The Role of Technology Clusters in the Successful Commercialization of MEMS
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This presentation addresses the necesasary facvtors to create a successful cluster to commercialize MEMS...the analysis is based on a Michael Porter model customized to address MEMS

This presentation addresses the necesasary facvtors to create a successful cluster to commercialize MEMS...the analysis is based on a Michael Porter model customized to address MEMS

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The Role of Technology Clusters in the Successful Commercialization of MEMS Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Technology Clusters and Their Role in the Development of the Micro and Nanosystems Industry 3 rd . Ibero American MEMS Conference Puebla, Mexico October 1-4, 2006 Roger H. Grace President, Roger Grace Associates Past President, Co-Founder, Micro and Nanotechnology Commercialization Education Foundation (MANCEF)
  • 2. Outline
    • Definition
    • Benefits
    • Requisite Constituents
    • Industry Situational Analysis
    • Technology Cluster Overview
    • Summary of Microsystems Clusters
    • Critical Success Factors
    • Summary/Conclusion
    • The Mexican MEMS Cluster…Recommendations
    • Case Studies
  • 3. Roger Grace Associates Background
    • Founded in 1982
    • Focus on semiconductors, sensors, microsystems,
    • semiconductor capital equipment
    • Expertise in strategic marketing
    • market research
    • product planning
    • company positioning
    • branding
  • 4. Definition
    • A cluster is:
    • a geographical concentration of firms, supplies and related industries and specialized institutions that occur in a particular field in a nation, state, city (or region).
    • (Ref: M. Porter, On Competition)
  • 5. Cluster Benefits
      • Enhance the competitive stature of the region and the organizations within
      • Help create an environment that will foster economic growth in the region
        • Create jobs vis-à-vis startups and increased business at existing organizations
        • Create an enhanced tax base
        • Retain existing employees
        • Attract qualified employees from other regions
  • 6. Requisite Constituents
    • For a successful technology cluster, all three of the following must exist:
      • Intellectual property
        • Universities and research labs patents
        • Individual know how of designs and processes
      • Infrastructure
        • Fab facilities (from R&D through production)
        • People (engineers, technicians, production, marketing/sales, finance, administration, consultants)
        • Suppliers (services and materials)
      • Financing
        • VCs
        • Angel Investors
        • Industrial Partners
        • State/local/federal government tax incentives and/or grants
  • 7. Industry Situational Analysis
      • Over 35 MNT clusters exist worldwide, all with a fab
      • Some have a technology focus e.g. Michigan-bio
      • Over 60 silicon foundries worldwide with more to come
      • Large volume production requirements are limited due to limited number of “killer applications”
      • Significant need for low-cost manufacture favors Asia
      • Packaging and testing (P&T) are major cost factors in MST
      • Limited expertise exists in P&T vs. wafer fabrication due to similarity/dissimilarity of MST vs. Semiconductor technology
      • P&T can be a product competitive advantage
      • Nanotechnology is the new tech “darling”…especially in public funding
  • 8. Technology Cluster Overview
      • Technology Clusters have been around since the late fifties in
        • Silicon Valley and Boston Route 128
      • Technology clusters were formed in these areas largely because
        • The IP of Stanford (Silicon Valley) and MIT (Boston Route 128)
      • Silicon Valley and Boston Route 128 companies had no “formal”
        • federal or state funding other than through military contracts
        • (Ref: A. Saxenian, Regional Advantage)
      • The first MEMS/Microsystems cluster was formed in 1989 in
        • Dortmund, Germany. Steag Micropacts and HK Planertechnik
        • were successful startups created by this
        • continued
  • 9. Technology Cluster Overview, continued
      • Although a number of US states have attempted to create MEMS/Microsystems/Nano clusters over the past five years, only a few have succeeded to date:
        • New York
        • Washington
        • Dortmund
      • Other states/countries are currently attempting to develop MEMS/Microsystems /Nano clusters but it is premature to judge their level of success
        • Florida
        • Georgia
        • Texas
        • Four Corners (New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona)
        • New Jersey
        • Michigan
        • California
        • Amazon Brazil
        • Mexico
  • 10. Summary of Microsystems Clusters (Partial List)
        • MINATEC - Grenoble, France
        • Dortmund - Germany
        • Bremen - Germany
        • Thuringia - Germany
        • Rheinland Palatinate - Germany
        • Aachen - GermanyJena - Germany
        • Leuven - Belgium
        • Neuchatel - Switzerland
        • Lausanne - Switzerland
        • Twente - Netherlands
        • Gothenberg – Sweden
        • Hsinchu, Taiwan
        • Amazon, Brazil
        • Mexico
        • Italy
        • Victoria, Australia
        • Korea
        • SUNY - Albany, New York
        • Washington State
        • 4 - corners
        • California - Nanotechnology
        • Florida
        • Texas
        • New Jersey
        • Michigan
        • Glennan – Ohio
        • Georgia
  • 11. Critical Success Factors
      • Sufficient regional/national government funding commitment over time
      • Product offering(s) must be unique and differentiated to create a market position
      • There must be a market need
      • Promotion is a critical item-must develop and integrated strategy/position/brand
        • Scotland-Silicon Glen (Semiconductors)
        • Albany-Nanotechnology,300mm/Conference
        • Michigan-bio/Ad program
        • IVAM-Dortmund/Integrated program
      • Need “flagship” organization to join cluster as “anchor”;Marks and Spencer , Saks …at the local mall analogy
      • Need attraction for people/organizations to commit vs. “build it and they shall come”
  • 12. Critical Success Factors,continued
      • Significant drawing factors include:
        • tax incentives
        • educated and skilled labor pool
        • quality of life of region
      • Educating the current/future work force is imperative
        • Michigan WIMS/NSF K-12 program
      • Current and near-term economic issues
        • Venture Capital
        • Corporations
        • Private Investors (angels)
  • 13. Summary/Conclusions
      • Clusters have had an important role in the creation of the microsystems industry since the first cluster in Dortmund, Germany in 1989
      • Clusters tend to emerge from R&D-centric regions, vis-à-vis, universities and/or research labs
      • Clusters provide many financial and market competitive advantages
      • Microsystems/Nanosystems clusters are proliferating - approximately 35 worldwide to date with Nanotechnology Clusters dominating recently
      • Over 100 companies and thousands of high skill jobs have been created thus far
  • 14. .
    • TRADITIONAL COMMERCIAL CLUSTERS
  • 15. Champagne France…Champagne
    • Resources: exceptional climate, chalky soil create great chardonnay and pinot noir grapes
    • Infrastructure: many processing facilities to create and store wine, wine making knowledge traditionally passed down; transportation system to deliver grapes to the wineries
    • Funding: self funded and large company buy outs
  • 16. Talavera Ornamental Pottery-Puebla, Mexico
    • Originated in mid 16 th. Century by Dominican priests who emigrated from Spain and brought the art
    • Resources: two types of clay nearby, large labor pool
    • Infrastructure: over 150 companies currently producing, 7 “certified”
    • Funding: R C Church “seed funds”
  • 17. “MEMS” Cluster in Puebla…1565 A.D.???
    • There is a shocking similarity to the processing of silicon wafers and the creation of Talevera pottery…could it be that a MEMS Cluster has been alive and well in Puebla since the mid 16 th . Century?
    • MEMS Talevera
    • Originated 1955 16 th . Century
    • Base material Sand (Silicon) Clay
    • Formation Hand/machine Chem./gas etching,
    • molding/spinning deposition
    • Patterning paper template photo masks
    • Surface high temp glazing annealing,oxidation
    • Stabilation
    • Standards limited number extensive
  • 18. Mexican MEMS Cluster Recommendations
    • Great progress has been made over the past three years:
    • in expanding MEMS teaching in Mexican Univ.
    • creation of a s moderate budget
    • creation of the Northern Mexico MEMS Packaging
    • Cluster
    • Need to take one step at a time and build up infrastructure
    • (labs) for device development in conjunction with establishing
    • packaging/interconnect/testing capabilities
    • MEMS-based module development
    • Ing. Humberto Rebolledo Diaz approach…build systems/buy parts to minmize time to profit
    • Investigate alternative cluster opportunites including “Micromanufacturing” e.g. precision injection molding, LIGA, nanoimprint lithography
    • Plan and execute major marketing outreach program to enhance awareness in the market for investors in Mexico MEMS…trade shows, PR, advertising
  • 19. Case Studies of Current MEMS/Microsystems /Nanotechnology Cluster Activities in U.S. and Europe
  • 20. IVAM/Dortmund, Germany
    • Founded
        • 1989
    • Number of Employees
        • 11 (IVAM) There are approximately 1200 people employed in the 13 participating companies in the Dortmund Microsystems Regional Cluster.
    • Technical Focus
        • Microsystem desices, software, packaging
    • Mission Plan
        • To commercialize microsystem-based products and services of its member organizations by building a bridge between suppliers and industry users using marketing and publics relations tactics
    • continued
  • 21. IVAM/Dortmund, Germany, continued
    • Number of Jobs Created
        • 1200
    • Funding
        • Funded by Ministry of Labor and Technology North Rhine, Wesphalia
    • Number of Companies Catalyzed
        • 13; most significant are:
          • Steag Microparts - medical devices (nebulator) and gas chromatograph
          • ETR - air quality sensing
          • H.L. Planartechnik - tilt sensors, humidity sensors, pressure sensors, accelerometers
    • continued
  • 22. IVAM/Dortmund, Germany, continued
    • Membership Fees/Dues
        • Annual turnover 50,000 Euros, fee 500 Euros
        • Annual turnover 100,000 Euros, fee 2,000 Euros
    • Wafer Capability
        • Raithg, Micropacts and H.L. Planartechnik have their own clean rooms, a common clean room is shared by all 13 participating companies
    • Website
        • www.ivamnrw.com
    • Additional Comments
        • The organization IVAM provides marketing and public relations services to the Dortmund Microsystem Cluster of 13 companies plus supports a number of other German regional clusters (Bremen, Thuringla, Rhineland Palatinate). There are 85 companies that are affiliated with IVAM and 30 members
        • Publishes “INNO” magazine on a quarterly basis with circulation of 6,000 in Germany, Switzerland, Netherlands, Austria (e-mail newsletter)
  • 23. University at Albany’s College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering
      • Total Space at CNSE’s Albany NanoTech complex
        • 470,000 square feet (current)
        • 720,000 square feet (2008)
      • Total Assets
        • More than $3 billion
      • Number of Global Corporate Partners
        • More than 250
      • Facilities/Capability
        • 71,000 square feet cleanroom class 100 or better (current)
        • 86,000 square feet cleanroom class 100 or better (2008)
      • Technical Focus
        • Opto, bio, fluidics - MEMS
        • Nanotechnology materials
        • Metrology semiconductor processing
        • Interconnects, stacked Ics
        • continued
  • 24. University at Albany’s College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering .. continued
      • Mission Plan
        • To create a global powerhouse for research, development, workforce education and economic outreach in nanotechnology and nanotechnology-enabled high-tech industries of the 21st century
        • On-site job growth
        • 2002- 108
        • 2003- 160
        • 2004- 500
        • 2005- 700
        • 2006- 1350
        • 2008 (projected)- 2000
        • Funding to date
          • State funding: $675M
          • Federal funding: $30 M
          • Industry funding: $2.5B
      • College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering
        • Founded in 2004 as world’s first college devoted to nanotechnology
        • 4 Constellations: Nanoscience, Nanoengineering, Nanoeconomics, Nanobioscience
        • 35 professors
        • 125 students
        • Named nation’s number one college for nanotechnology by Small Times magazine (May 2006)
        • continued
  • 25. University at Albany’s College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering .. continued
      • Member Fees/Dues
        • None
      • Wafer Capability
        • 200 MM
        • 300 MM
  • 26. Michigan
      • Michigan has a strong IP position vis-à-vis universities UM is considered one of the top five MEMS/MST research universities in the US
        • Peer reviewed papers per year
        • Total number of enrolled graduate students in MEMS
        • Quality of teaching/research staff/industry reputation
        • Annual R&D contract dollars
      • Michigan State and Wayne State have demonstrated competencies in MEMS materials (diamond, aluminum nitrite)
      • Small number of Michigan MEMS/MST companies to date
        • Dexter Research
        • Issys
        • Handy Lab
        • Sensicore
        • Discera
        • Advanced Sensor Technology
        • continued
  • 27. Michigan, continued
      • Commercial manufacturing infrastructure available through Issys
      • Early VC/financial support (Ardesta)
      • New fab at Wayne State (June 2002) may provide well needed R&D/prototype/production capability
      • Extensive University of Michigan R&D facilities
      • Creation of Wireless Integrated Microsystems (WIMS) facility
      • Major support of media promotional programs and regional organizations…Small Times, Business Week
  • 28. Washington Technology Center (WTC)
      • Founded
        • 1997
      • Number of Employees
        • 25
      • Number of Current Clients
        • 17 companies
        • 39 university research groups
        • 160 total registered users (University of Washington)
      • Facilities/Capabilities
        • 14,400 square feet total
        • 8,000 square feet of class 10,000 or better
        • Surface and bulk micromachining capability, DRIE machine
      • continued
  • 29. Washington Technology Center (WTC), continued
      • Technical Focus
        • Silicon nitride
        • Photonics MEMS/Microsystems
        • Bio MEMS/Microsystems
      • Mission Plan
        • To positively affect the creation and retention of jobs in Washington-based companies by increasing the effectiveness and ability of those companies to adopt and deploy technology that leverages the investment made in research at the state universities
        • To support research at the state’s two research universities (University of Washington, Washington State University) as well as at the three regional universityies (Eastern, Western and Central Washington Universities)
      • Number of Jobs Created
        • 50-75
      • continued
  • 30. Washington Technology Center (WTC), continued
      • Companies Catalyzed
        • Micronics - light photonics
        • Neah Power - Mesosystems
        • NuElement - MEMSTek
        • Also, facilities have been used by numerous local companies including Microvision, Honeywell/Allied Signal, Eldec, Aculight
      • Membership Fees/Dues
        • Each individual user is charged at a $125.00 per hour rate
      • Wafer Capability…4’ and 6”
      • Funding…$6.5 million 19995-1999
      • continued
  • 31. Washington Technology Center (WTC), continued
      • Website
        • http://www.watechcenter.org
      • Additional Comments
        • WTC provides a quarterly newsletter and conducts yearly MEMS/Microsystems all-day conference
  • 32. MINATEC (Grenoble, France)
    • Founded
        • 2000 (Although CEA/LETI, the “father of MINATEC” was started in 1967)
    • Number of Employees
        • 10 (MINATEC)
        • 700 (CEA/LETI)
    • Number of Current Clients
        • None (MINATEC)
        • 300 (CEA/LETI)
    • Facilities/Capabilities
        • None as of yet, planned facilities include:
          • A large campus of 120,000 square meters is planned for completion by the end of 2003
    • continued
  • 33. MINATEC (Grenoble, France), continued
    • Technical Focus
        • Multidisciplinary approach to creating biochips, microsystems for medical applications, medical imaging; hardware/software integration, communication systems; nanotech materials; polymer science, nanomagnetism; electron microscopy
    • Mission Plan
        • To create a central organization for the design, development and commercialization of a broad spectrum of micro and nano technologies through an integrated approach and education, research and industrial transfer
    • Number of Jobs (to be) Created
        • Approximately 3,500 at full capacity
          • Two engineering schools
          • Joint laboratories
    • continued
  • 34. MINATEC (Grenoble, France), continued
    • Funding
        • City of Grenoble
        • French Department
        • Regional Government… 50 - 60M Euros ($45.4 - $54.5M U.S.)
        • CEA (French Government… 25 - 40M Euros ($22.7 - $36.4M U.S.)
        • VC, Industry, Private Funds… 50M Euros ($45.4M U.S.)
        • No direct European Community funding
        • Over the past 20 years, 1.3B FF ($186M U.S.) have been invested in CEA/LETI by the French Government
    • Membership Fees
        • MINATEC created companies will provide equity to the MINATEC organization
    • Wafer Capability
        • CEA/LETI has 200 MM (8”) wafers
      • continued
  • 35. MINATEC (Grenoble, France), continued
    • Companies Catalyzed (CEA/LETI)
        • 23 including:
          • STMicroelectronic - integrated circuits
          • SOITECH - silicon-on-insulator wafers
          • Tronics - pressure sensors
          • PHS MEMS - photonic and R.F. MEMS/Microsystems
          • MEMSCAP - MEMS software, photonic and R.F. MEMS
  • 36. Glennan Microsystems Initiative - Ohio
      • Founded
        • 1998
      • Objective
        • Provide for reseach, development and commercialization of silicon carbide-based technology for NASA and the merchant market community
      • Number of Current Clients
        • 22
      • Facilities/Capability
        • NASA
          • 4,000 square feet of class 1000 or better
          • 2” silicon carbine wafer capability bulk micromachining process, DRIE machine
          • continued
  • 37. Glennan Microsystems Initiative - Ohio.. continued
      • Microfabrication Lab (at Case Western Reserve)
        • 5,000 square feet of class 100 or better
        • 4” and 6” silicon wafer capability
        • 4” silicon carbide
        • Surface micromachining process
        • Bulk micromaching process capability planning to be installed
        • Semiconductor electronics capability used for prototyping only
      • Technical Focus
        • Silicon carbide material-based sensors for extreme environment applications (e.g. media, temperature)
        • Availability of “MUSIC” (multi-user silicon carbide) process in August, 2001 (similar to “MUMPS”)
          • Provides convenient and cost-effective means to develop silicon carbide-based products to the merchant market
          • First run December 17, 2001
          • 12 designs for 12 different companies
        • continued
  • 38. Glennan Microsystems Initiative - Ohio.. continued
      • Mission Plan
        • To be the leading provider of NASA and CASE developed silicon carbide-based technology to NASA and to the commercial market and to help accelerate the development of silicon carbide sensors and electronic for extreme environments
        • Long-term vision is to create a volume production facility, however at this time a detailed plan has not been developed.
      • Funding
        • 1998 $1.5M 2001 $4.3M
        • 1999 $4.2M 2002 $3.8M
        • 2000 $5.0M
        • NASA’s contribution was $16.5M
        • State of Ohio contribution was $4.8M
      • Companies Catalyzed
        • Orbital - high temperature pressue sensors
        • Movaz - optical MEMS components
        • Fiberlead - optical MEMS packaging
        • Makel - chemical sensors
      • continued
  • 39.
      • Membership Fees/Dues
        • $25K for large companies (SBA definition)
        • $2.5K for not large companies
      • Additional Comments
        • Nine Sigma responsible and under contract for administering the MUSIC program
    Glennan Microsystems Initiative - Ohio.. continued
  • 40. .
    • THANK YOU / MUCHAS GRACIAS
  • 41. For More Information
    • Copies of the entire Power Point can be obtained by visiting
    • … www.rgrace.com/pueblaclusters2006
    • Please feel free to contact me by email
    • … [email_address]