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Systematic instructional design
Systematic instructional design
Systematic instructional design
Systematic instructional design
Systematic instructional design
Systematic instructional design
Systematic instructional design
Systematic instructional design
Systematic instructional design
Systematic instructional design
Systematic instructional design
Systematic instructional design
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Systematic instructional design

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  • In every building project, there must first be a blueprint created that details the dimensions of the end product as it is visualized. Careful planning comes into play in order to ensure the safety and durability of the finished building. Education and learning are constructed in the same manner. Learning can only be accomplished after a plan has been devised and implemented to guide learners and help them reach their learning potential.
  • Instructional design is considered to by many to be essentially the framework for learning (Siemens, 2002). This basic definition encompasses the ideology of all of the varying definitions given for the concept of instructional design.
  • Just as there are varying definitions for instructional design, there are also various models and methodologies. The most frequently used model in regards to academics is the ADDIE model. This model entails taking the steps of analyzation, design, development, implementation, and evaluation (Siemens, 2002).
  • Time has been said to be a precious commodity. People everywhere complain about there not being enough hours in the day to accomplish their goals. Using design models can assist with time management by giving individuals a format to follow and focus on (Thompson, 2001).
  • No one person can think of all the needed parts to create the perfect learning tool. It takes the involvement of numerous people gathering information and implementing a plan that satisfies the needs of the learner (Smith and Ragan, n.d.).
  • The product produced through the design process can be duplicated and distributed. It can be disbursed in various media forms to ensure the availability to the learners. Everything comes together with uniformity that causes less confusion and addresses some common issues with learning (Smith et al, n.d.).
  • One of the most tried and true methods of relaying information is by visual presentation. Some students learn faster when presented with visual aides to assist with transference of information.
  • On occasion, audio files saved to a CD can be used to accompany reading lessons in the printed text. This allows the learner to gain understanding faster by helping them get past words that they may not know or understand.
  • The World Wide Web, or internet as it is affectionately known as, give the learner another platform for asynchronous learning. There are numerous existing websites that assist teachers with lesson plans and activities, and there are many more being produced right now.
  • Last, but definitely not least, there is the printed text. With all of the digital media such as tablets and smartphones that can be used to download reading material, books are almost an afterthought. These tablets allow for all of the required textbooks to be loaded for reading and activities without straining a muscle carrying such a heavy load.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Rogers L. Smith Jr.American Intercontinental University
    • 2.  ADDIE Algo-Heuristic Dick and Carey Model Robert Gagne’s Model Minimalism Kemp, Morrison, and Ross Model Rapid Prototyping Epathic Instructional Design
    • 3.  Encourages gathering information from the learner Supports instruction that is effective and efficient Supports coordination of designers, developers, and implementers
    • 4.  Physical products produced Alternate delivery systems Congruence between objectives, activities, and assessments Systematic framework for dealing with issues with learning
    • 5.  Smith, P. and Ragan, T. (n.d.). Instructional design second edition. Retrieved August 19, 2012 from http://peoplelearn.homestead.com/MEdHOME2/Brai nCognition/Instruc.Design.Smith.Ragan.pdf Siemens, G. (2002). Instructional design in elearning. Retrieved August 19, 2012 from http://www.elearnspace.org/Articles/InstructionalDes ign.htm Thompson, N. (2001). Why ID? The benefits of instructional design models. Retrieved August 19, 2012 from http://www.uwsa.edu/ttt/thompson.htm

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