Engaging Learners Across Time and Space Models for Distance Learning Mary Davis, Director, Online & Distance Learning, Col...
As you get seated... Point your mobile device or web browser to: http://z.umn.edu/educause2011 and answer our questions.  ...
Overview <ul><ul><li>If you’ve not already done so, please answer our ChimeIn questions at http://z.umn.edu/educause. </li...
Introduction Let's begin with a controversial statement:
Introduction Let's begin with a controversial statement: Learning in a digital space, either fully online or blended with ...
Move to online is being driven by...
Introduction Let's make a less controversial statement:
Introduction Let's make a less controversial statement: Learning in a digital space, when structured thoughtfully and base...
Introduction <ul><li>Don't believe us? Let the science speak for itself... </li></ul><ul><ul><li>DOE meta-analysis of onli...
Introduction Given these statements... ...the questions around online learning are transitioning from &quot;will we?&quot;...
Introduction of the Model <ul><li>What we'll discuss: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Programmatic model, rather than just an instru...
Introduction of the Model <ul><li>Loosely based on an ADDIE model: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Analyze market, create mission/vi...
Introduction of the Model
Introduction of the Model
Introduction of the Model
College of Continuing Education STEP 1: Market Analysis, Defining Audience and Mission and Vision   Mission: Provide high ...
College of Continuing Education
College of Continuing Education STEP 2: Identifying Courses for Build or Conversion   Academic program curricular prioriti...
College of Continuing Education <ul><li>STEP 3: Design </li></ul><ul><li>    </li></ul><ul><li>Design team: instructor + I...
College of Continuing Education <ul><li>STEP 4: Production </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enterprise systems + ...
College of Continuing Education <ul><li>STEP 5: Quality Control </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Checklist-driven...
College of Continuing Education <ul><li>STEP 6: Delivery </li></ul><ul><li>SUPPORT STRUCTURE:  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></...
College of Continuing Education <ul><li>STEP 7: Evaluation and Iteration </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Post-in...
College of Pharmacy STEP 1: Defining Mission and Vision and Identifying Audience and Potential Markets Vision and mission ...
College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 1: Defining Mission and Vision and Identifying Audience and Potential Markets </li></ul><...
College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 2: Identifying Courses for Build or Conversion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Individual faculty p...
College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 3: Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ID team exposes and agrees upon their design epistemologi...
College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 3: Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Map not only to learning goals, but also to accreditation...
College of Pharmacy STEP 4: Production
College of Pharmacy STEP 4: Production
College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 4.5: Marketing and Enrolling Students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Non-traditional students tax ...
College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 5: Quality Control </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Guiding principle: cognitive load (van Merriënbo...
College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 6: Delivery model </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Faculty <--> course coordinator <--> students. </...
College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 7: Evaluation and Iteration </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul>...
UNITE STEP 1: Mission, Audience, History    “ UNITE Distributed Learning is dedicated to providing continuing educational ...
UNITE STEP 2: Identifying Courses     Main focus is on graduate level courses for Electrical Engineering, Computer Science...
UNITE STEP 3: Design   Past dictates practice   Goal is to accommodate faculty teaching styles     Building upon F2F secti...
UNITE STEPS 4-5-6: Production, Delivery & Quality Control   Eight Classrooms (smallest seats 40, largest seats 240):   • U...
UNITE <ul><li>STEPS 4-5-6: Production, Delivery & Quality Control </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Class sessions are...
UNITE  
UNITE STEPS 4-5-6: Production, Delivery & Quality Control   Archives available until end-of-semester    TAs and F2F studen...
UNITE  
UNITE STEP 7: Evaluation and Iteration   Tools added in collaboration with faculty needs and student requests   Technical ...
UNITE STEP 7: Evaluation and Iteration   “ The availability of delayed video-on-demand webcasts and/or downloadable podcas...
Comparison/Contrast Programs Audience and Mission Choose courses Design Production Quality Control Delivery Evaluation CCE...
Key Conclusions and Takeaways <ul><ul><li>Overall: Form follows function </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>STEP 1: Mission, Vison...
Key Conclusions and Takeaways <ul><ul><li>STEP 3: Design (cont.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Emphasize three A's (activ...
Key Conclusions and Takeaways <ul><ul><li>STEP 5: Quality Control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Leave time to &quot;kick ...
Conclusions Takeaways <ul><ul><li>Be realistic about ability to build up capacity and new programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul>...
Contact us!  <ul><li>We love talking about this stuff! Please feel free to get in touch. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mary Davis,...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Educause 2011 Bridging The Distance Across Time and Space

540 views
495 views

Published on

Presentation from 2011 Educause Conference (Philadelphia).

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
540
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Established in 1913, and approaching its 100th anniversary, the College of Continuing Education is one of the most diverse of the University of Minnesota’s 19 colleges and schools.   The College’s primary audience is adult learners; our mission is to provide high-quality continuing education and lifelong learning opportunities for professional development, personal enrichment, career transitions, and academic growth.   Each year, the College serves more than 50,000 learners working toward individualized or applied degrees or certificates; accessing the University&apos;s credit courses; or participating in short courses, workshops and events.    Through fully online and distance courses, the College of Continuing Education helps make University of Minnesota courses accessible to students not admitted to the University and to admitted students wanting to supplement their course work with flexible options.   Providing access to University education through distance learning options has been core to CCE’s mission for decades.  Meeting the curricular needs of CCE academic programs is a top strategic priority.  We respond to the identified priorities of each program as they are defined by faculty advisors working with program directors and informed by continual market tracking from the college’s market research department.
  • Established in 1913, and approaching its 100th anniversary, the College of Continuing Education is one of the most diverse of the University of Minnesota’s 19 colleges and schools.   The College’s primary audience is adult learners; our mission is to provide high-quality continuing education and lifelong learning opportunities for professional development, personal enrichment, career transitions, and academic growth.   Each year, the College serves more than 50,000 learners working toward individualized or applied degrees or certificates; accessing the University&apos;s credit courses; or participating in short courses, workshops and events.    Through fully online and distance courses, the College of Continuing Education helps make University of Minnesota courses accessible to students not admitted to the University and to admitted students wanting to supplement their course work with flexible options.   Providing access to University education through distance learning options has been core to CCE’s mission for decades.  Meeting the curricular needs of CCE academic programs is a top strategic priority.  We respond to the identified priorities of each program as they are defined by faculty advisors working with program directors and informed by continual market tracking from the college’s market research department.
  • Meeting the curricular needs of CCE academic programs is a top strategic priority.  We respond to the identified priorities of each program as they are defined by program advisory committees and informed by continual market tracking from the college’s market research department. Outreach:  For our multidisciplinary or intercollege degree programs, we track gaps in online course availability for defined program subject areas and work to secure agreements with the external departments owning the subject space and designators. In-reach: Other academic units approach us with ideas for courses or credentials that serve a need for which they do not have capacity or mission to address.
  • We approach course design in two distinct ways.  In the first, the design and build processes are treated separately, with the instructional design phase ending in a fully documented hand-off or “blue print” from the ID to the course builder to kick-off the production phase. In this approach, an instructional designer is paired with the course author / instructor typically about 9 - 12 months before course launch. They work together to: •    Identify course goals and lesson objectives •    Suggest instructional and assessment strategies •    Insure adequate engagement: student to material / instructor  /student •    Evaluate and select appropriate media and cloud tools •    Collect, review, and organize content submissions from the instructor. •      About three months before launch the course blueprint is provided to the course developer to produce the course site. The second, design-build approach is being used with contract instructional designers, who produce the course site incrementally while working with the instructor.  In this scenario, the instructor is witness to and participates in the shaping of the final course site while content and learning activities are being designed.
  • CCE has used a full-service production model: CCE developers build the entire course site for instructors. Instructors are then provided hands-on training in the use of their own course site.   A New Media Group service unit within our college provides audio/video support, studio recording, and related services when needed   Enterprise-wide applications and structures are used to serve media to the course sites (Netfiles, Media Mill, Media Magnet)   Course developers build the Moodle site to specifications established in the design process: syllabus, lessons, activities, quizzes, assignments, grade book, flash presentations, etc.   Program-specific templates guide the organization of course elements within the site.   The department&apos;s materials coordinator guides the process of researching copyright issues and arranging fee payments when needed with assistance from the Copyright Permissions specialists from University Libraries. Additionally, the materials coordinator monitors textbook edition changes and provides notice in case course revisions need to be scheduled to accommodate a new text.
  • Each course is proofread and pilot-tested by departmental staff; program owners review the course before students are admitted. A debriefing session is held after the initial offering of each course to capture thoughts about ways to improve the course for the next offering; team includes program owner, course designer/developer and instructor
  • Delivering distance courses goes beyond launching course sites in the LMS.  A full support structure is in place to support learners, and to train and assist instructors.
  • Educause 2011 Bridging The Distance Across Time and Space

    1. 1. Engaging Learners Across Time and Space Models for Distance Learning Mary Davis, Director, Online & Distance Learning, College of Continuing Education Ron Fitch, eLearning Professional, UNITE Distributed Learning, College of Science & Engineering Jude Higdon, Ed.D., Director of Innovative Learning and Academic Technology
    2. 2. As you get seated... Point your mobile device or web browser to: http://z.umn.edu/educause2011 and answer our questions.  We'll push new questions out to you during our presentation. Follow the presentation online: http://z.umn.edu/educauseDL
    3. 3. Overview <ul><ul><li>If you’ve not already done so, please answer our ChimeIn questions at http://z.umn.edu/educause. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Opening and introduction of our framework. (Jude Higdon) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>College of Continuing Education Model. (Mary Davis) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>College of Pharmacy Model. (Jude Higdon) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>UNITE Model. (Ron Fitch) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Q&A (Everyone) </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Introduction Let's begin with a controversial statement:
    5. 5. Introduction Let's begin with a controversial statement: Learning in a digital space, either fully online or blended with face-to-face learning experiences, is not a fad.
    6. 6. Move to online is being driven by...
    7. 7. Introduction Let's make a less controversial statement:
    8. 8. Introduction Let's make a less controversial statement: Learning in a digital space, when structured thoughtfully and based on solid learning science, is as effective as (or more effective than) traditional forms of instruction.
    9. 9. Introduction <ul><li>Don't believe us? Let the science speak for itself... </li></ul><ul><ul><li>DOE meta-analysis of online learning practices (Means, et. al, 2009) http://z.umn.edu/dlreport </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Science article on TEL (Deslauriers, Schelew and Wieman, 2011) </li></ul></ul>Deslauriers, Louis, Ellen Schelew and Carl Wieman (2011). &quot;Improved Learning in a Large-Enrollment Physics Class&quot;. Science, 332 (6031). pp. 862-864. Means, Barbara, Yukie Toyama, Robert Murphy, Marianne Bakia, and Karla Jones (2009). &quot;Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practices in Online Learning: A  Meta-Analysis and Review of Online Learning Studies.” U.S. Department of Education Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development, Policy and Program Studies Service. 
    10. 10. Introduction Given these statements... ...the questions around online learning are transitioning from &quot;will we?&quot; to &quot;how will we?&quot;
    11. 11. Introduction of the Model <ul><li>What we'll discuss: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Programmatic model, rather than just an instructional design model. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focus on a few key principles, similarities and distinctions among our approaches to our DL program and design/production processes. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>We won't get to it all, but we're not hard to find if you want to follow up... </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Introduction of the Model <ul><li>Loosely based on an ADDIE model: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Analyze market, create mission/vision/goals, and define audience. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify courses for build or conversion. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Design courses. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Produce courses. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluate for quality. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deliver courses. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluate and iterate. </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Introduction of the Model
    14. 14. Introduction of the Model
    15. 15. Introduction of the Model
    16. 16. College of Continuing Education STEP 1: Market Analysis, Defining Audience and Mission and Vision   Mission: Provide high quality continuing education and lifelong learning opportunities for professional development, personal enrichment, career transitions, and academic growth. Audience: Adult learners, non-admitted students, admitted students seeking flexible options
    17. 17. College of Continuing Education
    18. 18. College of Continuing Education STEP 2: Identifying Courses for Build or Conversion   Academic program curricular prioritites  Program advisory committees Market research Partnership with other colleges and academic departments
    19. 19. College of Continuing Education <ul><li>STEP 3: Design </li></ul><ul><li>   </li></ul><ul><li>Design team: instructor + ID + program representative </li></ul><ul><li>Media production and graphic designers consulted as needed </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify significant learning and development objectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Devise instructional and assessment strategies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Emphasize active learning  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Balance </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
    20. 20. College of Continuing Education <ul><li>STEP 4: Production </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enterprise systems + locally licensed apps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>&quot;Full-service&quot; production </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Audio and video studio production </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Templates customized for academic program </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Copyright permissions management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Textbook edition monitoring </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. College of Continuing Education <ul><li>STEP 5: Quality Control </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Checklist-driven QC process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Second-party QC </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instructor review </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Program-owner review </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Initial launch debrief: program + instructor + designer/developer </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. College of Continuing Education <ul><li>STEP 6: Delivery </li></ul><ul><li>SUPPORT STRUCTURE: </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  Student: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Registration fulfillment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Communications (reminders,alerts) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>General troubleshooting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Off-campus exam proctoring </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Instructor: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Training + technical support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Policy support (academic misconduct, etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>     </li></ul><ul><li>     </li></ul><ul><li>     </li></ul><ul><li>     </li></ul><ul><li>    </li></ul><ul><li>     </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>                     </li></ul>
    23. 23. College of Continuing Education <ul><li>STEP 7: Evaluation and Iteration </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Post-initial launch review:  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>program + instructor + designer/developer </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Course evaluations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Revision schedule </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. College of Pharmacy STEP 1: Defining Mission and Vision and Identifying Audience and Potential Markets Vision and mission statements: &quot;We serve as the compass for leading pharmacy education worldwide by fostering transformative learning that challenges expectations, broadens horizons, and prepares learners for their lives as pharmacy leaders and engaged global citizens.  Our mission is to engage, to transform, and to improve lives through pharmacy education and our values include altruism, quality, innovation, leadership, and to be student-centered.&quot;
    25. 25. College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 1: Defining Mission and Vision and Identifying Audience and Potential Markets </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Intuition -- Where did we think our market was? Is online learning relevant to/necessary for pharmacy education? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Anecdotal evidence/relationships -- Talk to peers at other institutions. What needs do they have? What needs can we fill? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Large-scale market analysis -- Confirm your instincts and identify potential markets. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Results: The biggest potential market for our College lay in providing individual online courses to other Colleges of Pharmacy. </li></ul></ul>
    26. 26. College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 2: Identifying Courses for Build or Conversion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Individual faculty present ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Approaching interested faculty or faculty with interesting expertise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creating marketing &quot;buckshots&quot; of potential courses and approaching faculty </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Course readiness analysis </li></ul></ul>
    27. 27. College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 3: Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ID team exposes and agrees upon their design epistemologies/sensitivities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://z.umn.edu/educausesupplement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Overall design framework/sensitivities: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Focus on social presence theory (Biocca, Harms and Burgoon, 2003) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Integrate behaviorist learning principles and expertise theory (Ericcson, 1996) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Use social constructivist models for engagement (Tharp and Gallimore, 1998) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Design for motivational learning (Bandura, 1997; Clark and Estes, 2001; Vroom, 1964;) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    28. 28. College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 3: Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Map not only to learning goals, but also to accreditation standards and to OSCE/NAPLEX and others </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use templates for instructional assets as a starting point: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Moodle/LMS (basic student introductory materials, for example) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Syllabus (University policies) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Types of learning activities -- e.g.group work/social loafing </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop a learning asset management strategy -- LMS, LCMS, video management, cloud, other? </li></ul></ul>
    29. 29. College of Pharmacy STEP 4: Production
    30. 30. College of Pharmacy STEP 4: Production
    31. 31. College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 4.5: Marketing and Enrolling Students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Non-traditional students tax systems and structures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>No admissions process -- what pre-requisite knowledge do students need? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Marketing the &quot;real&quot; course </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What materials do non-traditional students have access to at your institution? </li></ul></ul></ul>
    32. 32. College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 5: Quality Control </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Guiding principle: cognitive load (van Merriënboer and Sweller, 2005) should be minimized </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Six week process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Based on the Quality Matters rubric </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Training/transitioning faculty to prepare for delivering (teaching) the course </li></ul></ul>
    33. 33. College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 6: Delivery model </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Faculty <--> course coordinator <--> students. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Weekly update, posted in a forum and sent by email </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reminders about upcoming assignments </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Changes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Planned outages </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Thank them for being part of the learning community </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Faculty: Show up and teach! Be active! Engage! </li></ul></ul>
    34. 34. College of Pharmacy <ul><li>STEP 7: Evaluation and Iteration </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ask faculty how it is going </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ask course coordinators how it is going </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ask students how it is going </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Middle of semester and end of course </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Those who enroll but drop early (&quot;soft&quot; drops) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Those who enroll but drop later (&quot;hard&quot; drops) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider version 2.0 of the course, with more advanced media and interactivity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>DO IT ALL AGAIN!!!!! </li></ul></ul>
    35. 35. UNITE STEP 1: Mission, Audience, History   “ UNITE Distributed Learning is dedicated to providing continuing educational opportunities for engineering and science professionals through distance education.”   UNITE is a self-supporting educational unit within the college, working in relationship with academic departments History of UNITE   Market - began with &quot;partner&quot; companies, now &quot;independent&quot; registrations account for more than 60 percent of enrollments    
    36. 36. UNITE STEP 2: Identifying Courses    Main focus is on graduate level courses for Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, Biomedical Engineering, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Targeted programs and colleges within College based on departmental interest   As requested by students enrolled or looking to enroll through UNITE (as part of degree through UNITE, to combine with F2F enrollment, graduate, undergraduate, audit, etc.)   Typically 50 - 60 courses each Fall and Spring   
    37. 37. UNITE STEP 3: Design   Past dictates practice   Goal is to accommodate faculty teaching styles     Building upon F2F sections of courses (“piggybacking”)   Class sessions are broadcasted and captured   Homework, exam and quiz oversight is handled by UNITE in collaboration with instructors and TAs   Student registration is handled by UNITE  Additional communication with students by UNITE  
    38. 38. UNITE STEPS 4-5-6: Production, Delivery & Quality Control   Eight Classrooms (smallest seats 40, largest seats 240):   • UNITE operator to run technical operations for faculty   Room cameras • Instructor mics (lapel and desk-based backup) • Overhead mics (for f2f students) • Overhead speakers • Computers with WACOM tablets (WACOM may be used with personal laptop) • High speed wired and wireless access • Plasma screens or video projection to display UNITE signal to f2f students • Toll-free phone (routed through operator)    
    39. 39. UNITE <ul><li>STEPS 4-5-6: Production, Delivery & Quality Control </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Class sessions are available to UNITE-enrolled students through: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>live streaming video </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>asynchronously as video streams, video and audio podcasts typically within an hour of end of class session </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple video versions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>single-pane, two-pane, widescreen H.264 QT  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>single-pane Flash versions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
    40. 40. UNITE  
    41. 41. UNITE STEPS 4-5-6: Production, Delivery & Quality Control   Archives available until end-of-semester    TAs and F2F students have access to streaming archives (F2F students on ten-day delay; delay lifted seven days prior to exams, three days prior to scheduled quizzes)   Online trouble reports are monitored by multiple staff members during live operations   Backup servers at separate campus 
    42. 42. UNITE  
    43. 43. UNITE STEP 7: Evaluation and Iteration   Tools added in collaboration with faculty needs and student requests   Technical enhancements and modifications as available   Our our tracking reports to see how students are accessing content   Student surveys every two years to learn how students use content, want to use it, trends and needs  
    44. 44. UNITE STEP 7: Evaluation and Iteration   “ The availability of delayed video-on-demand webcasts and/or downloadable podcasts … … make it possible for me to take a course that I otherwise    could not have taken.”            54% … make it substantially easier for me to take a course than it otherwise would have been.”  38% … make it somewhat easier for me to take a course than it otherwise would have been.”    2% … is irrelevant to my decisions about which courses to take.”                                         6%  
    45. 45. Comparison/Contrast Programs Audience and Mission Choose courses Design Production Quality Control Delivery Evaluation CCE Broad, University wide, adult learners, programs and individual courses Outreach and inreach, strategic support of CCE programs and University partnerships Classic instructional design process, standards-assisted Both handoff from design to production, and integrated design/build Based on QM Emphasis on student and instructor support Summative, team-based and course eval, issue logs CoP Relatively narrow, professional health care ed, individual courses Faculty driven, market driven (popular advanced elective topics) Classic instructional design, driven partially by audience expectations Integrated design and build process Based on QM and reducing cognitive load Emphasis on student and instructor support Formative and summative, team-based and student UNITE Graduate education, working professionals, programs and individual courses Departmentally driven and student requested Driven by historical precedent and faculty expectatoins Driven by historical precedent and student needs Focused on quality control in the process; ease of use for faculty and students Emphasis on student and instructor support Formative and summative, team-based and student
    46. 46. Key Conclusions and Takeaways <ul><ul><li>Overall: Form follows function </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>STEP 1: Mission, Vison, Learners, Audience and Market </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Be clear about who you're targeting, why, and what their expectations and learning needs are </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Being market-facing matters -- test your assumptions about your learners audience and align with real needs </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>STEP 2: Choosing Courses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Align choices strategically based on outcomes of step 1  </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Course and instructional readiness are important -- make sure the instructor knows what it will take and is ready </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>STEP 3: Design </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Have realistic, clear expectations about the time commitment required </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Make the process clear to faculty in advance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Use templates as a starting point whenever possible </li></ul></ul></ul>
    47. 47. Key Conclusions and Takeaways <ul><ul><li>STEP 3: Design (cont.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Emphasize three A's (activities, assignments and assessments) and iteratively map back to learning goals </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Have a clear, agreed upon set of instructional principles </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Make sure your courses are designed to integrate with your available production/delivery infrastructure </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>STEP 4: Production </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Emphasize quality instructional design over &quot;media WOW&quot; </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Use templates and standards when possible and appropriate </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Develop and implement a copyright, IP and ADA compliance strategy </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Consider end-users needs and your learners/audience expectations </li></ul></ul></ul>
    48. 48. Key Conclusions and Takeaways <ul><ul><li>STEP 5: Quality Control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Leave time to &quot;kick the tires&quot; and get feedback from people who did not design or produce the course </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Use this time to transition faculty from SME to teacher </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>STEP 6: Delivery </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Design and production should be complete before 1st day of classes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Support for faculty and students is key -- instructional, technical and administrative </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ongoing communication to keep learners engaged is critical </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>STEP 7: Evaluation and Iteration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Consider multiple sources of feedback: students, instructors, course support, etc. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Use the feedback to make the course better </li></ul></ul></ul>
    49. 49. Conclusions Takeaways <ul><ul><li>Be realistic about ability to build up capacity and new programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explore and balance the integration of enterprise (LMS), production (lecture recording) and cloud/app-based tools (annotating web sites) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Many (most?) institutions of higher learning are structured to support traditional students enrolled in degree-seeking academic programs -- be prepared to hit some roadblocks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Co-developing online projects and programs can be non-trivially complicated, even within a given institution </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop a learning asset management strategy early -- where will you house these materials? LMS, LCMS, video management, cloud, other? </li></ul></ul>
    50. 50. Contact us! <ul><li>We love talking about this stuff! Please feel free to get in touch. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mary Davis, davis777@umn.edu </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ron Fitch, ronfitch@umn.edu  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jude Higdon, Ed.D., jhigdon@umn.edu, @judalicious (Twitter) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Published presentation at: </li></ul><ul><li>http://z.umn.edu/educauseDL </li></ul>

    ×