Beyond a Trend: How Scientists Use Social Media
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Beyond a Trend: How Scientists Use Social Media

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Slides from my presentation at the Restoration 2012 Conference in Victoria, BC

Slides from my presentation at the Restoration 2012 Conference in Victoria, BC

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  • Before we get started I want to let you all know about the format of this session\n we will have 3 talks to start out with\n mine is on how scientists use social media and is about 30 minutes\n Iris Kemp is next with how you can share your research by blogging\n her talk is about 20 minutes\n and Jessie Hale will go into more of the nitty gritty of twitter and how you live-tweet a conference or a talk\n her talk is about 10 minutes long\n we’ll take just a few questions after each of our talks,\n we’ll have an extended question and answer session after the three talks where we can really get into any details you want to know about\n\n\n the last part of the session will be an interactive workshop to help you get started on twitter\n and we’ll be available to sit down with you and show you what is going on\n depending on who is still around for this part, we can also talk about some other social media networks\n finally, I want to let you all know that for all of these talks, we are putting the resources and links we mention on our wiki\n a wiki is a website where users can add or modify content \ni will have the link to the wiki at the end of the presentation, so don’t worry about writing everything down\n\n\n I manage the social media accounts for AFSUW and WABC AFS, and I also managed them for the 2011 annual AFS meeting\n As someone from the “social media generation”, I sort of fell into these positions because I knew how to use social media\n I began college in 2004, which was the year facebook became available at most colleges \n And I was quick to adopt the network and became fluent in likes, comments, pages and events\n
  • \n
  • Throughout college I loved field research and traveling\n And I used facebook mostly to share travel photos and keep up with friends\n for example, this is a photo a colleague of mine took during our field work in the Turks & Caicos Islands - \n a juvenile lemon shark in a mangrove forest\n perfect facebook material\n\n after I graduated I quickly grew tired of social media, \n I felt that it was mostly about trivial conversations and catching up with long lost friends\n which is great, but\n I was preparing for graduate school, \n and I decided that it was time for me to become more professional\n
  • Also during that time, many new different kinds of social networks were beginning to become popular, \n they all have a different purpose, and as a result, \n they all have a different culture and demographic of users\n but I still thought most of them were just so you could tell people about trivial things in your life, \n for example, the donut you were eating for breakfast\n so here i’m going to tell you the gist of what some of the popular social networks are for \n using the example of sharing about your donut experience\n\n click 1\n twitter is a service for posting short messages, often about news or things going on around you\n so on twitter you might say “I am eating a donut”\n\n click 2 \n facebook is a traditional social network that connects you to people you know\n it has a function called the “like” button, \n which is sort of an empty internet scoring system\n so on facebook, you would “like” a donut\n\n click 3\n foursquare is a social network that allows you to tell your friends where you go and hang out\n so on foursquare you would say “this is where I eat donuts”\n\n click 4\n instagram is a photo sharing network that has a feature that lets you make your photos look vintage\n so on instagram you would say “here’s a vintage photo of my donut”\n\n click 5\n youtube is a video sharing netowork\n so on youtube you would say “here is a video of me eating a donut”\n\n click 6 \n finally, linked in is a professional networking site where you share your resume and can looks for jobs\n so on linked in you might say “my skills include donut eating”\n\n\n there are lots of other social media networks\n and in fact, social media just means any internet application where the user generates the content\n so things like blogs are in a way a kind of social media\n\n
  • Also during that time, many new different kinds of social networks were beginning to become popular, \n they all have a different purpose, and as a result, \n they all have a different culture and demographic of users\n but I still thought most of them were just so you could tell people about trivial things in your life, \n for example, the donut you were eating for breakfast\n so here i’m going to tell you the gist of what some of the popular social networks are for \n using the example of sharing about your donut experience\n\n click 1\n twitter is a service for posting short messages, often about news or things going on around you\n so on twitter you might say “I am eating a donut”\n\n click 2 \n facebook is a traditional social network that connects you to people you know\n it has a function called the “like” button, \n which is sort of an empty internet scoring system\n so on facebook, you would “like” a donut\n\n click 3\n foursquare is a social network that allows you to tell your friends where you go and hang out\n so on foursquare you would say “this is where I eat donuts”\n\n click 4\n instagram is a photo sharing network that has a feature that lets you make your photos look vintage\n so on instagram you would say “here’s a vintage photo of my donut”\n\n click 5\n youtube is a video sharing netowork\n so on youtube you would say “here is a video of me eating a donut”\n\n click 6 \n finally, linked in is a professional networking site where you share your resume and can looks for jobs\n so on linked in you might say “my skills include donut eating”\n\n\n there are lots of other social media networks\n and in fact, social media just means any internet application where the user generates the content\n so things like blogs are in a way a kind of social media\n\n
  • Also during that time, many new different kinds of social networks were beginning to become popular, \n they all have a different purpose, and as a result, \n they all have a different culture and demographic of users\n but I still thought most of them were just so you could tell people about trivial things in your life, \n for example, the donut you were eating for breakfast\n so here i’m going to tell you the gist of what some of the popular social networks are for \n using the example of sharing about your donut experience\n\n click 1\n twitter is a service for posting short messages, often about news or things going on around you\n so on twitter you might say “I am eating a donut”\n\n click 2 \n facebook is a traditional social network that connects you to people you know\n it has a function called the “like” button, \n which is sort of an empty internet scoring system\n so on facebook, you would “like” a donut\n\n click 3\n foursquare is a social network that allows you to tell your friends where you go and hang out\n so on foursquare you would say “this is where I eat donuts”\n\n click 4\n instagram is a photo sharing network that has a feature that lets you make your photos look vintage\n so on instagram you would say “here’s a vintage photo of my donut”\n\n click 5\n youtube is a video sharing netowork\n so on youtube you would say “here is a video of me eating a donut”\n\n click 6 \n finally, linked in is a professional networking site where you share your resume and can looks for jobs\n so on linked in you might say “my skills include donut eating”\n\n\n there are lots of other social media networks\n and in fact, social media just means any internet application where the user generates the content\n so things like blogs are in a way a kind of social media\n\n
  • Also during that time, many new different kinds of social networks were beginning to become popular, \n they all have a different purpose, and as a result, \n they all have a different culture and demographic of users\n but I still thought most of them were just so you could tell people about trivial things in your life, \n for example, the donut you were eating for breakfast\n so here i’m going to tell you the gist of what some of the popular social networks are for \n using the example of sharing about your donut experience\n\n click 1\n twitter is a service for posting short messages, often about news or things going on around you\n so on twitter you might say “I am eating a donut”\n\n click 2 \n facebook is a traditional social network that connects you to people you know\n it has a function called the “like” button, \n which is sort of an empty internet scoring system\n so on facebook, you would “like” a donut\n\n click 3\n foursquare is a social network that allows you to tell your friends where you go and hang out\n so on foursquare you would say “this is where I eat donuts”\n\n click 4\n instagram is a photo sharing network that has a feature that lets you make your photos look vintage\n so on instagram you would say “here’s a vintage photo of my donut”\n\n click 5\n youtube is a video sharing netowork\n so on youtube you would say “here is a video of me eating a donut”\n\n click 6 \n finally, linked in is a professional networking site where you share your resume and can looks for jobs\n so on linked in you might say “my skills include donut eating”\n\n\n there are lots of other social media networks\n and in fact, social media just means any internet application where the user generates the content\n so things like blogs are in a way a kind of social media\n\n
  • Also during that time, many new different kinds of social networks were beginning to become popular, \n they all have a different purpose, and as a result, \n they all have a different culture and demographic of users\n but I still thought most of them were just so you could tell people about trivial things in your life, \n for example, the donut you were eating for breakfast\n so here i’m going to tell you the gist of what some of the popular social networks are for \n using the example of sharing about your donut experience\n\n click 1\n twitter is a service for posting short messages, often about news or things going on around you\n so on twitter you might say “I am eating a donut”\n\n click 2 \n facebook is a traditional social network that connects you to people you know\n it has a function called the “like” button, \n which is sort of an empty internet scoring system\n so on facebook, you would “like” a donut\n\n click 3\n foursquare is a social network that allows you to tell your friends where you go and hang out\n so on foursquare you would say “this is where I eat donuts”\n\n click 4\n instagram is a photo sharing network that has a feature that lets you make your photos look vintage\n so on instagram you would say “here’s a vintage photo of my donut”\n\n click 5\n youtube is a video sharing netowork\n so on youtube you would say “here is a video of me eating a donut”\n\n click 6 \n finally, linked in is a professional networking site where you share your resume and can looks for jobs\n so on linked in you might say “my skills include donut eating”\n\n\n there are lots of other social media networks\n and in fact, social media just means any internet application where the user generates the content\n so things like blogs are in a way a kind of social media\n\n
  • Also during that time, many new different kinds of social networks were beginning to become popular, \n they all have a different purpose, and as a result, \n they all have a different culture and demographic of users\n but I still thought most of them were just so you could tell people about trivial things in your life, \n for example, the donut you were eating for breakfast\n so here i’m going to tell you the gist of what some of the popular social networks are for \n using the example of sharing about your donut experience\n\n click 1\n twitter is a service for posting short messages, often about news or things going on around you\n so on twitter you might say “I am eating a donut”\n\n click 2 \n facebook is a traditional social network that connects you to people you know\n it has a function called the “like” button, \n which is sort of an empty internet scoring system\n so on facebook, you would “like” a donut\n\n click 3\n foursquare is a social network that allows you to tell your friends where you go and hang out\n so on foursquare you would say “this is where I eat donuts”\n\n click 4\n instagram is a photo sharing network that has a feature that lets you make your photos look vintage\n so on instagram you would say “here’s a vintage photo of my donut”\n\n click 5\n youtube is a video sharing netowork\n so on youtube you would say “here is a video of me eating a donut”\n\n click 6 \n finally, linked in is a professional networking site where you share your resume and can looks for jobs\n so on linked in you might say “my skills include donut eating”\n\n\n there are lots of other social media networks\n and in fact, social media just means any internet application where the user generates the content\n so things like blogs are in a way a kind of social media\n\n
  • Also during that time, many new different kinds of social networks were beginning to become popular, \n they all have a different purpose, and as a result, \n they all have a different culture and demographic of users\n but I still thought most of them were just so you could tell people about trivial things in your life, \n for example, the donut you were eating for breakfast\n so here i’m going to tell you the gist of what some of the popular social networks are for \n using the example of sharing about your donut experience\n\n click 1\n twitter is a service for posting short messages, often about news or things going on around you\n so on twitter you might say “I am eating a donut”\n\n click 2 \n facebook is a traditional social network that connects you to people you know\n it has a function called the “like” button, \n which is sort of an empty internet scoring system\n so on facebook, you would “like” a donut\n\n click 3\n foursquare is a social network that allows you to tell your friends where you go and hang out\n so on foursquare you would say “this is where I eat donuts”\n\n click 4\n instagram is a photo sharing network that has a feature that lets you make your photos look vintage\n so on instagram you would say “here’s a vintage photo of my donut”\n\n click 5\n youtube is a video sharing netowork\n so on youtube you would say “here is a video of me eating a donut”\n\n click 6 \n finally, linked in is a professional networking site where you share your resume and can looks for jobs\n so on linked in you might say “my skills include donut eating”\n\n\n there are lots of other social media networks\n and in fact, social media just means any internet application where the user generates the content\n so things like blogs are in a way a kind of social media\n\n
  • Also during that time, many new different kinds of social networks were beginning to become popular, \n they all have a different purpose, and as a result, \n they all have a different culture and demographic of users\n but I still thought most of them were just so you could tell people about trivial things in your life, \n for example, the donut you were eating for breakfast\n so here i’m going to tell you the gist of what some of the popular social networks are for \n using the example of sharing about your donut experience\n\n click 1\n twitter is a service for posting short messages, often about news or things going on around you\n so on twitter you might say “I am eating a donut”\n\n click 2 \n facebook is a traditional social network that connects you to people you know\n it has a function called the “like” button, \n which is sort of an empty internet scoring system\n so on facebook, you would “like” a donut\n\n click 3\n foursquare is a social network that allows you to tell your friends where you go and hang out\n so on foursquare you would say “this is where I eat donuts”\n\n click 4\n instagram is a photo sharing network that has a feature that lets you make your photos look vintage\n so on instagram you would say “here’s a vintage photo of my donut”\n\n click 5\n youtube is a video sharing netowork\n so on youtube you would say “here is a video of me eating a donut”\n\n click 6 \n finally, linked in is a professional networking site where you share your resume and can looks for jobs\n so on linked in you might say “my skills include donut eating”\n\n\n there are lots of other social media networks\n and in fact, social media just means any internet application where the user generates the content\n so things like blogs are in a way a kind of social media\n\n
  • Also during that time, many new different kinds of social networks were beginning to become popular, \n they all have a different purpose, and as a result, \n they all have a different culture and demographic of users\n but I still thought most of them were just so you could tell people about trivial things in your life, \n for example, the donut you were eating for breakfast\n so here i’m going to tell you the gist of what some of the popular social networks are for \n using the example of sharing about your donut experience\n\n click 1\n twitter is a service for posting short messages, often about news or things going on around you\n so on twitter you might say “I am eating a donut”\n\n click 2 \n facebook is a traditional social network that connects you to people you know\n it has a function called the “like” button, \n which is sort of an empty internet scoring system\n so on facebook, you would “like” a donut\n\n click 3\n foursquare is a social network that allows you to tell your friends where you go and hang out\n so on foursquare you would say “this is where I eat donuts”\n\n click 4\n instagram is a photo sharing network that has a feature that lets you make your photos look vintage\n so on instagram you would say “here’s a vintage photo of my donut”\n\n click 5\n youtube is a video sharing netowork\n so on youtube you would say “here is a video of me eating a donut”\n\n click 6 \n finally, linked in is a professional networking site where you share your resume and can looks for jobs\n so on linked in you might say “my skills include donut eating”\n\n\n there are lots of other social media networks\n and in fact, social media just means any internet application where the user generates the content\n so things like blogs are in a way a kind of social media\n\n
  • \n
  • However, in graduate school I became very interested in communicating my science to non-scientists and the general public\n I was startled (to say the least) by how little most people know about what science has taught us about our natural world, \n in particular in regards climate change\n Here is an example survey question that was asked of the general public in 2011\n click 1 \n to the best of your knowledge, what proportion of climate scientists think that global warming is happening?\n click 2 \n those surveyed chose from several different percentage categories,\n displayed here on the x-axis\n any guess as to what the most popular answer was?\n\n Click 3 \n Most people don’t know, and only 13% of people chose the correct answer, 81-100%\n the exact percentage is 97% according to this survey\n\n\n
  • However, in graduate school I became very interested in communicating my science to non-scientists and the general public\n I was startled (to say the least) by how little most people know about what science has taught us about our natural world, \n in particular in regards climate change\n Here is an example survey question that was asked of the general public in 2011\n click 1 \n to the best of your knowledge, what proportion of climate scientists think that global warming is happening?\n click 2 \n those surveyed chose from several different percentage categories,\n displayed here on the x-axis\n any guess as to what the most popular answer was?\n\n Click 3 \n Most people don’t know, and only 13% of people chose the correct answer, 81-100%\n the exact percentage is 97% according to this survey\n\n\n
  • However, in graduate school I became very interested in communicating my science to non-scientists and the general public\n I was startled (to say the least) by how little most people know about what science has taught us about our natural world, \n in particular in regards climate change\n Here is an example survey question that was asked of the general public in 2011\n click 1 \n to the best of your knowledge, what proportion of climate scientists think that global warming is happening?\n click 2 \n those surveyed chose from several different percentage categories,\n displayed here on the x-axis\n any guess as to what the most popular answer was?\n\n Click 3 \n Most people don’t know, and only 13% of people chose the correct answer, 81-100%\n the exact percentage is 97% according to this survey\n\n\n
  • However, in graduate school I became very interested in communicating my science to non-scientists and the general public\n I was startled (to say the least) by how little most people know about what science has taught us about our natural world, \n in particular in regards climate change\n Here is an example survey question that was asked of the general public in 2011\n click 1 \n to the best of your knowledge, what proportion of climate scientists think that global warming is happening?\n click 2 \n those surveyed chose from several different percentage categories,\n displayed here on the x-axis\n any guess as to what the most popular answer was?\n\n Click 3 \n Most people don’t know, and only 13% of people chose the correct answer, 81-100%\n the exact percentage is 97% according to this survey\n\n\n
  • \n
  • Then, I met a woman named Liz Neeley at a meet and greet on UW campus\n She trains scientists to be better communicators with a group called COMPASS\n I asked her “Liz, I really care about the lack of science literacy I’m seeing. What can I do to be a better science communicator?”\n She asked me “Are you using twitter?”\n I said “No, of course not” startled by this silly question\n then she said\n CLICK 1\n “Why not?”\n and honestly, I could not think of a good answer.\n I’m a scientist, so I realized that my bias against social media really didn’t have much supporting evidence\n so i decided to put my previous judgements aside and examine social media in a new light\n And this was where my “social media enlightenment” began\n\n
  • Then, I met a woman named Liz Neeley at a meet and greet on UW campus\n She trains scientists to be better communicators with a group called COMPASS\n I asked her “Liz, I really care about the lack of science literacy I’m seeing. What can I do to be a better science communicator?”\n She asked me “Are you using twitter?”\n I said “No, of course not” startled by this silly question\n then she said\n CLICK 1\n “Why not?”\n and honestly, I could not think of a good answer.\n I’m a scientist, so I realized that my bias against social media really didn’t have much supporting evidence\n so i decided to put my previous judgements aside and examine social media in a new light\n And this was where my “social media enlightenment” began\n\n
  • Then, I met a woman named Liz Neeley at a meet and greet on UW campus\n She trains scientists to be better communicators with a group called COMPASS\n I asked her “Liz, I really care about the lack of science literacy I’m seeing. What can I do to be a better science communicator?”\n She asked me “Are you using twitter?”\n I said “No, of course not” startled by this silly question\n then she said\n CLICK 1\n “Why not?”\n and honestly, I could not think of a good answer.\n I’m a scientist, so I realized that my bias against social media really didn’t have much supporting evidence\n so i decided to put my previous judgements aside and examine social media in a new light\n And this was where my “social media enlightenment” began\n\n
  • Then, I met a woman named Liz Neeley at a meet and greet on UW campus\n She trains scientists to be better communicators with a group called COMPASS\n I asked her “Liz, I really care about the lack of science literacy I’m seeing. What can I do to be a better science communicator?”\n She asked me “Are you using twitter?”\n I said “No, of course not” startled by this silly question\n then she said\n CLICK 1\n “Why not?”\n and honestly, I could not think of a good answer.\n I’m a scientist, so I realized that my bias against social media really didn’t have much supporting evidence\n so i decided to put my previous judgements aside and examine social media in a new light\n And this was where my “social media enlightenment” began\n\n
  • I realized that the popularity of social media had skyrocketed in the past few years, \n especially facebook and twitter, \nthe two most popular networks\n this is data from 2011, \nbut as of 2012, facebook has reached 1 billion users, \nand twitter 600 million, \nwith 340 million tweets per day\n whether I liked it or not, \nsocial media is now a major form of communication. \n whatever audience you want to reach, \nchances are, they are there.\n If I wanted to reach more of the general public, \nthis was the appropriate venue\n\n
  • so let’s talk about facebook and twitter, the two most popular networks \n how many people use facebook? how many people use twitter? how many people use them for communicating science?\n the first main difference between these two networks is their character limit\n\nROW 1 - characters\n click 1\n facebook has essentially no character limit\n click 2 \n twitter has 140. \n this was designed by the twitter creators so that people could use text messaging to post to twitter, \n and texts are limited to 160 characters\n while this may seem like too little room to convey much information, \n it has several benefits\n 1. people must be concise, \n you can find more of what you are looking for in a shorter amount of time, \n and don’t have to wade through verbose junk\n 2. the meaty stuff doesn’t have to be in the tweet - \n using tweets to link to other websites, like blogs, can increase their traffic substantially\n \n ROW 2 - friends followers\n click 3\n next, on facebook, your connections are called “friends\n you request to be somebody’s friend, \n and they have to approve that request to finalize the connection\n click 4 \n on twitter, you have followers. \n there is no confirmation step to follow somebody on twitter, \n you can follow whoever you want, and anybody can follow you\n the benefit of this is that you can make new connections very easily\n \n ROW 3 - real life friends\n click 5 \n so as a result, your connections on facebook tend to be people you really know, \n or at least have met in real life\n click 6 \n but on twitter you can be connected with people you have never met, \n there is much potential to expand your network\n\n ROW 4 - privacy settings\n click 7 \n on this same vein, facebook has a complicated array of privacy settings to allow you to hide portions of your profile from groups of people\n click 8 \n on twitter, most things are public, \n there are a couple privacy settings we can discuss later if you are interested\n \n ROW 5 - \n click 9 \n finally, facebook is a traditional site, \n meaning you can share links, pictures, videos, comment on other’s posts, create events and make pages for your business, etc\n click 10 \n wheras twitter is limited to just links, pictures and video\n\n
  • so let’s talk about facebook and twitter, the two most popular networks \n how many people use facebook? how many people use twitter? how many people use them for communicating science?\n the first main difference between these two networks is their character limit\n\nROW 1 - characters\n click 1\n facebook has essentially no character limit\n click 2 \n twitter has 140. \n this was designed by the twitter creators so that people could use text messaging to post to twitter, \n and texts are limited to 160 characters\n while this may seem like too little room to convey much information, \n it has several benefits\n 1. people must be concise, \n you can find more of what you are looking for in a shorter amount of time, \n and don’t have to wade through verbose junk\n 2. the meaty stuff doesn’t have to be in the tweet - \n using tweets to link to other websites, like blogs, can increase their traffic substantially\n \n ROW 2 - friends followers\n click 3\n next, on facebook, your connections are called “friends\n you request to be somebody’s friend, \n and they have to approve that request to finalize the connection\n click 4 \n on twitter, you have followers. \n there is no confirmation step to follow somebody on twitter, \n you can follow whoever you want, and anybody can follow you\n the benefit of this is that you can make new connections very easily\n \n ROW 3 - real life friends\n click 5 \n so as a result, your connections on facebook tend to be people you really know, \n or at least have met in real life\n click 6 \n but on twitter you can be connected with people you have never met, \n there is much potential to expand your network\n\n ROW 4 - privacy settings\n click 7 \n on this same vein, facebook has a complicated array of privacy settings to allow you to hide portions of your profile from groups of people\n click 8 \n on twitter, most things are public, \n there are a couple privacy settings we can discuss later if you are interested\n \n ROW 5 - \n click 9 \n finally, facebook is a traditional site, \n meaning you can share links, pictures, videos, comment on other’s posts, create events and make pages for your business, etc\n click 10 \n wheras twitter is limited to just links, pictures and video\n\n
  • so let’s talk about facebook and twitter, the two most popular networks \n how many people use facebook? how many people use twitter? how many people use them for communicating science?\n the first main difference between these two networks is their character limit\n\nROW 1 - characters\n click 1\n facebook has essentially no character limit\n click 2 \n twitter has 140. \n this was designed by the twitter creators so that people could use text messaging to post to twitter, \n and texts are limited to 160 characters\n while this may seem like too little room to convey much information, \n it has several benefits\n 1. people must be concise, \n you can find more of what you are looking for in a shorter amount of time, \n and don’t have to wade through verbose junk\n 2. the meaty stuff doesn’t have to be in the tweet - \n using tweets to link to other websites, like blogs, can increase their traffic substantially\n \n ROW 2 - friends followers\n click 3\n next, on facebook, your connections are called “friends\n you request to be somebody’s friend, \n and they have to approve that request to finalize the connection\n click 4 \n on twitter, you have followers. \n there is no confirmation step to follow somebody on twitter, \n you can follow whoever you want, and anybody can follow you\n the benefit of this is that you can make new connections very easily\n \n ROW 3 - real life friends\n click 5 \n so as a result, your connections on facebook tend to be people you really know, \n or at least have met in real life\n click 6 \n but on twitter you can be connected with people you have never met, \n there is much potential to expand your network\n\n ROW 4 - privacy settings\n click 7 \n on this same vein, facebook has a complicated array of privacy settings to allow you to hide portions of your profile from groups of people\n click 8 \n on twitter, most things are public, \n there are a couple privacy settings we can discuss later if you are interested\n \n ROW 5 - \n click 9 \n finally, facebook is a traditional site, \n meaning you can share links, pictures, videos, comment on other’s posts, create events and make pages for your business, etc\n click 10 \n wheras twitter is limited to just links, pictures and video\n\n
  • so let’s talk about facebook and twitter, the two most popular networks \n how many people use facebook? how many people use twitter? how many people use them for communicating science?\n the first main difference between these two networks is their character limit\n\nROW 1 - characters\n click 1\n facebook has essentially no character limit\n click 2 \n twitter has 140. \n this was designed by the twitter creators so that people could use text messaging to post to twitter, \n and texts are limited to 160 characters\n while this may seem like too little room to convey much information, \n it has several benefits\n 1. people must be concise, \n you can find more of what you are looking for in a shorter amount of time, \n and don’t have to wade through verbose junk\n 2. the meaty stuff doesn’t have to be in the tweet - \n using tweets to link to other websites, like blogs, can increase their traffic substantially\n \n ROW 2 - friends followers\n click 3\n next, on facebook, your connections are called “friends\n you request to be somebody’s friend, \n and they have to approve that request to finalize the connection\n click 4 \n on twitter, you have followers. \n there is no confirmation step to follow somebody on twitter, \n you can follow whoever you want, and anybody can follow you\n the benefit of this is that you can make new connections very easily\n \n ROW 3 - real life friends\n click 5 \n so as a result, your connections on facebook tend to be people you really know, \n or at least have met in real life\n click 6 \n but on twitter you can be connected with people you have never met, \n there is much potential to expand your network\n\n ROW 4 - privacy settings\n click 7 \n on this same vein, facebook has a complicated array of privacy settings to allow you to hide portions of your profile from groups of people\n click 8 \n on twitter, most things are public, \n there are a couple privacy settings we can discuss later if you are interested\n \n ROW 5 - \n click 9 \n finally, facebook is a traditional site, \n meaning you can share links, pictures, videos, comment on other’s posts, create events and make pages for your business, etc\n click 10 \n wheras twitter is limited to just links, pictures and video\n\n
  • so let’s talk about facebook and twitter, the two most popular networks \n how many people use facebook? how many people use twitter? how many people use them for communicating science?\n the first main difference between these two networks is their character limit\n\nROW 1 - characters\n click 1\n facebook has essentially no character limit\n click 2 \n twitter has 140. \n this was designed by the twitter creators so that people could use text messaging to post to twitter, \n and texts are limited to 160 characters\n while this may seem like too little room to convey much information, \n it has several benefits\n 1. people must be concise, \n you can find more of what you are looking for in a shorter amount of time, \n and don’t have to wade through verbose junk\n 2. the meaty stuff doesn’t have to be in the tweet - \n using tweets to link to other websites, like blogs, can increase their traffic substantially\n \n ROW 2 - friends followers\n click 3\n next, on facebook, your connections are called “friends\n you request to be somebody’s friend, \n and they have to approve that request to finalize the connection\n click 4 \n on twitter, you have followers. \n there is no confirmation step to follow somebody on twitter, \n you can follow whoever you want, and anybody can follow you\n the benefit of this is that you can make new connections very easily\n \n ROW 3 - real life friends\n click 5 \n so as a result, your connections on facebook tend to be people you really know, \n or at least have met in real life\n click 6 \n but on twitter you can be connected with people you have never met, \n there is much potential to expand your network\n\n ROW 4 - privacy settings\n click 7 \n on this same vein, facebook has a complicated array of privacy settings to allow you to hide portions of your profile from groups of people\n click 8 \n on twitter, most things are public, \n there are a couple privacy settings we can discuss later if you are interested\n \n ROW 5 - \n click 9 \n finally, facebook is a traditional site, \n meaning you can share links, pictures, videos, comment on other’s posts, create events and make pages for your business, etc\n click 10 \n wheras twitter is limited to just links, pictures and video\n\n
  • so let’s talk about facebook and twitter, the two most popular networks \n how many people use facebook? how many people use twitter? how many people use them for communicating science?\n the first main difference between these two networks is their character limit\n\nROW 1 - characters\n click 1\n facebook has essentially no character limit\n click 2 \n twitter has 140. \n this was designed by the twitter creators so that people could use text messaging to post to twitter, \n and texts are limited to 160 characters\n while this may seem like too little room to convey much information, \n it has several benefits\n 1. people must be concise, \n you can find more of what you are looking for in a shorter amount of time, \n and don’t have to wade through verbose junk\n 2. the meaty stuff doesn’t have to be in the tweet - \n using tweets to link to other websites, like blogs, can increase their traffic substantially\n \n ROW 2 - friends followers\n click 3\n next, on facebook, your connections are called “friends\n you request to be somebody’s friend, \n and they have to approve that request to finalize the connection\n click 4 \n on twitter, you have followers. \n there is no confirmation step to follow somebody on twitter, \n you can follow whoever you want, and anybody can follow you\n the benefit of this is that you can make new connections very easily\n \n ROW 3 - real life friends\n click 5 \n so as a result, your connections on facebook tend to be people you really know, \n or at least have met in real life\n click 6 \n but on twitter you can be connected with people you have never met, \n there is much potential to expand your network\n\n ROW 4 - privacy settings\n click 7 \n on this same vein, facebook has a complicated array of privacy settings to allow you to hide portions of your profile from groups of people\n click 8 \n on twitter, most things are public, \n there are a couple privacy settings we can discuss later if you are interested\n \n ROW 5 - \n click 9 \n finally, facebook is a traditional site, \n meaning you can share links, pictures, videos, comment on other’s posts, create events and make pages for your business, etc\n click 10 \n wheras twitter is limited to just links, pictures and video\n\n
  • so let’s talk about facebook and twitter, the two most popular networks \n how many people use facebook? how many people use twitter? how many people use them for communicating science?\n the first main difference between these two networks is their character limit\n\nROW 1 - characters\n click 1\n facebook has essentially no character limit\n click 2 \n twitter has 140. \n this was designed by the twitter creators so that people could use text messaging to post to twitter, \n and texts are limited to 160 characters\n while this may seem like too little room to convey much information, \n it has several benefits\n 1. people must be concise, \n you can find more of what you are looking for in a shorter amount of time, \n and don’t have to wade through verbose junk\n 2. the meaty stuff doesn’t have to be in the tweet - \n using tweets to link to other websites, like blogs, can increase their traffic substantially\n \n ROW 2 - friends followers\n click 3\n next, on facebook, your connections are called “friends\n you request to be somebody’s friend, \n and they have to approve that request to finalize the connection\n click 4 \n on twitter, you have followers. \n there is no confirmation step to follow somebody on twitter, \n you can follow whoever you want, and anybody can follow you\n the benefit of this is that you can make new connections very easily\n \n ROW 3 - real life friends\n click 5 \n so as a result, your connections on facebook tend to be people you really know, \n or at least have met in real life\n click 6 \n but on twitter you can be connected with people you have never met, \n there is much potential to expand your network\n\n ROW 4 - privacy settings\n click 7 \n on this same vein, facebook has a complicated array of privacy settings to allow you to hide portions of your profile from groups of people\n click 8 \n on twitter, most things are public, \n there are a couple privacy settings we can discuss later if you are interested\n \n ROW 5 - \n click 9 \n finally, facebook is a traditional site, \n meaning you can share links, pictures, videos, comment on other’s posts, create events and make pages for your business, etc\n click 10 \n wheras twitter is limited to just links, pictures and video\n\n
  • so let’s talk about facebook and twitter, the two most popular networks \n how many people use facebook? how many people use twitter? how many people use them for communicating science?\n the first main difference between these two networks is their character limit\n\nROW 1 - characters\n click 1\n facebook has essentially no character limit\n click 2 \n twitter has 140. \n this was designed by the twitter creators so that people could use text messaging to post to twitter, \n and texts are limited to 160 characters\n while this may seem like too little room to convey much information, \n it has several benefits\n 1. people must be concise, \n you can find more of what you are looking for in a shorter amount of time, \n and don’t have to wade through verbose junk\n 2. the meaty stuff doesn’t have to be in the tweet - \n using tweets to link to other websites, like blogs, can increase their traffic substantially\n \n ROW 2 - friends followers\n click 3\n next, on facebook, your connections are called “friends\n you request to be somebody’s friend, \n and they have to approve that request to finalize the connection\n click 4 \n on twitter, you have followers. \n there is no confirmation step to follow somebody on twitter, \n you can follow whoever you want, and anybody can follow you\n the benefit of this is that you can make new connections very easily\n \n ROW 3 - real life friends\n click 5 \n so as a result, your connections on facebook tend to be people you really know, \n or at least have met in real life\n click 6 \n but on twitter you can be connected with people you have never met, \n there is much potential to expand your network\n\n ROW 4 - privacy settings\n click 7 \n on this same vein, facebook has a complicated array of privacy settings to allow you to hide portions of your profile from groups of people\n click 8 \n on twitter, most things are public, \n there are a couple privacy settings we can discuss later if you are interested\n \n ROW 5 - \n click 9 \n finally, facebook is a traditional site, \n meaning you can share links, pictures, videos, comment on other’s posts, create events and make pages for your business, etc\n click 10 \n wheras twitter is limited to just links, pictures and video\n\n
  • so let’s talk about facebook and twitter, the two most popular networks \n how many people use facebook? how many people use twitter? how many people use them for communicating science?\n the first main difference between these two networks is their character limit\n\nROW 1 - characters\n click 1\n facebook has essentially no character limit\n click 2 \n twitter has 140. \n this was designed by the twitter creators so that people could use text messaging to post to twitter, \n and texts are limited to 160 characters\n while this may seem like too little room to convey much information, \n it has several benefits\n 1. people must be concise, \n you can find more of what you are looking for in a shorter amount of time, \n and don’t have to wade through verbose junk\n 2. the meaty stuff doesn’t have to be in the tweet - \n using tweets to link to other websites, like blogs, can increase their traffic substantially\n \n ROW 2 - friends followers\n click 3\n next, on facebook, your connections are called “friends\n you request to be somebody’s friend, \n and they have to approve that request to finalize the connection\n click 4 \n on twitter, you have followers. \n there is no confirmation step to follow somebody on twitter, \n you can follow whoever you want, and anybody can follow you\n the benefit of this is that you can make new connections very easily\n \n ROW 3 - real life friends\n click 5 \n so as a result, your connections on facebook tend to be people you really know, \n or at least have met in real life\n click 6 \n but on twitter you can be connected with people you have never met, \n there is much potential to expand your network\n\n ROW 4 - privacy settings\n click 7 \n on this same vein, facebook has a complicated array of privacy settings to allow you to hide portions of your profile from groups of people\n click 8 \n on twitter, most things are public, \n there are a couple privacy settings we can discuss later if you are interested\n \n ROW 5 - \n click 9 \n finally, facebook is a traditional site, \n meaning you can share links, pictures, videos, comment on other’s posts, create events and make pages for your business, etc\n click 10 \n wheras twitter is limited to just links, pictures and video\n\n
  • so let’s talk about facebook and twitter, the two most popular networks \n how many people use facebook? how many people use twitter? how many people use them for communicating science?\n the first main difference between these two networks is their character limit\n\nROW 1 - characters\n click 1\n facebook has essentially no character limit\n click 2 \n twitter has 140. \n this was designed by the twitter creators so that people could use text messaging to post to twitter, \n and texts are limited to 160 characters\n while this may seem like too little room to convey much information, \n it has several benefits\n 1. people must be concise, \n you can find more of what you are looking for in a shorter amount of time, \n and don’t have to wade through verbose junk\n 2. the meaty stuff doesn’t have to be in the tweet - \n using tweets to link to other websites, like blogs, can increase their traffic substantially\n \n ROW 2 - friends followers\n click 3\n next, on facebook, your connections are called “friends\n you request to be somebody’s friend, \n and they have to approve that request to finalize the connection\n click 4 \n on twitter, you have followers. \n there is no confirmation step to follow somebody on twitter, \n you can follow whoever you want, and anybody can follow you\n the benefit of this is that you can make new connections very easily\n \n ROW 3 - real life friends\n click 5 \n so as a result, your connections on facebook tend to be people you really know, \n or at least have met in real life\n click 6 \n but on twitter you can be connected with people you have never met, \n there is much potential to expand your network\n\n ROW 4 - privacy settings\n click 7 \n on this same vein, facebook has a complicated array of privacy settings to allow you to hide portions of your profile from groups of people\n click 8 \n on twitter, most things are public, \n there are a couple privacy settings we can discuss later if you are interested\n \n ROW 5 - \n click 9 \n finally, facebook is a traditional site, \n meaning you can share links, pictures, videos, comment on other’s posts, create events and make pages for your business, etc\n click 10 \n wheras twitter is limited to just links, pictures and video\n\n
  • An excellent metaphor I’ve heard comparing facebook and twitter is this\n Click 1\n facebook is like hanging out with a group of close friends,\n you are laughing, talking about you day, your talking about how you feel, it’s a very emotional place\n click 2\n twitter is more like a cocktail party\n there are multiple conversations taking place at once,\n and this results in a cacophony of chitchat\n some people thrive in this environment, \n while others are jarred,\n but we all go to cocktail parties for a specific purpose: \n to hear the interesting stuff about our careers\n it’s also been said that twitter is the place where you meet the people you would want to have a drink with\n and facebook is full of people you want to throw a drink at\n
  • An excellent metaphor I’ve heard comparing facebook and twitter is this\n Click 1\n facebook is like hanging out with a group of close friends,\n you are laughing, talking about you day, your talking about how you feel, it’s a very emotional place\n click 2\n twitter is more like a cocktail party\n there are multiple conversations taking place at once,\n and this results in a cacophony of chitchat\n some people thrive in this environment, \n while others are jarred,\n but we all go to cocktail parties for a specific purpose: \n to hear the interesting stuff about our careers\n it’s also been said that twitter is the place where you meet the people you would want to have a drink with\n and facebook is full of people you want to throw a drink at\n
  • so that sounds great, but how is this specifically useful to scientists? \n I’ll give you a quick overview here and we’ll go into more detail in a bit\n\n click 1\n you can learn by on twitter by eavesdropping - \n follow informative people and see what they are talking about\n you can crowd-source info from your followers - \n ask them a question and see what they come up with\n you can even collect data with twitter -\n a north carolina sea grant study gathered data on recreational fishermen’s catch and effort by having them send text messages to twitter\n\n click 2 \n you can teach on twitter by sharing resources - \n you can link to interesting articles, talk about events in you field, etc\n you can tell stories on twitter - \n for example, some scientists will tweet while on a field expedition\n you can discuss and debate with people on twitter, even correct misinformation\n\n click 3\n finally, you can network on twitter by striking up a conversation and beginning to build a relationship with a new person\n over time, these relationships can become deeper and you can begin to feel a sense of community with the people you tweet with\n this last category is perhaps the most important, and in fact should come first\n\n click 4\n that’s because you can’t effectively learn or teach without first building relationships with the people you follow and your followers\n\n
  • so that sounds great, but how is this specifically useful to scientists? \n I’ll give you a quick overview here and we’ll go into more detail in a bit\n\n click 1\n you can learn by on twitter by eavesdropping - \n follow informative people and see what they are talking about\n you can crowd-source info from your followers - \n ask them a question and see what they come up with\n you can even collect data with twitter -\n a north carolina sea grant study gathered data on recreational fishermen’s catch and effort by having them send text messages to twitter\n\n click 2 \n you can teach on twitter by sharing resources - \n you can link to interesting articles, talk about events in you field, etc\n you can tell stories on twitter - \n for example, some scientists will tweet while on a field expedition\n you can discuss and debate with people on twitter, even correct misinformation\n\n click 3\n finally, you can network on twitter by striking up a conversation and beginning to build a relationship with a new person\n over time, these relationships can become deeper and you can begin to feel a sense of community with the people you tweet with\n this last category is perhaps the most important, and in fact should come first\n\n click 4\n that’s because you can’t effectively learn or teach without first building relationships with the people you follow and your followers\n\n
  • so that sounds great, but how is this specifically useful to scientists? \n I’ll give you a quick overview here and we’ll go into more detail in a bit\n\n click 1\n you can learn by on twitter by eavesdropping - \n follow informative people and see what they are talking about\n you can crowd-source info from your followers - \n ask them a question and see what they come up with\n you can even collect data with twitter -\n a north carolina sea grant study gathered data on recreational fishermen’s catch and effort by having them send text messages to twitter\n\n click 2 \n you can teach on twitter by sharing resources - \n you can link to interesting articles, talk about events in you field, etc\n you can tell stories on twitter - \n for example, some scientists will tweet while on a field expedition\n you can discuss and debate with people on twitter, even correct misinformation\n\n click 3\n finally, you can network on twitter by striking up a conversation and beginning to build a relationship with a new person\n over time, these relationships can become deeper and you can begin to feel a sense of community with the people you tweet with\n this last category is perhaps the most important, and in fact should come first\n\n click 4\n that’s because you can’t effectively learn or teach without first building relationships with the people you follow and your followers\n\n
  • so that sounds great, but how is this specifically useful to scientists? \n I’ll give you a quick overview here and we’ll go into more detail in a bit\n\n click 1\n you can learn by on twitter by eavesdropping - \n follow informative people and see what they are talking about\n you can crowd-source info from your followers - \n ask them a question and see what they come up with\n you can even collect data with twitter -\n a north carolina sea grant study gathered data on recreational fishermen’s catch and effort by having them send text messages to twitter\n\n click 2 \n you can teach on twitter by sharing resources - \n you can link to interesting articles, talk about events in you field, etc\n you can tell stories on twitter - \n for example, some scientists will tweet while on a field expedition\n you can discuss and debate with people on twitter, even correct misinformation\n\n click 3\n finally, you can network on twitter by striking up a conversation and beginning to build a relationship with a new person\n over time, these relationships can become deeper and you can begin to feel a sense of community with the people you tweet with\n this last category is perhaps the most important, and in fact should come first\n\n click 4\n that’s because you can’t effectively learn or teach without first building relationships with the people you follow and your followers\n\n
  • so that sounds great, but how is this specifically useful to scientists? \n I’ll give you a quick overview here and we’ll go into more detail in a bit\n\n click 1\n you can learn by on twitter by eavesdropping - \n follow informative people and see what they are talking about\n you can crowd-source info from your followers - \n ask them a question and see what they come up with\n you can even collect data with twitter -\n a north carolina sea grant study gathered data on recreational fishermen’s catch and effort by having them send text messages to twitter\n\n click 2 \n you can teach on twitter by sharing resources - \n you can link to interesting articles, talk about events in you field, etc\n you can tell stories on twitter - \n for example, some scientists will tweet while on a field expedition\n you can discuss and debate with people on twitter, even correct misinformation\n\n click 3\n finally, you can network on twitter by striking up a conversation and beginning to build a relationship with a new person\n over time, these relationships can become deeper and you can begin to feel a sense of community with the people you tweet with\n this last category is perhaps the most important, and in fact should come first\n\n click 4\n that’s because you can’t effectively learn or teach without first building relationships with the people you follow and your followers\n\n
  • so that sounds great, but how is this specifically useful to scientists? \n I’ll give you a quick overview here and we’ll go into more detail in a bit\n\n click 1\n you can learn by on twitter by eavesdropping - \n follow informative people and see what they are talking about\n you can crowd-source info from your followers - \n ask them a question and see what they come up with\n you can even collect data with twitter -\n a north carolina sea grant study gathered data on recreational fishermen’s catch and effort by having them send text messages to twitter\n\n click 2 \n you can teach on twitter by sharing resources - \n you can link to interesting articles, talk about events in you field, etc\n you can tell stories on twitter - \n for example, some scientists will tweet while on a field expedition\n you can discuss and debate with people on twitter, even correct misinformation\n\n click 3\n finally, you can network on twitter by striking up a conversation and beginning to build a relationship with a new person\n over time, these relationships can become deeper and you can begin to feel a sense of community with the people you tweet with\n this last category is perhaps the most important, and in fact should come first\n\n click 4\n that’s because you can’t effectively learn or teach without first building relationships with the people you follow and your followers\n\n
  • so that sounds great, but how is this specifically useful to scientists? \n I’ll give you a quick overview here and we’ll go into more detail in a bit\n\n click 1\n you can learn by on twitter by eavesdropping - \n follow informative people and see what they are talking about\n you can crowd-source info from your followers - \n ask them a question and see what they come up with\n you can even collect data with twitter -\n a north carolina sea grant study gathered data on recreational fishermen’s catch and effort by having them send text messages to twitter\n\n click 2 \n you can teach on twitter by sharing resources - \n you can link to interesting articles, talk about events in you field, etc\n you can tell stories on twitter - \n for example, some scientists will tweet while on a field expedition\n you can discuss and debate with people on twitter, even correct misinformation\n\n click 3\n finally, you can network on twitter by striking up a conversation and beginning to build a relationship with a new person\n over time, these relationships can become deeper and you can begin to feel a sense of community with the people you tweet with\n this last category is perhaps the most important, and in fact should come first\n\n click 4\n that’s because you can’t effectively learn or teach without first building relationships with the people you follow and your followers\n\n
  • and this is the essence of social media itself\n click 1\n in traditional media, the conversation is usually one-way \n from the source to the consumer\n click 2\n social media is a two way conversation,\n click 3\n or even a multi way conversation -\n click 4\n and it’s easy to re-share what somebody has shared with you, \n so information can travel far in a short amount of time \n this is what makes social media incredibly powerful, \nand why it has revolutionized the way consume media, and the way we communicate\n
  • and this is the essence of social media itself\n click 1\n in traditional media, the conversation is usually one-way \n from the source to the consumer\n click 2\n social media is a two way conversation,\n click 3\n or even a multi way conversation -\n click 4\n and it’s easy to re-share what somebody has shared with you, \n so information can travel far in a short amount of time \n this is what makes social media incredibly powerful, \nand why it has revolutionized the way consume media, and the way we communicate\n
  • and this is the essence of social media itself\n click 1\n in traditional media, the conversation is usually one-way \n from the source to the consumer\n click 2\n social media is a two way conversation,\n click 3\n or even a multi way conversation -\n click 4\n and it’s easy to re-share what somebody has shared with you, \n so information can travel far in a short amount of time \n this is what makes social media incredibly powerful, \nand why it has revolutionized the way consume media, and the way we communicate\n
  • and this is the essence of social media itself\n click 1\n in traditional media, the conversation is usually one-way \n from the source to the consumer\n click 2\n social media is a two way conversation,\n click 3\n or even a multi way conversation -\n click 4\n and it’s easy to re-share what somebody has shared with you, \n so information can travel far in a short amount of time \n this is what makes social media incredibly powerful, \nand why it has revolutionized the way consume media, and the way we communicate\n
  • Now I’m going to introduce to you some of the interesting scientists \n who showed me how useful twitter and social media really is\n i’m going to focus on their use of twitter,\n because this happens to be my favorite social network\n in case you couldn’t tell\n and it’s short format is well suited for a talk like this\n i’m going show you some of the things they “tweet” which is what we call when you share something on twitter\n but there are two pieces of jargon you need to know\n the first is twitter “handles”\n\n click 1 \n this is just your username. \n they are preceeded by the @ symbol, \n and are best when short, memorable, and not hard to spell\n the next is the hashtag\n\n click 2\n this conference has a hashtag that we have been using \n this is like a “keyword”\n you can search for hashtags using twitter search function and find all the tweets that used that hashtag\n there is no central authority on hashtags, \n they are self-organized\n and in fact you can put a pound symbol in front of any word to make it a hashtag\n but it’s best to check and see who is using it for what purpose first\n in the third talk in this workshop, jessie will go into more detail about these terms\n\n
  • \n
  • Neil de Grasse Tyson is perhaps my favorite “tweep” as we call our twitter followers\n he is an astrophysicist, author, radio show host, and all around amazing science communicator and story-teller\n he has even testified in front of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation \n on the economic, cultural, and social benefits of space exploration\n he knows that his discipline is frequently misunderstood by the public \n and it’s funding is at an all time low\n so he uses twitter to help spread the word about space and physics\n click 1\n saying “I’m just trying to create a place where the twitterverse meets the universe”\n\n\n
  • Neil tweets informative, concise, catchy lymrics about his area of study\n\n click 1\n he engages his followers by responding to questions and using humor,\n here saying that if the world stopped spinning you would roll east at 900mph\n\n click 2\n he relates his science to things that his audience is interested in, \n here pointing out the physics of baseball\n\n click 3\n he corrects misinformation about science,\n here saying that a flux capacitator is not actually a real thing\n in sum, all these short bursts of information are accesible, engaging, and build support for his field of study\n
  • Neil tweets informative, concise, catchy lymrics about his area of study\n\n click 1\n he engages his followers by responding to questions and using humor,\n here saying that if the world stopped spinning you would roll east at 900mph\n\n click 2\n he relates his science to things that his audience is interested in, \n here pointing out the physics of baseball\n\n click 3\n he corrects misinformation about science,\n here saying that a flux capacitator is not actually a real thing\n in sum, all these short bursts of information are accesible, engaging, and build support for his field of study\n
  • Neil tweets informative, concise, catchy lymrics about his area of study\n\n click 1\n he engages his followers by responding to questions and using humor,\n here saying that if the world stopped spinning you would roll east at 900mph\n\n click 2\n he relates his science to things that his audience is interested in, \n here pointing out the physics of baseball\n\n click 3\n he corrects misinformation about science,\n here saying that a flux capacitator is not actually a real thing\n in sum, all these short bursts of information are accesible, engaging, and build support for his field of study\n
  • Neil tweets informative, concise, catchy lymrics about his area of study\n\n click 1\n he engages his followers by responding to questions and using humor,\n here saying that if the world stopped spinning you would roll east at 900mph\n\n click 2\n he relates his science to things that his audience is interested in, \n here pointing out the physics of baseball\n\n click 3\n he corrects misinformation about science,\n here saying that a flux capacitator is not actually a real thing\n in sum, all these short bursts of information are accesible, engaging, and build support for his field of study\n
  • Neil is such a pro-tweeter that he has even tweeted from the While house “twitter situation room” with Bill Nye the Science Guy\n Neil is somewhat of a celebrity and it seems he has a natural knack for communiation and twitter\n but, you don’t have to be a celebrity to reap the benefits of twitter\n
  • \n
  • This is Joshua Drew, he is a post-doc an the field museum of natural history in chicago\n he is your everyday scientist studying biodiversity in the indo-pacific\n click 1\n Josh is a great example of somebody who loves twitter for community - \n twitter has helped him communicate and collaborate with a widespread community of scientists\n
  • On twitter, he tactfully shares his work and asks for feedback\n\n click 1\n he shares resources with his followers, such as carl zimmer’s free ebook \n\n click 2\n Some of my first conversations with him on twitter were under the hashtag friday night science\n which is where hard working scientists socialize late on friday night\n and commiserate about their lack of a life\n\n click 3\n and he just genuinely gets to know new scientists, \n here talking with someone about how he had a hard time getting proposals funded\n\n
  • On twitter, he tactfully shares his work and asks for feedback\n\n click 1\n he shares resources with his followers, such as carl zimmer’s free ebook \n\n click 2\n Some of my first conversations with him on twitter were under the hashtag friday night science\n which is where hard working scientists socialize late on friday night\n and commiserate about their lack of a life\n\n click 3\n and he just genuinely gets to know new scientists, \n here talking with someone about how he had a hard time getting proposals funded\n\n
  • On twitter, he tactfully shares his work and asks for feedback\n\n click 1\n he shares resources with his followers, such as carl zimmer’s free ebook \n\n click 2\n Some of my first conversations with him on twitter were under the hashtag friday night science\n which is where hard working scientists socialize late on friday night\n and commiserate about their lack of a life\n\n click 3\n and he just genuinely gets to know new scientists, \n here talking with someone about how he had a hard time getting proposals funded\n\n
  • On twitter, he tactfully shares his work and asks for feedback\n\n click 1\n he shares resources with his followers, such as carl zimmer’s free ebook \n\n click 2\n Some of my first conversations with him on twitter were under the hashtag friday night science\n which is where hard working scientists socialize late on friday night\n and commiserate about their lack of a life\n\n click 3\n and he just genuinely gets to know new scientists, \n here talking with someone about how he had a hard time getting proposals funded\n\n
  • he currently works at a field museum which holds lots of amazing scientific treasures that most people never get to see\n this is a picture of him laying down next to a shark tooth weapon from the oversized collection\n laser\n he is great about sharing these cool things, and also his experiences\n he even tweeted his 2011 expedition to Papua New Guinea, \n highlighting the kinds of work that museum researchers do \n and engaging the Field Museum’s audience into becoming more active members of their community\n
  • \n
  • Next up is Steven Roberts, and Assistant professor in my department\n Steven’s research is in genetics and shellfish\n and does something particularly interesting with his twitter activity\n he has both a personal account, \n and an account that is shared by the whole lab\n by sharing the twitter responsibilities between lab members,\n it helps lighten the burden on any one person \n\n click 1\n his social media philosophy is to increase the efficiency of his outreach efforts by sharing his teaching and research\n\n\n
  • Steven tweets about open data resources, \n such as this coral transcriptome repository\n using open science and open data hashtags so that people interested in these topics can search and find his tweets\n\n click 1\n he also uses twitter in the classroom - \n he shares resources with his biology of shellfishes class under the fish 310 hashtag\n\n click 2\n he crowd sources information from his followers, \n here asking if outreach needs to be incentivized or if it can become organically incorporated into the culture of academia\n\n click 3\n and on the lab twitter account, a fun example of a tweet linking to their “video of the week”\n
  • Steven tweets about open data resources, \n such as this coral transcriptome repository\n using open science and open data hashtags so that people interested in these topics can search and find his tweets\n\n click 1\n he also uses twitter in the classroom - \n he shares resources with his biology of shellfishes class under the fish 310 hashtag\n\n click 2\n he crowd sources information from his followers, \n here asking if outreach needs to be incentivized or if it can become organically incorporated into the culture of academia\n\n click 3\n and on the lab twitter account, a fun example of a tweet linking to their “video of the week”\n
  • Steven tweets about open data resources, \n such as this coral transcriptome repository\n using open science and open data hashtags so that people interested in these topics can search and find his tweets\n\n click 1\n he also uses twitter in the classroom - \n he shares resources with his biology of shellfishes class under the fish 310 hashtag\n\n click 2\n he crowd sources information from his followers, \n here asking if outreach needs to be incentivized or if it can become organically incorporated into the culture of academia\n\n click 3\n and on the lab twitter account, a fun example of a tweet linking to their “video of the week”\n
  • Steven tweets about open data resources, \n such as this coral transcriptome repository\n using open science and open data hashtags so that people interested in these topics can search and find his tweets\n\n click 1\n he also uses twitter in the classroom - \n he shares resources with his biology of shellfishes class under the fish 310 hashtag\n\n click 2\n he crowd sources information from his followers, \n here asking if outreach needs to be incentivized or if it can become organically incorporated into the culture of academia\n\n click 3\n and on the lab twitter account, a fun example of a tweet linking to their “video of the week”\n
  • which is of an octopus larvae\n something that we scientists may get to see in our everyday lives\n but to the wide world of people on the interwebs\n this stuff is new and highly engaging\n the opportunity to share this kind of media directly from the lab to the general public\n is made much easier through the use of social media\n
  • \n
  • the final twitter account i want to show you is highly creative\n it’s tweets from the point of view of a whale shark named Domino that has been satellite tagged\n pressing the buttons on the keyboard is a little tricky for this guy\n click 1\n so his friend Alistair Dove at the Georgia Aquarium helps him out\n he also blogs at deepseanews.com - a great blog I highly suggest you check out\n
  • because Domino is satellite tagged,\n Al can upload these cool tracks of where he’s been\n here’ one showing him just west of florida and cuba\n
  • he also tweets about how far he’s traveled, \n an astonishing 3500 miles since first tagged\n\n click 1\n he tweets domino’s surroundings, \n here puts the deep canyon that he is in \n in more relatable terms by saying it’s the depth of 4 empire state buildings\n\n click 2\n he tweets interesting facts about whale sharks\n such as the fact that they don’t have air spaces and so can travel very deep\n here creating a fun hash tag - ninja in the deep\n\n click 3\n another intersting fact he tweeted is that whale sharks eat plankton. \n he even created a clever little emoticon representing the whale sharks gaping mouth \n laser\n\n
  • he also tweets about how far he’s traveled, \n an astonishing 3500 miles since first tagged\n\n click 1\n he tweets domino’s surroundings, \n here puts the deep canyon that he is in \n in more relatable terms by saying it’s the depth of 4 empire state buildings\n\n click 2\n he tweets interesting facts about whale sharks\n such as the fact that they don’t have air spaces and so can travel very deep\n here creating a fun hash tag - ninja in the deep\n\n click 3\n another intersting fact he tweeted is that whale sharks eat plankton. \n he even created a clever little emoticon representing the whale sharks gaping mouth \n laser\n\n
  • he also tweets about how far he’s traveled, \n an astonishing 3500 miles since first tagged\n\n click 1\n he tweets domino’s surroundings, \n here puts the deep canyon that he is in \n in more relatable terms by saying it’s the depth of 4 empire state buildings\n\n click 2\n he tweets interesting facts about whale sharks\n such as the fact that they don’t have air spaces and so can travel very deep\n here creating a fun hash tag - ninja in the deep\n\n click 3\n another intersting fact he tweeted is that whale sharks eat plankton. \n he even created a clever little emoticon representing the whale sharks gaping mouth \n laser\n\n
  • another example of something his twitter followers have probably never seen\n this is exactly what it looks like\n and here he has used the humorous hash tag everybodypoops, \n and also the hashtag animals\n so that perhaps a young student on twitter wanting to find tweets about animals can find this interesting photo\n\n
  • \n
  • so i’ve shown you examples of scientists who are very active on twitter\n something else I’ve found is that there are a variety of social media styles found \n and they all can still have value\n listening, casual users can find interesting info\n and sharing or creating users can make meaningful connections\n\n click 1\n an example of a more casual user is Hans Rosling\n he is a professor of global health in Sweden\n\n click 2\n and you might know him from his highly engaging ted talk \n in which he uses his body to show changes in global health data over time\n in an interview, he was asked how busy scientists should be expected to maintain a social media presence\n\n click 3\n he responded that it doesn’t take much, just 1 tweet per day\n i would modify this a bit, and say you should have one reply per day\n because as I mentioned before, the value of social media is that it’s a 2-way\n and people tend to get bored with accounts that constantly blast info at them and don’t engage in conversation\n\n
  • so i’ve shown you examples of scientists who are very active on twitter\n something else I’ve found is that there are a variety of social media styles found \n and they all can still have value\n listening, casual users can find interesting info\n and sharing or creating users can make meaningful connections\n\n click 1\n an example of a more casual user is Hans Rosling\n he is a professor of global health in Sweden\n\n click 2\n and you might know him from his highly engaging ted talk \n in which he uses his body to show changes in global health data over time\n in an interview, he was asked how busy scientists should be expected to maintain a social media presence\n\n click 3\n he responded that it doesn’t take much, just 1 tweet per day\n i would modify this a bit, and say you should have one reply per day\n because as I mentioned before, the value of social media is that it’s a 2-way\n and people tend to get bored with accounts that constantly blast info at them and don’t engage in conversation\n\n
  • so i’ve shown you examples of scientists who are very active on twitter\n something else I’ve found is that there are a variety of social media styles found \n and they all can still have value\n listening, casual users can find interesting info\n and sharing or creating users can make meaningful connections\n\n click 1\n an example of a more casual user is Hans Rosling\n he is a professor of global health in Sweden\n\n click 2\n and you might know him from his highly engaging ted talk \n in which he uses his body to show changes in global health data over time\n in an interview, he was asked how busy scientists should be expected to maintain a social media presence\n\n click 3\n he responded that it doesn’t take much, just 1 tweet per day\n i would modify this a bit, and say you should have one reply per day\n because as I mentioned before, the value of social media is that it’s a 2-way\n and people tend to get bored with accounts that constantly blast info at them and don’t engage in conversation\n\n
  • so i’ve shown you examples of scientists who are very active on twitter\n something else I’ve found is that there are a variety of social media styles found \n and they all can still have value\n listening, casual users can find interesting info\n and sharing or creating users can make meaningful connections\n\n click 1\n an example of a more casual user is Hans Rosling\n he is a professor of global health in Sweden\n\n click 2\n and you might know him from his highly engaging ted talk \n in which he uses his body to show changes in global health data over time\n in an interview, he was asked how busy scientists should be expected to maintain a social media presence\n\n click 3\n he responded that it doesn’t take much, just 1 tweet per day\n i would modify this a bit, and say you should have one reply per day\n because as I mentioned before, the value of social media is that it’s a 2-way\n and people tend to get bored with accounts that constantly blast info at them and don’t engage in conversation\n\n
  • it’s twitter accounts like domino, steven roberts, josh drew, neil de grasse tyson, and hans rosling\n that convinced me that there are important things going on on twitter\n that social media has great value and power\n and that it’s not just all about donuts\n so this is how i use social media now\n my research is on coho salmon migration in puget sound\n click 1\n so my posts tend to have a fishy theme\n\n click 2\n on twitter i might share a link to an article i’m reading about salmon migration\n\n click 3\n on facebook, i like this interactive map showing tagged animals\n\n click 4\n on foursquare, this is where i do my field research\n\n click 5\n on instagram, here’s a picture of a coho i tagged\n\n click 6\n on youtube, here i am explaining my research\n\n click 7\n and on linkedin, my skills include tracking salmon\n
  • it’s twitter accounts like domino, steven roberts, josh drew, neil de grasse tyson, and hans rosling\n that convinced me that there are important things going on on twitter\n that social media has great value and power\n and that it’s not just all about donuts\n so this is how i use social media now\n my research is on coho salmon migration in puget sound\n click 1\n so my posts tend to have a fishy theme\n\n click 2\n on twitter i might share a link to an article i’m reading about salmon migration\n\n click 3\n on facebook, i like this interactive map showing tagged animals\n\n click 4\n on foursquare, this is where i do my field research\n\n click 5\n on instagram, here’s a picture of a coho i tagged\n\n click 6\n on youtube, here i am explaining my research\n\n click 7\n and on linkedin, my skills include tracking salmon\n
  • it’s twitter accounts like domino, steven roberts, josh drew, neil de grasse tyson, and hans rosling\n that convinced me that there are important things going on on twitter\n that social media has great value and power\n and that it’s not just all about donuts\n so this is how i use social media now\n my research is on coho salmon migration in puget sound\n click 1\n so my posts tend to have a fishy theme\n\n click 2\n on twitter i might share a link to an article i’m reading about salmon migration\n\n click 3\n on facebook, i like this interactive map showing tagged animals\n\n click 4\n on foursquare, this is where i do my field research\n\n click 5\n on instagram, here’s a picture of a coho i tagged\n\n click 6\n on youtube, here i am explaining my research\n\n click 7\n and on linkedin, my skills include tracking salmon\n
  • it’s twitter accounts like domino, steven roberts, josh drew, neil de grasse tyson, and hans rosling\n that convinced me that there are important things going on on twitter\n that social media has great value and power\n and that it’s not just all about donuts\n so this is how i use social media now\n my research is on coho salmon migration in puget sound\n click 1\n so my posts tend to have a fishy theme\n\n click 2\n on twitter i might share a link to an article i’m reading about salmon migration\n\n click 3\n on facebook, i like this interactive map showing tagged animals\n\n click 4\n on foursquare, this is where i do my field research\n\n click 5\n on instagram, here’s a picture of a coho i tagged\n\n click 6\n on youtube, here i am explaining my research\n\n click 7\n and on linkedin, my skills include tracking salmon\n
  • it’s twitter accounts like domino, steven roberts, josh drew, neil de grasse tyson, and hans rosling\n that convinced me that there are important things going on on twitter\n that social media has great value and power\n and that it’s not just all about donuts\n so this is how i use social media now\n my research is on coho salmon migration in puget sound\n click 1\n so my posts tend to have a fishy theme\n\n click 2\n on twitter i might share a link to an article i’m reading about salmon migration\n\n click 3\n on facebook, i like this interactive map showing tagged animals\n\n click 4\n on foursquare, this is where i do my field research\n\n click 5\n on instagram, here’s a picture of a coho i tagged\n\n click 6\n on youtube, here i am explaining my research\n\n click 7\n and on linkedin, my skills include tracking salmon\n
  • it’s twitter accounts like domino, steven roberts, josh drew, neil de grasse tyson, and hans rosling\n that convinced me that there are important things going on on twitter\n that social media has great value and power\n and that it’s not just all about donuts\n so this is how i use social media now\n my research is on coho salmon migration in puget sound\n click 1\n so my posts tend to have a fishy theme\n\n click 2\n on twitter i might share a link to an article i’m reading about salmon migration\n\n click 3\n on facebook, i like this interactive map showing tagged animals\n\n click 4\n on foursquare, this is where i do my field research\n\n click 5\n on instagram, here’s a picture of a coho i tagged\n\n click 6\n on youtube, here i am explaining my research\n\n click 7\n and on linkedin, my skills include tracking salmon\n
  • it’s twitter accounts like domino, steven roberts, josh drew, neil de grasse tyson, and hans rosling\n that convinced me that there are important things going on on twitter\n that social media has great value and power\n and that it’s not just all about donuts\n so this is how i use social media now\n my research is on coho salmon migration in puget sound\n click 1\n so my posts tend to have a fishy theme\n\n click 2\n on twitter i might share a link to an article i’m reading about salmon migration\n\n click 3\n on facebook, i like this interactive map showing tagged animals\n\n click 4\n on foursquare, this is where i do my field research\n\n click 5\n on instagram, here’s a picture of a coho i tagged\n\n click 6\n on youtube, here i am explaining my research\n\n click 7\n and on linkedin, my skills include tracking salmon\n
  • it’s twitter accounts like domino, steven roberts, josh drew, neil de grasse tyson, and hans rosling\n that convinced me that there are important things going on on twitter\n that social media has great value and power\n and that it’s not just all about donuts\n so this is how i use social media now\n my research is on coho salmon migration in puget sound\n click 1\n so my posts tend to have a fishy theme\n\n click 2\n on twitter i might share a link to an article i’m reading about salmon migration\n\n click 3\n on facebook, i like this interactive map showing tagged animals\n\n click 4\n on foursquare, this is where i do my field research\n\n click 5\n on instagram, here’s a picture of a coho i tagged\n\n click 6\n on youtube, here i am explaining my research\n\n click 7\n and on linkedin, my skills include tracking salmon\n
  • it’s twitter accounts like domino, steven roberts, josh drew, neil de grasse tyson, and hans rosling\n that convinced me that there are important things going on on twitter\n that social media has great value and power\n and that it’s not just all about donuts\n so this is how i use social media now\n my research is on coho salmon migration in puget sound\n click 1\n so my posts tend to have a fishy theme\n\n click 2\n on twitter i might share a link to an article i’m reading about salmon migration\n\n click 3\n on facebook, i like this interactive map showing tagged animals\n\n click 4\n on foursquare, this is where i do my field research\n\n click 5\n on instagram, here’s a picture of a coho i tagged\n\n click 6\n on youtube, here i am explaining my research\n\n click 7\n and on linkedin, my skills include tracking salmon\n
  • it’s twitter accounts like domino, steven roberts, josh drew, neil de grasse tyson, and hans rosling\n that convinced me that there are important things going on on twitter\n that social media has great value and power\n and that it’s not just all about donuts\n so this is how i use social media now\n my research is on coho salmon migration in puget sound\n click 1\n so my posts tend to have a fishy theme\n\n click 2\n on twitter i might share a link to an article i’m reading about salmon migration\n\n click 3\n on facebook, i like this interactive map showing tagged animals\n\n click 4\n on foursquare, this is where i do my field research\n\n click 5\n on instagram, here’s a picture of a coho i tagged\n\n click 6\n on youtube, here i am explaining my research\n\n click 7\n and on linkedin, my skills include tracking salmon\n
  • it’s twitter accounts like domino, steven roberts, josh drew, neil de grasse tyson, and hans rosling\n that convinced me that there are important things going on on twitter\n that social media has great value and power\n and that it’s not just all about donuts\n so this is how i use social media now\n my research is on coho salmon migration in puget sound\n click 1\n so my posts tend to have a fishy theme\n\n click 2\n on twitter i might share a link to an article i’m reading about salmon migration\n\n click 3\n on facebook, i like this interactive map showing tagged animals\n\n click 4\n on foursquare, this is where i do my field research\n\n click 5\n on instagram, here’s a picture of a coho i tagged\n\n click 6\n on youtube, here i am explaining my research\n\n click 7\n and on linkedin, my skills include tracking salmon\n
  • it’s twitter accounts like domino, steven roberts, josh drew, neil de grasse tyson, and hans rosling\n that convinced me that there are important things going on on twitter\n that social media has great value and power\n and that it’s not just all about donuts\n so this is how i use social media now\n my research is on coho salmon migration in puget sound\n click 1\n so my posts tend to have a fishy theme\n\n click 2\n on twitter i might share a link to an article i’m reading about salmon migration\n\n click 3\n on facebook, i like this interactive map showing tagged animals\n\n click 4\n on foursquare, this is where i do my field research\n\n click 5\n on instagram, here’s a picture of a coho i tagged\n\n click 6\n on youtube, here i am explaining my research\n\n click 7\n and on linkedin, my skills include tracking salmon\n
  • it’s twitter accounts like domino, steven roberts, josh drew, neil de grasse tyson, and hans rosling\n that convinced me that there are important things going on on twitter\n that social media has great value and power\n and that it’s not just all about donuts\n so this is how i use social media now\n my research is on coho salmon migration in puget sound\n click 1\n so my posts tend to have a fishy theme\n\n click 2\n on twitter i might share a link to an article i’m reading about salmon migration\n\n click 3\n on facebook, i like this interactive map showing tagged animals\n\n click 4\n on foursquare, this is where i do my field research\n\n click 5\n on instagram, here’s a picture of a coho i tagged\n\n click 6\n on youtube, here i am explaining my research\n\n click 7\n and on linkedin, my skills include tracking salmon\n
  • it’s twitter accounts like domino, steven roberts, josh drew, neil de grasse tyson, and hans rosling\n that convinced me that there are important things going on on twitter\n that social media has great value and power\n and that it’s not just all about donuts\n so this is how i use social media now\n my research is on coho salmon migration in puget sound\n click 1\n so my posts tend to have a fishy theme\n\n click 2\n on twitter i might share a link to an article i’m reading about salmon migration\n\n click 3\n on facebook, i like this interactive map showing tagged animals\n\n click 4\n on foursquare, this is where i do my field research\n\n click 5\n on instagram, here’s a picture of a coho i tagged\n\n click 6\n on youtube, here i am explaining my research\n\n click 7\n and on linkedin, my skills include tracking salmon\n
  • \n
  • another great thing about social media is you can actually get all kinds of data from most services \n and analyze your effectiveness\n there are several analytics applications, \n and here I’m showing a free report from tweetreach.com\n this report is on my personal activity, \n but you could also check out the activity of a hashtag or an individual tweet\n over a 9 day period i had close to 50 thousand impressions\n keep in mind, impressions don’t mean users, \n because some people saw more than one of my tweets\n
  • there’s lots of different information you can get from these reports,\n you can see your activity over time\n and find which other accounts are interacting with you \n which are helping you get more impressions\n here you can see that i was retweeted by oceana, \n which bumped up my impressions quite a bit\n
  • so this is a map of where my twitter followers are located around the world\n I created it in R, \n and there will be a link to the package in the wiki\n I’ve been on twitter for about 1 year\n and my network before twitter was a handful of people in the northwest and a few international contacts\n now I am connected with hundreds of people,\n intelligent and witty people from multiple disciplines, \n who funnel to me their best finds and smartest comments\n every day, at all hours, all for no cost. \n Where else in the world can you dip in and out of a cocktail party filled only with guests of your choosing at any time you choose?\n\n
  • \n
  • as a final note, i want to take the communication and networking aspect of social media a step further\n has anybody in the room heard of crowdfunding?\n it’s an extension of the fundraising model that charities use\n to gather small donations from lots of people\n but crowdfunding uses a social media twist\n I like the think of crowdfunding science as getting paid to do outreach and communicate your science online\n\n click 1\n there are several websites where scientists can set up their own campaigns for research funding \n and social media is integral in spreading the word about your project\n and in winning support from funders\n\n click 2\n here is a student at UW who is currently doing a petridish campaign\n she says that twitter and crowdfunding go together like a spoon and peanut butter\n\n
  • as a final note, i want to take the communication and networking aspect of social media a step further\n has anybody in the room heard of crowdfunding?\n it’s an extension of the fundraising model that charities use\n to gather small donations from lots of people\n but crowdfunding uses a social media twist\n I like the think of crowdfunding science as getting paid to do outreach and communicate your science online\n\n click 1\n there are several websites where scientists can set up their own campaigns for research funding \n and social media is integral in spreading the word about your project\n and in winning support from funders\n\n click 2\n here is a student at UW who is currently doing a petridish campaign\n she says that twitter and crowdfunding go together like a spoon and peanut butter\n\n
  • \n
  • this is lauren’s page scifund page\n she writes blog posts and promotes her project through social media\n she still has a few weeks left to fully fund the project but is already close to her goal\n and her campaign is largely successful because of the interactions she has had with potential funders through social media\n
  • so I hope I have convinced you that social media can help you\nbuild your network of scientists\nearn research funding\nand increase the public understanding of science\nand that you might put aside whatever you previously thought about social media\nand give it an honest try\ni think you will be pleasantly surprised\n
  • \n
  • \n

Beyond a Trend: How Scientists Use Social Media Beyond a Trend: How Scientists Use Social Media Presentation Transcript

  • Beyond a Trend:How Scientists Use Social Media Jessica Rohde M.S. Student, University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences President, American Fisheries Society University of Washington Student Chapter Social Media Chair, WA-BC Chapter of the American Fisheries Society
  • I started college in 2004, the year facebook became available on college campuses. I took to it quickly. My college days (studying abroad in Mongolia)
  • Juvenile Lemon Shark Turks & Caicos Islands photo: K. RihiimakiI mostly used it to share photos of field research. View slide
  • By the time I graduated, I thought all social media was about sharing trivial things about yourself... here graphic: whattheklout.virb.com View slide
  • By the time I graduated, I thought all social media was about sharing trivial things about yourself... ...like donuts here graphic: whattheklout.virb.com
  • here graphic: whattheklout.virb.com
  • here graphic: whattheklout.virb.com
  • here graphic: whattheklout.virb.com
  • here graphic: whattheklout.virb.com
  • here graphic: whattheklout.virb.com
  • here graphic: whattheklout.virb.com
  • In graduate school, I was surprised to discoverhow little most people understand about science.
  • “To the best of your knowledge, what proportion of climate scientists think that global warming is happening?”Leiserowitz, A., Maibach, E., Roser-Renouf, C., & Smith, N. (2011) Climate change in the American Mind: Americans’ globalwarming beliefs and attitudes in May 2011. Yale University and George Mason University. New Haven, CT: Yale Project onClimate Change Communication. http://environment.yale.edu/climate/files/ClimateBeliefsMay2011.pdf
  • “To the best of your knowledge, what proportion of climate scientists think that global warming is happening?” 40% 30% 31 % ofthose 20% 23polled 19 12 13 10% 3 0 Don’t know 0-20% 21-40% 41-60% 61-80% 81-100% Choices (% of scientists who think global warming is happening)Leiserowitz, A., Maibach, E., Roser-Renouf, C., & Smith, N. (2011) Climate change in the American Mind: Americans’ globalwarming beliefs and attitudes in May 2011. Yale University and George Mason University. New Haven, CT: Yale Project onClimate Change Communication. http://environment.yale.edu/climate/files/ClimateBeliefsMay2011.pdf
  • Then I met Liz,a science communication professional... Liz Neeley Assistant Director of Science Outreach @Liz Neeley
  • Me: Liz, how can I be a betterscience communicator?
  • Me: Liz, how can I be a betterscience communicator?Liz: Are you on twitter?
  • Me: Liz, how can I be a betterscience communicator?Liz: Are you on twitter?Me: No....
  • Me: Liz, how can I be a betterscience communicator?Liz: Are you on twitter?Me: No....Liz: Why not?
  • Me: Liz, how can I be a betterscience communicator?Liz: Are you on twitter?Me: No....Liz: Why not?I decided my personal biaswasn’t a good answer.
  • 600 500 400 Users 300 (millions) 200 100 02005 2006 2007 2009 2010 2011http://www.searchenginejournal.com/the-growth-of-social-media-an-infographic/32788/
  • 600 500Whether we like it or not, 400 social media is where Users the general public is. 300 (millions) 200 100 0 2005 2006 2007 2009 2010 2011 http://www.searchenginejournal.com/the-growth-of-social-media-an-infographic/32788/
  • vs.urbanliteraryreview.com
  • vs.• >60,000 character limit • 140 characters limit urbanliteraryreview.com
  • vs.• >60,000 character limit • 140 characters limit•“friends” •“followers” urbanliteraryreview.com
  • vs.• >60,000 character limit • 140 characters limit•“friends” •“followers”• people you know in real life • people you have never met urbanliteraryreview.com
  • vs.• >60,000 character limit • 140 characters limit•“friends” •“followers”• people you know in real life • people you have never met• extensive privacy settings • limited privacy settings urbanliteraryreview.com
  • vs.• >60,000 character limit • 140 characters limit•“friends” •“followers”• people you know in real life • people you have never met• extensive privacy settings • limited privacy settings• links, pictures, video, • links, pictures, video comments, events, pages, etc. urbanliteraryreview.com
  • vs.group of friends cocktail party urbanliteraryreview.com
  • vs. group of friends cocktail party We all go to a cocktail party with a purpose:“that’s the real place to hear the interesting stuff for our careers.” urbanliteraryreview.com James Darcey http://physicsworld.com/blog/2010/02/researchers_join_the_twitterat.html
  • How is twitter useful to scientists?
  • How is twitter useful to scientists?LEARN•eavesdropping•crowd-source•collect data
  • How is twitter useful to scientists?LEARN TEACH•eavesdropping • share resources•crowd-source • tell stories•collect data • discuss & debate
  • How is twitter useful to scientists?LEARN TEACH NETWORK•eavesdropping • share resources • meet new people•crowd-source • tell stories • build relationships•collect data • discuss & debate • develop community
  • How is twitter useful to scientists?NETWORK LEARN TEACH• meet new people •eavesdropping • share resources• build relationships •crowd-source • tell stories• develop community •collect data • discuss & debate
  • How is twitter useful to scientists?NETWORK LEARN TEACH• meet new people •eavesdropping • share resources• build relationships •crowd-source • tell stories• develop community •collect data • discuss & debate You can’t effectively learn or teach without first building connections.
  • traditional media social media
  • traditional media social media
  • traditional media social media
  • traditional media social media
  • traditional media social media conversation is key
  • My “handle”@RockyRohde “hashtag” #Rest12
  • I met some interesting scientists on twitter. What do they tweet about? (hint: not donuts)
  • Neil deGrasse TysonAstrophysicist, American Museum of Natural HistoryAuthor: Space Chronicle, The Pluto Files @neiltysonHost: StarTalk Radio
  • Neil deGrasse TysonAstrophysicist, American Museum of Natural HistoryAuthor: Space Chronicle, The Pluto Files @neiltysonHost: StarTalk Radio“I’m just trying to create a place where the twitterverse meets the universe.”
  • But you don’t have to be famous to benefit from social media...
  • Joshua DrewPost-doc at the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago @labroidesAdjunct Professor, Biology Department of East West University
  • Joshua DrewPost-doc at the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago @labroidesAdjunct Professor, Biology Department of East West University“On a personal level my engagement in social media has made me feel pluggedinto a much larger community, and it has been wonderful to communicate,collaborate and explore new ideas with a larger scientific community.”
  • Professors can share twitter responsibilitiesamong lab members, or use it in the classroom.
  • Steven: @sr320Steven Roberts Roberts lab: @genefishAssistant ProfessorUniversity of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
  • Steven: @sr320Steven Roberts Roberts lab: @genefishAssistant ProfessorUniversity of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences“We try to increase outreach efficiency by sharing what we are already doingin our teaching and research.”
  • Octopus larvae video on YouTube
  • Get creative! Maybe you aren’t the focus... your study species or system is.
  • Where’s Domino?Whale shark Rhincodon typus @wheres_domino
  • Where’s Domino?Whale shark Rhincodon typus @wheres_dominoBehind the tweets: @para_sightAlistair DoveDirector of Research/Conservation at Georgia AquariumBlogger at DeepSeaNews.com
  • Those examples are all very active on twitter,but you can gain much from twitter with little effort.
  • Continuum of social media styleslistening, participating + creating casual sharing content
  • Continuum of social media styles listening, participating + creating casual sharing contentHans RoslingProfessor of Global Health, Karolinska InstitutetCo-founder of Gapminder Foundation
  • Continuum of social media styles listening, participating + creating casual sharing contentHans RoslingProfessor of Global Health, Karolinska InstitutetCo-founder of Gapminder Foundation
  • Continuum of social media styles listening, participating + creating casual sharing contentHans RoslingProfessor of Global Health, Karolinska InstitutetCo-founder of Gapminder Foundation “1 tweet per day” @HansRosling
  • Now I use social media to share my research.I study salmon migration, so my posts are a little fishy. here here graphic: whattheklout.virb.com
  • herehere graphic: whattheklout.virb.com
  • reading this article about salmon migration (link)herehere graphic: whattheklout.virb.com
  • reading this article about salmon migration (link) this interactive map that shows where tagged animals are (link)herehere graphic: whattheklout.virb.com
  • reading this article about salmon migration (link) this interactive map that shows where tagged animals are (link) do my field researchherehere graphic: whattheklout.virb.com
  • reading this article about salmon migration (link) this interactive map that shows where tagged animals are (link) do my field research a coho salmon I taggedherehere graphic: whattheklout.virb.com
  • reading this article about salmon migration (link) this interactive map that shows where tagged animals are (link) do my field research a coho salmon I taggedherehere explaining my research on coho migration graphic: whattheklout.virb.com
  • reading this article about salmon migration (link) this interactive map that shows where tagged animals are (link) do my field research a coho salmon I taggedherehere explaining my research on coho migration tracking salmon via ultrasonic telemetry graphic: whattheklout.virb.com
  • You can access the data on your activity for most social media sites.
  • tweetreach.com
  • Distribution of @RockyRohde followers @RockyRohde Follower MapAsia 9Africa 2N. America 214S. America 6Australia/N.Z. 9Europe 29 R package “twitteR” by J. Gentry R functions Copyright (C) 2011 J. Leek Simply Statistics Blog http://simplystatistics.tumblr.com
  • Think a step further...can social media help you fund your research?
  • Crowdfunding ScienceAn extension of the fundraising model that charities use to gather small donations fromlots of people, but using a social media twist.
  • Crowdfunding ScienceAn extension of the fundraising model that charities use to gather small donations fromlots of people, but using a social media twist.
  • Crowdfunding ScienceAn extension of the fundraising model that charities use to gather small donations fromlots of people, but using a social media twist.
  • Lauren’s SciFund video on YouTube
  • Crowdfunding science: #SciFund, petridish.org
  • Take HomeSocial media (twitter especially) can help... • increase the public understanding of science • build your network of scientists • earn research funding
  • Thanks to all who have supported my tweeting. U of WA WA-BC AFS Inspirational Jennifer Davison Mark Celedonia Tweeps Julia Parrish Mark Pedersen Liz Neeley Lisa Graumlich John Morgan Christie Wilcox Steven Roberts Brian Missildine Bora Zivkovic Iris Kemp Emily Pizzichemi Joshua Drew Jessica Hale Lisa Harlan Alistair Dove Tom Quinn Orlay Johnson J. Osborne-Gowey Morgan Bond Christopher Clark Carly Strasser Rachel Hovel Alexis Rudd Peter Westley Craig McClain Jon Whittouck Miriam Goldstein Curry Cunningham Kevin Zelnio Neala Kendall Neil deGrasse Tyson Hans Rosling
  • All resources mentioned can be found on our wiki http://restoration2012.wikispaces.com/