon what does not work for them, try things that do not work for others.
  • 26. [email_address] http://www.slideshare.net/ronko4
  • 27.  
  • 28.