Broadcast Bill
   In May 1997, the Broadcasting Bill was    introduced in parliament   The bill makes it mandatory for all channels    ...
   The bill bans cross-media ownership and    foreign ownership   No advertising agencies, religious bodies,    politica...
   In India,  Radio and Television broadcasting    have been a monopoly of the  Central    Government. The Indian Telegra...
   All this  suddenly changed with the advent of    the satellite TV in this part  of the world in    early 1990s. As dem...
   The telecommunication  revolution had     suddenly  arrived  on  the Indian horizon,     virtually bypassing  the gove...
   First, the  government reacted  by enacting     the Cable TV Network Act, 1994.  It sought     toregulate  the  thousa...
   In  the next  year the  Supreme Court  ruled    that "the broadcasting media  should be     under the control of the p...
   It has  taken the  government two  years  to     come  up  with  the Broadcast  Bill,   1997
 The Bill aims to provide  a  "level  playing   field  to  Indian entities"  and "facilitating private   broadcasting"   ...
   The Bill seeks to  set up  an "autonomous"    Broadcasting Authority of India    (BAI)  to   regulate  broadcasting   ...
   Bill will  become "catalyst  for social     change",  "promotion  of values of  Indian    culture"  by curbing  monopo...
   The new broadcast regulations of the    Ministry of Information and Broadcasting    (I&B) will not only cover televisi...
   Aims to provide strong centralized regulation    of cable and broadcasting   An aim to regulate certain aspects of   ...
   The draft bill proposes to set up an    independent Broadcasting Regulatory    Authority of India (BRAI) and one its m...
   The issue came into sharp focus after the    26/11 Mumbai attacks when the government    felt that the 24/7 competitiv...
   Information and Broadcasting Minister    Ambika Soni has stressed on debate among    stakeholders to evolve a consensu...
   Every service provider to register his TV or    Radio channel with the Broadcasting    Regulatory authority of India ...
   Content that is obscene or vulgar   Of a terrorist organisation   Copyright protected   Of a Foreign channel
   In the event of a war or a natural calamity of    a national magnitude   Power of the central govt to take over the  ...
   Restrictions imposed on accumulation of    interest   An attempt to prevent media consolidation   To prevent monopol...
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Broadcast Bill

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Broadcast Bill

Rohitha Sankar
BA Journalism

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Broadcast Bill

  1. 1. Broadcast Bill
  2. 2.  In May 1997, the Broadcasting Bill was introduced in parliament The bill makes it mandatory for all channels whether Indian or foreign to transmit their programs from Indian territory Licenses for satellite channels will be granted only to Indian companies and they would be allowed up to 49% foreign equity No foreign equity for terrestrial channels would be allowed
  3. 3.  The bill bans cross-media ownership and foreign ownership No advertising agencies, religious bodies, political parties or publicly funded bodies will be granted a license to own a Television company
  4. 4.  In India,  Radio and Television broadcasting have been a monopoly of the  Central Government. The Indian Telegraph Act, 1885, a law enacted  by   the  British,   has  been   used  to   bar  private entrepreneurs from  entering  the  broadcasting  arena.
  5. 5.  All this  suddenly changed with the advent of the satellite TV in this part  of the world in early 1990s. As demand for information and entertainment  grew, entrepreneurs,  mostly in  the  informal sector, started setting up small cable TV operations all over the country.
  6. 6.  The telecommunication  revolution had  suddenly  arrived  on  the Indian horizon,  virtually bypassing  the government.  Inevitably this gave  rise to a lot of discussion in the media and elsewhere about   "cultural    invasion",   "promotion   of   consumerism", "possibility of  propaganda  and  misinformation  campaigns  from abroad", etc.  There was  even some talk about the feasibility of banning satellite dish antennas.
  7. 7.  First, the  government reacted  by enacting  the Cable TV Network Act, 1994.  It sought  toregulate  the  thousands  of  cable  TV operators.
  8. 8.  In  the next  year the  Supreme Court  ruled that "the broadcasting media  should be  under the control of the public as distinct  from   the government."   It  also   held   that   the electromagnetic spectrum  was a  public property  and not a state monopoly. The  Court directed  the Central  Government  to  "take immediate steps  to establish  an independent    public authority representing all sections and interests in the society to control and regulate the use of the Airwaves."
  9. 9.  It has  taken the  government two  years  to  come  up  with  the Broadcast  Bill,   1997
  10. 10.  The Bill aims to provide  a  "level  playing  field  to  Indian entities"  and "facilitating private  broadcasting"    to  ensure  "variety  and plurality  of   programmes  required  in  different  regions  and different sections  of society  in our  vast country."  
  11. 11.  The Bill seeks to  set up  an "autonomous" Broadcasting Authority of India (BAI)  to   regulate  broadcasting   by  licensing  broadcasters, allocating frequencies  on the  electromagnetic spectrum, monitor quality, cost and content of service.
  12. 12.  Bill will  become "catalyst  for social  change",  "promotion  of values of  Indian culture"  by curbing  monopolistic  trends  and ensuring competition.
  13. 13.  The new broadcast regulations of the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting (I&B) will not only cover television content but also films. With the new guidelines, the ministry plans to regulate depictions of terrorism, violence, armed forces, religion, communal issues and obscenity in the movies.
  14. 14.  Aims to provide strong centralized regulation of cable and broadcasting An aim to regulate certain aspects of carriage and content of broadcasting No broadcasting service would be possible without obtaining a license in this regard License to be obtained from a statutory body
  15. 15.  The draft bill proposes to set up an independent Broadcasting Regulatory Authority of India (BRAI) and one its major functions would be monitoring and regulation of content The broadcast bill has been embroiled in controversy as many fear that the statute and the proposed content code may be used by the government to control and muzzle the electronic media.
  16. 16.  The issue came into sharp focus after the 26/11 Mumbai attacks when the government felt that the 24/7 competitive coverage of the carnage by TV channels had compromised national security by giving away to the attackers details of the movement of the security forces and of the civilians trapped in Mumbai’s Taj Hotel
  17. 17.  Information and Broadcasting Minister Ambika Soni has stressed on debate among stakeholders to evolve a consensus on the contentious issue
  18. 18.  Every service provider to register his TV or Radio channel with the Broadcasting Regulatory authority of India BRAI – Proposed independent regulator for the broadcasting sector
  19. 19.  Content that is obscene or vulgar Of a terrorist organisation Copyright protected Of a Foreign channel
  20. 20.  In the event of a war or a natural calamity of a national magnitude Power of the central govt to take over the management and control of any broadcasting service or any facility connected with it
  21. 21.  Restrictions imposed on accumulation of interest An attempt to prevent media consolidation To prevent monopoly across different segments of the media Broadcast bill to cover the content of advertisements

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