The After Affects Of War

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A discussion on pre and post war social systems and the impact on military troops returning from war

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  • 1. The After Affects of War Social Systems Affecting Military Members Returning From Combat Rogers William Gardner II 1 07/07/09
  • 2. Sun Tzu on the Art of War It is only one who is thoroughly acquainted with the evils of war that can thoroughly understand the profitable way of carrying it on. 2 07/07/09
  • 3. Agenda  Expectations of the Military Human Service Worker  Training, Education and Background of the Military the Human Service workers  Pre-War Social Systems  Peace Time Services offered by the Military  Social Systems During War  War Time Services Offered by the Military 3 07/07/09
  • 4. Agenda Continued  Post-War Social Systems  Post-War Services offered by the Military  Summary/Conclusion.  Recommendations  Resources 4 07/07/09
  • 5. Social Systems Affecting Military Members Returning From Combat 5 07/07/09
  • 6. Social Systems Affecting Military Members Returning From Combat The United States is at War and military members are being asked to put their life on the line on a daily basis. War and the way of life it brings (Socials Systems) has a huge impact on our troops. 6 07/07/09
  • 7. Social Systems Affecting Military Members Returning From Combat Understanding the impact different pre and post war social systems have on military troops returning from war is an important element in providing human services to the United States military population. 7 07/07/09
  • 8. Social Systems Affecting Military Members Returning From Combat This Project will discuss various Social Systems and the impact the social systems play in providing human services to the military. Research presented will discuss pre and post war social systems and illustrate how they and the perceptions of human service worker and the client impact the services available to each and ultimately the client recovery process. 8 07/07/09
  • 9. Expectations of the Military Human Service Worker According to Air Force Pamphlet 36- 2241V1, The United States Air Force provides service programs that promote a sense of community among patrons and provide support services commonly furnished by other employers or other state and local governments to their employees and citizens. 9 07/07/09
  • 10. Expectations of the Military Human Service Worker The Family Support Center (FSC) serves as the primary prevention agency and functions to ensure necessary resources to support families are available and accessible. 10 07/07/09
  • 11. Expectations of the Military Human Service Worker This agency contains a large percentage of the programs that are critical to the physical, cultural/social needs and the general well being of the military members. (Air Force Pamphlet 36-2241, 2003) 11 07/07/09
  • 12. Training, Education and Background of the Military the Human Service Workers According to the Airman Magazine(2004) The highest level of education attained by the enlisted force is 15 percent Associates Degree of higher, and 5 percent B.A./B.S. or higher. The Highest level of education attained by the officer force is 49 percent B.A. /B.S. or higher and 51 percent advanced or professional degree or higher. 12 07/07/09
  • 13. Training, Education and Background of the Military the Human Service Workers The Highest level of education attained by the officer force is 49 percent B.A. /B.S. or higher and 51 percent advanced or professional degree or higher. 13 07/07/09
  • 14. Military Equal Opportunity For entry into the MEO specialty, members need to have completed high school with courses in social science, psychology, sociology, human resources and behavior, organizational development.(Department of the Air Force, 2004) 14 07/07/09
  • 15. Mental Health For entry into the Mental Health Education specialty members need to have completed high school. Completion of college courses in psychology, social or behavioral science such as psychology, counseling, substance abuse treatment, sociology, and marriage and family is also desirable. (Department of the Air Force, 2004) 15 07/07/09
  • 16. Chaplains For entry into the Chaplain Education specialty members need to have knowledge of Air Force war plans, objectives, principles, and methods; Chaplain Service organizational management principles and practices; policies; procedures; programs; activities; and readiness requirements. Advancement in the Chaplain Career field requires the completion of the Air Force Chaplain Orientation Course. (Department of the Air Force, 2004) 16 07/07/09
  • 17. Pre-War Social Systems 17 07/07/09
  • 18. Family Pre-War Social Systems Quality of life issues affecting Guard and Reserve families during deployments and separations can impact military morale, mission accomplishment, and retention. Research has shown that there is a strong correlation between family satisfaction with military service and the reenlistment and retention of service members. (GUARD & RESERVE FAMILY READINESS PROGRAMS TOOLKIT, http://www.classbrain.com/artfree/uploads/c.pdf) 18 07/07/09
  • 19. Family Pre-War Social Systems Your happiness and support of your spouse’s military career significantly affects his or her military duty. 19 07/07/09
  • 20. Deployments Pre-War Social Systems More recently, the 9/11 terrorist attacks created a host of new demands on the Air Force, many of which now appear permanent. 20 07/07/09
  • 21. The most glaring example is the requirement for heightened force protection in the US and overseas. The global war on terror also highlighted shortages in the AEF (Air Expeditionary Forces) system. 21 07/07/09
  • 22. Money Pre-War Social Systems Another change is the makeup of the people who are in the military today. The armed services are no longer mostly made up of single men and women who can easily pick up and move from one duty station to another. (Money and Mobility, http://www.nmfa.org/nefe/intro/intro2.html#2) 22 07/07/09
  • 23. Money Pre-War Social Systems Instead, service members are just as likely to be family people. Some service members are single parents. Others may be married, and many have children. Now, that constant of military life—the permanent change of station—is likely to be a family affair. 23 07/07/09
  • 24. Money Pre-War Social Systems Of course, a life of moves also can be stressful. “Pulling up roots” isn’t easy and it can be expensive. Often, the difference between the painful move and the adventuresome move depends on your family’s level of preparedness—especially financial preparedness. 24 07/07/09
  • 25. Peace Time Services Offered by the Military Human Services Workers Just like civilians, some military personnel need assistance with various problems or concerns, including career decisions, family issues, substance abuse, or emotional problems. 25 07/07/09
  • 26. Peace Time Services Offered by the Military Human Services Workers Caseworkers and counselors work with military personnel and their families to help them with their particular concerns. (http://www.iseek.org/sv/12120.jsp?id=1) 26 07/07/09
  • 27. Peace Time Services Offered by the Military Human Services Workers They may specialize by the type of counseling that they do, such as career guidance or alcohol and drug abuse prevention. (http://www.iseek.org/sv/12120.jsp?id=1) 27 07/07/09
  • 28. Peace Time Services Offered by the Military Human Services Workers They normally work as part of a team that may include social workers, psychologists, medical officers, chaplains, personnel specialists, and commanders. 28 07/07/09
  • 29. Peace Time Services Offered by the Military Human Services Workers The services have about 1,000 caseworkers and counselors. Each year, they need new caseworkers and counselors due to changes in personnel and the demands of the field. After job training, they work under close supervision. With experience, they work more independently and may supervise other caseworkers.(http://www.iseek.org/sv/12120.jsp?id=1) 29 07/07/09
  • 30. Peace Time Services Offered by the Military Human Services Workers Caseworkers and counselors in the military perform some or all of the following duties:  Interview personnel who request help or are referred by their commanders  Identify problems and determine the need for professional help (http://www.iseek.org/sv/12120.jsp?id=1) 30 07/07/09
  • 31. Peace Time Services Offered by the Military Human Services Workers  Counsel personnel and their families  Administer and score psychological tests  Help personnel evaluate and explore career opportunities  Teach classes on human relations  Keep records of counseling sessions 31 07/07/09
  • 32. The Air Force has several career fields charged with providing human services to the military population. Chaplains, Military Equal Opportunity, and Mental Health Officers are just a few of the agencies who provide commanders with recommendations concerning the cultural climate of the unit. 32 07/07/09
  • 33. Peace Time Services Offered by the Military Human Services Workers Chaplains: Conducts worship services, liturgies, and rites. Provides counseling, pastoral care, visitation, religious education, morale programs, spiritual renewal, lay leadership programs, and humanitarian outreach opportunities. 33 07/07/09
  • 34. Air Force Chaplains Chaplains also represents the faith and military communities in religious, patriotic, and civic events. Maintain liaison with civilian clergy and organizations to keep current in areas of interest to Chaplain Service programs. For entry into this specialty, ecclesiastical endorsement from a faith group recognized by the DoD Armed Forces Chaplains Board is mandatory. (www.dcandr.ang.af.mil/recruiting/afsc/5xx.htm) 34 07/07/09
  • 35. Social Systems During War 35 07/07/09
  • 36. Death For young soldiers seeking a better life, the onset of war changes all of that. Suddenly, it’s no longer about the college fund. It’s about facing the very real possibility of death and the death of your friends fighting beside you in Iraq.(Soldiers with second thoughts, www.affbrainwash.com/archives/013673.php) 36 07/07/09
  • 37. Death It means facing political uncertainty back home, where your friends and relatives likely remain divided and angered over why you’re over there in the first place. (Soldiers with second thoughts, www.affbrainwash.com/archives/013673.php) 37 07/07/09
  • 38. War Time Services offered by the Military The Air Force has several career fields charged with providing human services to the military population. Chaplains, Military Equal Opportunity, and Mental Health Officers are just a few of the agencies who provide commanders with recommendations concerning the cultural climate of the unit. Veteran and Military Chaplain and Family Services , www.members.aol.com/veterans/warlib 38 07/07/09
  • 39. Post War Social Systems 39 07/07/09
  • 40. Social Systems Affecting Military Members Returning From Combat “Ghosts of War” http://www.thememoryhole.org/war/gulfwar2 / 40 07/07/09
  • 41. “Ghosts of War” “Social Systems Affecting Military Members Returning From Combat What does the term “Ghost of War” mean? Combat-related psychological problems sometimes called the "ghosts of war“, can haunt survivors, affecting everything they do. 41 07/07/09
  • 42. “Ghosts of War” “Social Systems Affecting Military Members Returning From Combat In anticipation, Veterans Administration hospitals and clinics are preparing to treat returning troops, while families and co-workers wonder what changes they might find in soldiers when they come home. This is a story that continues to unfold, especially since Army policy is preventing many military members from leaving the service at their scheduled times. 42 07/07/09
  • 43. “Ghosts of War” “Social Systems Affecting Military Members Returning From Combat Why it Matters The ability of a soldier - and society - to adjust to loss and trauma can involve the search for meaning in the sacrifice. That philosophical, theological and ethical search for meaning is the terrain of religion. 43 07/07/09
  • 44. Trauma Post War Social Systems A catastrophic event may so shatter a person's psychic equilibrium that he cannot represent the event to himself—cannot assimilate the event into any stories of the world or self he knows. Instead, the event actually disintegrates the stories that connect the self to the world. Without such stories, a person truly is bereft and broken. ( War of Ghost: Trauma Theories, Traumatic Histories, and the Middle East http://www.tikkun.org/magazine/index.cfm/ action/tikkun/issue/tik0301/article/030154.html) 44 07/07/09
  • 45. Trauma Post War Social Systems No science fiction or dystopic scenarios, for example, could prepare us for the realities of Hiroshima or the Nazi concentration camps; not even pictures of the Twin Towers in flames could prepare us for their fall. The events of atomic war, modern genocide and mass-scale terrorism shattered our previous narratives of political stability and technological progress. ( War of Ghost: Trauma Theories, Traumatic Histories, and the Middle East http://www.tikkun.org/magazine/index.cfm/action/tikkun/issue/tik0301/article/030154.html) 45 07/07/09
  • 46. They rendered negligible what we had thought were our most terrible fantasies. 46 07/07/09
  • 47. Post Traumatic Stress Most members of the military services returning from combat duty in Iraq and Afghanistan have experienced traumatic events such as being shot at, killing someone, and knowing someone who was injured or killed. Psychiatric Cost of War for US Military: Depression symptoms, causes, and treatments including clinical and manic 47 www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=33765 07/07/09
  • 48. Post Traumatic Stress Almost 20% of respondents to a survey of soldiers and Marines returning from Iraq or Afghanistan suffered from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but most had not sought or received treatment. The perceived barriers to treatment included concern about the stigma associated with mental illness and about possible harm to a career. Psychiatric Cost of War for US Military, http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=33765 48 07/07/09
  • 49. Post War Services offered by the Military The Air Force has several career fields charged with providing human services to the military population. Chaplains, Military Equal Opportunity, and Mental Health Officers are just a few of the agencies who provide commanders with recommendations concerning the cultural climate of the unit. Veteran and Military Chaplain and Family Services , www.members.aol.com/veterans/warlib 49 07/07/09
  • 50. Summary An understanding of Social Systems affecting military members is the key to providing a foundation for programs that will provide leaders and human service workers a way to identify sensitivity situations and force the Air Force to be more responsive to the needs of its members. 50 07/07/09
  • 51. Recommendations With that said, this learner would recommend a new train of thought on military human service workers and their ability to assess external factors affecting members returning from war. 51 07/07/09
  • 52. There are many different world events affecting todays’ military. Identifying socials systems negatively affecting members will play a more significant role in helping military members re-adjust to his/her home life when returning from war. 52 07/07/09
  • 53. Home Sweet Home! 53 07/07/09
  • 54. Where to Get More Information Air Force Officer Job Descriptions & Qualifications, (2004) retrieved 12 June 2004 at http://usmilitary.about.com/library/milinfo/afoffjobs Air Force Pamphlet 36-2241, Promotion and Fitness Examination (2003) Department of The Air Force, pg 205 Air Force Manual 36-2105, Officer Classification, (2004) Department of the Air Force Air Force Manual 36-2108, Enlisted Classification, (2004) Department of the Air Force 54 07/07/09
  • 55. Where to Get More Information Airman Magazine (2004), Air Force News Agency, Secretary of the Air Force, Office of public Affairs, pg 36 A War of Ghosts: Trauma Theories, Traumatic Histories, and the Middle East www.tikkun.org/magazine/index.cfm/action/tikkun/issue/tik0301/article/03015 Psychiatric Cost of War for US Military: Depression symptoms, causes, and treatments including clinical and manic www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=33765 55 07/07/09