New Teacher/Faculty Induction      Program Models
New Teacher Induction Program              ModelsThe three characteristics of an effective teacher are:1. has good classro...
Program ROHIT SHARMA      Mr. Presenters    Lecturer @ JUIT SOLAN
Student Teacher/New Teacher Professional             Development Program• Rohit sharma – Program Coordinator• Aim• Call (o...
Professional Development ProgramThe professional development coordinator willwork with student teachers and new teachers t...
Prerequisites of           Effective Teaching• Work to develop the relationship between  teacher preparation and effective...
The Teacher as a Person• Use numerous examples that link  personality traits and effective teachers• Demonstrate how effec...
Classroom Management and                  Organization•Illustrate the key classroom management skillsof effective teachers...
PlanningYour long-term planning should include:• the objectives and learning outcomes for the course• the strategies you w...
• • assessment and evaluation strategies to  evaluate student progress• • what resources you will need• Short-Term Plannin...
• Organize and carefully prepare daily lesson  plans. They should include the• following: Daily Planning• • student learni...
Organizing and Orienting for                 Instruction• Demonstrate how to utilize instructional time  effectively• Demo...
Implementing Instruction• Provide guidelines for enhancing instruction• Demonstrate how to communicate content  and expect...
Monitoring Student Progress and           Potential• Illustrate how to monitor student learning• Utilize the findings to f...
Organizing and Orienting for             Instruction• Utilize instructional time effectively• Plan effectively for instruc...
Personal Background and Experience
Teacher EducationTeacher Preparation  Preservice  Staff Development    Agricultural Education       Secondary       ...
Current Staff Development EffortsDirector of Minnesota Agricultural Education Teacher Induction Program (TIP)Director of...
Rationale for InformationConcerning Teacher Induction
The Challenge: Shortages or   Distribution Problems of TeachersSources of a Cadre of Quality Teachers  New graduates fro...
The Challenge: High Turnover Rates of            Novice TeachersOpinions and research suggest 35-50 percent of new teache...
Teacher Preparation: Processes and             Forces
Typical state system of teacher development,                      assessment, and certification.   PRESERVICE             ...
Influences on Teacher Development                          Preconceptions     Professional     Development     Experiences...
Stages of Development of Novice            Teacher
Major Stages of DevelopmentSurvivalTaskImpact
Phases of First Year Teachers’ Attitude          Towards Teaching (Moir, 1992)        Anticipation                        ...
Personal Background and Experience
Teacher EducationTeacher Preparation  Preservice  Staff Development    Agricultural Education       Secondary       ...
Current Staff Development EffortsDirector of Minnesota Agricultural Education Teacher Induction Program (TIP)Director of...
Rationale for InformationConcerning Teacher Induction
The Challenge: Shortages or Distribution Problems of TeachersSources of a Cadre of Quality Teachers  New graduates from ...
The Challenge: High Turnover Rates of            Novice TeachersOpinions and research suggest 35-50 percent of new teache...
Program                       Purpose &                       RationaleSchool District &                        Mentor Tea...
CIRCLE OF QUALITY MENTORING PROGRAMS AND PRACTICES       © 2011, Amelia M. Hicks,                 Ed.D.
Mentoring and LearningBackground Research• No criteria for a quality program• Difficult to determine successful induction
Mentoring and Learning• Validation Study• Survey of indicators of quality
Mentoring and LearningQuality Mentoring Programs• Content of mentoring program• Teacher retention• New teacher needs
Program Purpose                      Dimension 1• Professional practice aligned with standards  for teaching• Professional...
Program Purpose – Dimension I• Manage the day-to-day challenges of  teaching.• Prepare, select, and retain quality teacher...
Roles/Cultures                       Dimension IISchool, District, and University Cultures and    ResponsibilitiesDevelopi...
Roles/Cultures/Partnerships                    Dimension IIUniversity engagement• Pre-service programs  – On-going profess...
Roles/Cultures                Dimension IIMentor role• Learning to teach: a career-long process• Teaching diverse learners...
Mentor Selection/Matching                   Dimension IIIMentor Selection• Committed to developing own practice• Knowledge...
Mentor Selection                        Dimension III•   Commitment to mentor responsibilities•   Dedication to ethical pr...
Mentor Preparation                      Dimension IV• Analyze and reflect on classroom teaching and  mentor/novice interac...
Mentor Preparation                        Dimension IV•   Analyze the learning of diverse students•   Work with novices as...
Mentor Preparation                         Dimension IV• Share mentoring practices with other mentors• Explore strategies ...
Mentor Roles                  Dimension V• Support and facilitate standards-based  practice• Facilitate and model self-ref...
Mentor Roles                 Dimension V• Build a professional relationship with  the novice• Support the novice before an...
Mentor Roles                   Dimension V• Support and challenge the novice on his or her  teaching practices• Interact b...
Coordinator                    Dimension VIProgram Coordination, Implementation and   Evaluation•   Committed to program p...
The Mentoring Framework• Six dimensions represent the ideal structures  and practices promoting quality mentoring  – Assis...
Program                       Purpose &                       RationaleSchool District &                        Mentor Tea...
The Mentoring Framework• Represents a standards-based approach to  Mentoring• Improves teacher quality to enhance student ...
Benefits of Enrollment in Teacher         Induction ProgramsMore positive attitudes toward teaching; and plan to continue...
Challenges and Difficulties of Novice                  TeachersStudent managementStudent motivationLocating teaching ma...
Challenges and Difficulties of Novice             Teachers (cont’d)Insufficient time for preparationRelationships with p...
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Induction

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  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D. This led me to continue my research at the doctoral level – The questions were how do we know that we have quality programs?
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D. Content is learned in college but not necessarily methods of instructional delivery and classroom management. Employers did not help much either.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D. Of the five indicators, the program purposes were identified and linked to perception of quality, there is no evidence that program purpose was being communicated to stakeholders. Criteria were mainly support focused.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D. There are a total of 11 quality indicators selected from 20 in Dimension II.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D. There are 8 standards in this Dimension from a potential of 17. The focus was on devloping criteria as opposed to a process for implementation.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D. This dimension focuses on the professional development of the mentor. 12 criteria were selected from the 23 potential indicators. These standards selected identify criteria for preparation but no current practices included intensive and ongoing professional development.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D. The criteria selected focused on school and district cultures but not on university roles
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D. Eight quality indicators met the benchmark from a potential of 15 quality indicators.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D. The quality criteria that met the benchmark of quality and current practices again identified criteria but not the process and no standards for ongoing training.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D. Of the potential 15 quality indicators only four were selected. There is no mention of evaluation of program to be linked to program purpose.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • © 2006, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
  • Induction

    1. 1. New Teacher/Faculty Induction Program Models
    2. 2. New Teacher Induction Program ModelsThe three characteristics of an effective teacher are:1. has good classroom management skills 2.teaches for mastery3. has positive expectations for student success
    3. 3. Program ROHIT SHARMA Mr. Presenters Lecturer @ JUIT SOLAN
    4. 4. Student Teacher/New Teacher Professional Development Program• Rohit sharma – Program Coordinator• Aim• Call (or write) each home before school begins and again within two weeks.• Teachers + Parents = Good Students
    5. 5. Professional Development ProgramThe professional development coordinator willwork with student teachers and new teachers todevelop their teaching capacity andcollaborative ability.Treat students as though they already are whatthey can be, and you helpthem to be capable of becoming what they willbe
    6. 6. Prerequisites of Effective Teaching• Work to develop the relationship between teacher preparation and effective teaching• Dress in a professional manner to model success and expect achievement• Demonstrate the benefits of reflecting upon experiences
    7. 7. The Teacher as a Person• Use numerous examples that link personality traits and effective teachers• Demonstrate how effective teachers interact with their students
    8. 8. Classroom Management and Organization•Illustrate the key classroom management skillsof effective teachers•Provide effective classroom organizationalguidelines
    9. 9. PlanningYour long-term planning should include:• the objectives and learning outcomes for the course• the strategies you will use to reach those objectives• the overall strategies for including learning outcomes• the time to be allocated
    10. 10. • • assessment and evaluation strategies to evaluate student progress• • what resources you will need• Short-Term Planning• Initially, your planning will be very detailed. Design individual lessons as part of• the whole unit to increase knowledge, abilities, and skills based on previously• learned concepts. This way, you will give your students the learning opportunities• they need and avoid gaps and needless repetition.
    11. 11. • Organize and carefully prepare daily lesson plans. They should include the• following: Daily Planning• • student learning outcomes• • subject matter• • learning strategies• • assessment and evaluation processes• • materials needed
    12. 12. Organizing and Orienting for Instruction• Demonstrate how to utilize instructional time effectively• Demonstrate how to plan effectively for instruction
    13. 13. Implementing Instruction• Provide guidelines for enhancing instruction• Demonstrate how to communicate content and expectations to students
    14. 14. Monitoring Student Progress and Potential• Illustrate how to monitor student learning• Utilize the findings to foster progress
    15. 15. Organizing and Orienting for Instruction• Utilize instructional time effectively• Plan effectively for instruction
    16. 16. Personal Background and Experience
    17. 17. Teacher EducationTeacher Preparation Preservice Staff Development Agricultural Education Secondary Middle School Adult Career and Technical EducationResearch Induction - Forms of Assistance; Models
    18. 18. Current Staff Development EffortsDirector of Minnesota Agricultural Education Teacher Induction Program (TIP)Director of Minnesota Farm Business Management Education Professional Excellence Program (PEP)Courses & Workshops: Secondary & Adult
    19. 19. Rationale for InformationConcerning Teacher Induction
    20. 20. The Challenge: Shortages or Distribution Problems of TeachersSources of a Cadre of Quality Teachers New graduates from colleges of education Graduates of alternative licensure programs Career teachers Re-entry teachers Emergency or provisionally licensed Other:________
    21. 21. The Challenge: High Turnover Rates of Novice TeachersOpinions and research suggest 35-50 percent of new teachers leave in the first five years in the profession
    22. 22. Teacher Preparation: Processes and Forces
    23. 23. Typical state system of teacher development, assessment, and certification. PRESERVICE INDUCTION CONTINUOUS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT University Teacher Initial Teaching Certificate Master Teaching Standard Teaching Certificate Education Program Often about a 4-year limit Certificate No limit. Renewable, often No limit. Renewable. every five years on evidence of professional development Formative performance assessment to support beginning teacher growth standards Summative assessment points that are related to the Professional Teaching Standards NCATE INTASC NBPTS National Council for Interstate New Teacher National Board ofAccreditation of Teacher Assessment & Support Professional Teaching Education Standards Consortium model Standards certification standards for beginning teachers Connections to National Teaching Standards Rohit sharma
    24. 24. Influences on Teacher Development Preconceptions Professional Development Experiences Testing Teaching Experience Mentoring Performance Teaching Appraisals Standards Formal Pre- & Continued Professional Development Source: State & Professional Quality Local Mentoring for Growth Plan Contexts Novice Teachers Eds. Sandra J. Odell and Leslie
    25. 25. Stages of Development of Novice Teacher
    26. 26. Major Stages of DevelopmentSurvivalTaskImpact
    27. 27. Phases of First Year Teachers’ Attitude Towards Teaching (Moir, 1992) Anticipation Anticipation Survival Reflection Rejuvenation DisillusionmentAug Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr MayJune July
    28. 28. Personal Background and Experience
    29. 29. Teacher EducationTeacher Preparation Preservice Staff Development Agricultural Education Secondary Middle School Adult Career and Technical EducationResearch Induction - Forms of Assistance; Models
    30. 30. Current Staff Development EffortsDirector of Minnesota Agricultural Education Teacher Induction Program (TIP)Director of Minnesota Farm Business Management Education Professional Excellence Program (PEP)Courses & Workshops: Secondary & Adult
    31. 31. Rationale for InformationConcerning Teacher Induction
    32. 32. The Challenge: Shortages or Distribution Problems of TeachersSources of a Cadre of Quality Teachers New graduates from colleges of education Graduates of alternative licensure programs Career teachers Re-entry teachers Emergency or provisionally licensed Other:______________________________
    33. 33. The Challenge: High Turnover Rates of Novice TeachersOpinions and research suggest 35-50 percent of new teachers leave in the first five years in the profession
    34. 34. Program Purpose & RationaleSchool District & Mentor Teacher University Preparation & Cultures Development Circle of Quality Mentoring Implement Mentor Selection & & Mentor/ Evaluate Protégé Matching Program Roles Mentor & Practices
    35. 35. CIRCLE OF QUALITY MENTORING PROGRAMS AND PRACTICES © 2011, Amelia M. Hicks, Ed.D.
    36. 36. Mentoring and LearningBackground Research• No criteria for a quality program• Difficult to determine successful induction
    37. 37. Mentoring and Learning• Validation Study• Survey of indicators of quality
    38. 38. Mentoring and LearningQuality Mentoring Programs• Content of mentoring program• Teacher retention• New teacher needs
    39. 39. Program Purpose Dimension 1• Professional practice aligned with standards for teaching• Professional identity through reflection and inquiry
    40. 40. Program Purpose – Dimension I• Manage the day-to-day challenges of teaching.• Prepare, select, and retain quality teachers.• Provide personal and professional support.
    41. 41. Roles/Cultures Dimension IISchool, District, and University Cultures and ResponsibilitiesDeveloping a school community of support• School and community context• Time for teacher development• Opportunities to work with other educators• Administrator support
    42. 42. Roles/Cultures/Partnerships Dimension IIUniversity engagement• Pre-service programs – On-going professional development – Research-based knowledge related to quality teaching
    43. 43. Roles/Cultures Dimension IIMentor role• Learning to teach: a career-long process• Teaching diverse learners• Reflecting with novices• Receiving recognition and compensation
    44. 44. Mentor Selection/Matching Dimension IIIMentor Selection• Committed to developing own practice• Knowledgeable about standards-based teaching• Competent in working with adults from diverse backgrounds• Sensitive to the viewpoints of others
    45. 45. Mentor Selection Dimension III• Commitment to mentor responsibilities• Dedication to ethical practices• Professional and emotional support• Similar teaching assignments
    46. 46. Mentor Preparation Dimension IV• Analyze and reflect on classroom teaching and mentor/novice interactions• Understand needs/concerns of novices• Foster productive conversations
    47. 47. Mentor Preparation Dimension IV• Analyze the learning of diverse students• Work with novices as adult learners• Coach and provide feedback on mentoring practices and problem solving
    48. 48. Mentor Preparation Dimension IV• Share mentoring practices with other mentors• Explore strategies to build and strengthen the mentor/novice relationship• Receive monetary or other compensation
    49. 49. Mentor Roles Dimension V• Support and facilitate standards-based practice• Facilitate and model self-reflection, problem-solving, and instructional improvement
    50. 50. Mentor Roles Dimension V• Build a professional relationship with the novice• Support the novice before and during the school year
    51. 51. Mentor Roles Dimension V• Support and challenge the novice on his or her teaching practices• Interact both formally and informally• Offer empathy and assistance to novices coping with the stresses of teaching
    52. 52. Coordinator Dimension VIProgram Coordination, Implementation and Evaluation• Committed to program purposes• Knowledgeable and experienced in mentoring initiatives• Effective in working with people of diverse backgrounds• Adept in coordinating professional development for mentors and novices
    53. 53. The Mentoring Framework• Six dimensions represent the ideal structures and practices promoting quality mentoring – Assistance – Assessment
    54. 54. Program Purpose & RationaleSchool District & Mentor Teacher University Preparation & Cultures Development Circle of Quality Mentoring Implement Mentor Selection & & Mentor/ Evaluate Protégé Matching Program Roles Mentor & Practices
    55. 55. The Mentoring Framework• Represents a standards-based approach to Mentoring• Improves teacher quality to enhance student learning
    56. 56. Benefits of Enrollment in Teacher Induction ProgramsMore positive attitudes toward teaching; and plan to continue in profession longerAchievement scores of students of highly skilled and satisfied teachers are higher
    57. 57. Challenges and Difficulties of Novice TeachersStudent managementStudent motivationLocating teaching materialsRoom and lesson organizationUnderstanding complex school systemsMeeting needs of individual students (Griffen, 1985; Odell, 1986; Veenman, 1984)
    58. 58. Challenges and Difficulties of Novice Teachers (cont’d)Insufficient time for preparationRelationships with parentsSelecting and using alternative teaching strategies (Veenman, 1984)
    59. 59. Thanking You

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