Power Librarianship

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You have the power to lead, change you workplace, and collaborate not only across offices but also across the world. In this exciting session, you will learn about innovative strategies for becoming a …

You have the power to lead, change you workplace, and collaborate not only across offices but also across the world. In this exciting session, you will learn about innovative strategies for becoming a leader and setting up the workplace systems to support open communications across your organization to facilitate collaboration. Learn about new technology systems for managing collaboration and how you can be a change agent within your organization for growth.

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  • 1. Power Librarianship Setting Sail for Leadership and Collaboration
  • 2.
    • Goals for today:
    • Learn how to be a change agent
    • Review leadership and strategies for working together
    • Explore my top 20 tools for working together.
    • Open session to explore specific concerns and problems.
  • 3. What is organizational change?
    • Forms of change.
      • Radical change.
        • Also known as frame-breaking change.
        • Change that results in a major overhaul of the organization or its component systems.
      • Incremental change.
        • Also known as frame-bending change.
        • Change that is part of the organization’s natural evolution.
  • 4. What is organizational change?
    • Change agents = YOU!
      • Individuals and groups who take responsibility for changing the existing behavior patterns of an organization.
      • Managers and leaders in contemporary organizations are expected to be change agents.
  • 5. What is organizational change?
    • Unplanned change.
      • Occurs spontaneously or randomly.
      • May be disruptive or beneficial.
      • The appropriate goal is to act quickly to minimize any negative consequences and maximize any possible benefits.
  • 6. What is organizational change?
    • Planned change.
      • The result of specific efforts by a change agent.
      • A performance gap is a direct response to a perceived performance gap.
        • A discrepancy between the actual and desired state of affairs.
        • May reflect problems or opportunities.
  • 7. What is organizational change?
    • Organizational forces for change.
      • Organization-environment relationships.
      • Organizational life cycle.
      • Political nature of organizations.
  • 8. What is organizational change?
    • Organizational targets for change.
      • Purpose.
      • Objectives.
      • Strategy.
      • Culture
      • People.
      • Tasks.
      • Structure
      • Technology.
  • 9. What is organizational change?
    • Phases of planned change.
      • Unfreezing.
        • Preparing a situation for change by disconfirming existing attitudes and behaviors.
        • Susceptibility to “boiled frog phenomenon.”
      • Changing.
        • Taking action to modify a situation by altering the targets of change.
      • Refreezing.
        • Maintaining and eventually institutionalizing the change.
  • 10. What change strategies are used in organizations?
    • Force-coercion strategy.
      • Draws on reward power, coercive power, and legitimate power as primary inducements to change.
      • Change agent acts unilaterally to command change.
      • Usually results in temporary compliance.
  • 11. What change strategies are used in organizations?
    • Rational persuasion strategy.
      • Also known as an empirical-rational strategy.
      • Draws on expert power as primary inducement to change.
      • Change agent uses special knowledge, empirical support, or rational arguments.
      • Usually results in long-term internalization.
  • 12. What change strategies are used in organizations?
    • Shared power strategy.
      • Also known as a normative-reeducative approach.
      • Draws on referent power as primary inducement to change.
      • Change agent empowers people affected by the change and involves them in decision making related to the change.
      • Usually results in long-term internalization.
  • 13. What can be done about resistance to change?
    • Resistance to change.
      • Any attitude or behavior that indicates unwillingness to make or support a desired change.
      • Alternative views of resistance.
        • Something that must be overcome for change to be successful.
        • Feedback that can be used to facilitate achieving change objectives.
  • 14. What can be done about resistance to change?
    • Why people resist change.
      • Fear of the unknown.
      • Lack of good information.
      • Fear for loss of security.
      • No reason to change.
      • Fear for loss of power.
      • Lack of resources.
      • Bad timing.
      • Habit.
  • 15. What can be done about resistance to change?
    • Ways in which resistance is experienced.
      • Resistance to the change itself.
      • Resistance to the change strategy.
      • Resistance to the change agent.
  • 16. What can be done about resistance to change?
    • How to deal with resistance.
      • Education and communication.
      • Participation and involvement.
      • Facilitation and support.
      • Negotiation and agreement.
      • Manipulation
      • Explicit and implicit coercion.
  • 17. What can be done about resistance to change?
    • Education and communication.
      • Educates people about change prior to implementation and helps them understand the logic of change.
      • Use when people lack information or have inaccurate information.
      • Advantage — c reates willingness to help with the change.
      • Disadvantage — c an be very time consuming.
  • 18. What can be done about resistance to change?
    • Participation and involvement.
      • Allows people to help design and implement the changes.
      • Use when other people have important information and/or power to resist.
      • Advantages — adds information to change planning; builds commitment to change .
      • Disadvantage — can be very time consuming .
  • 19. What can be done about resistance to change?
    • Facilitation and support.
      • Provides emotional and material assistance for people experiencing the hardships of change.
      • Use when resistance traces to resource or adjustment problems.
      • Advantage — directly satisfies specific resource or adjustment needs.
      • Disadvantages — can be time consuming; can be expensive.
  • 20. What can be done about resistance to change?
    • Negotiation and agreement.
      • Offers incentives to actual or potential change resistors.
      • Use when a person or group will lose something because of the change.
      • Advantage — helps avoid major resistance.
      • Disadvantages — can be expensive; can cause others to seek similar deals.
  • 21. What can be done about resistance to change?
    • Manipulation
      • Use covert attempts to influence others by selectively providing information and consciously structuring events.
      • Use when other methods don’t work or are too expensive.
      • Advantages — can be quick and inexpensive.
      • Disadvantage — can create future problems if people sense manipulation.
  • 22. What can be done about resistance to change?
    • Explicit and implicit coercion.
      • Employ the force of authority to implement change.
      • Use when speed is important and the change agent has power.
      • Advantages — quick; overpowers resistance.
      • Disadvantage — risky if people get mad.
  • 23. Leadership is Change
    • There are many definitions…
    • The essence of leadership is change – it is getting people to do things that they otherwise would not do on their own.
  • 24. Strategies for Working Together
    • Barriers to working together (3Ts)
      • Time
      • Trust
      • Turf
    • Variance with the 3Ts impact strategy…
  • 25. Networking
    • NETWORKING is defined as exchanging information for mutual benefit.
    • Networking is the most informal of the inter-organizational linkages and often reflects an initial level of trust, limited time availability, and a reluctance to share turf.
  • 26. Coordinating
    • COORDINATING is defined as exchanging information and altering activities for mutual benefit and to achieve a common purpose.
    • Coordinating requires more organizational involvement than networking and is a very crucial change strategy. Coordinated services are "user-friendly" and eliminate or reduce barriers for those seeking access to them.
    • Compared to networking, coordinating involves more time, higher levels of trust yet little or no access to each other's turf.
  • 27. Cooperating
    • COOPERATING is defined as exchanging information, altering activities, and sharing resources for mutual benefit and to achieve a common purpose.
    • Cooperating requires greater organizational commitments than networking or coordinating and, in some cases, may involve written (perhaps, even legal) agreements.
    • Shared resources can encompass a variety of human, financial, and technical contributions, including knowledge, staffing, physical property, access to people, money, and others.
    • Cooperating can require a substantial amount of time, high levels of trust, and significant access to each other's turf.
  • 28. Collaborating
    • COLLABORATING is defined as exchanging information, altering activities, sharing resources, and enhancing the capacity of another for mutual benefit and to achieve a common purpose.
    • The qualitative difference between collaborating and cooperating in this definition is the willingness of organizations (or individuals) to enhance each other's capacity for mutual benefit and a common purpose
    • Collaborating is usually characterized by substantial time commitments, very high levels of trust, and extensive areas of common turf.
  • 29. Definition Networking   Exchanging information for mutual benefit Coordinating   Exchanging information for mutual benefit, and altering activities to achieve a common purpose Cooperating   Exchanging information for mutual benefit, and altering activities and sharing resources to achieve a common purpose Collaborating   Exchanging information for mutual benefit, and altering activities, sharing resources, and enhancing the capacity of another to achieve a common purpose Relationship Informal Formal Formal Formal Characteristics Minimal time commitments, limited levels of trust, and no necessity to share turf ; information exchange is the primary focus Moderate time commitments, moderate levels of trust, and no necessity to share turf; making access to services or resources more user-friendly is the primary focus Substantial time commitments, high levels of trust, and significant access to each other’s turf; sharing of resources to achieve a common purpose is the primary focus Extensive time commitments, very high levels of trust and extensive areas of common turf; enhancing each other’s capacity to achieve a common purpose is the primary focus Resources No mutual sharing of resources necessary No or minimal mutual sharing of resources necessary Moderate to extensive mutual sharing of resources and sharing risks, responsibilities, and rewards Full sharing of resources, and full sharing of risks, responsibilities, and rewards
  • 30. A Few of My Favorite Tools Bubble.us – On Demand Brainstorming Stixy – For Those of Us That Organize with Post-Its Google Docs – Top document collaboration system
  • 31. Twiddla - On-demand sandbox. Skype – Advanced video conference / VoIP ProjectPier – Project Management System - Geek Friendly
  • 32. Vyew – Synchronous & Asynchronous Web Meetings Keep and Share – Document and Calendar Hosting Writeboard – “Wiki Like” Online Collaboration
  • 33. 37signals – The de facto standard in online collaboration. Teambox – Online Project Management ZoHo – The big box retailer of all things collaboration.
  • 34. Wridea – Idea collection and management. TeamworkPM – Friendly but powerful project management. RememberTheMilk (RTM) – To Do List Management - GTD
  • 35. Doodle – Never have to coordinate a meeting time again. CoMindWork - Project management for the power user. UserVoice – Crowdsourced idea management and coordination.
  • 36. StreamWork – Web-based Decision Support System (DSS). Yammer –Micro-blogging and messaging for your organization.
  • 37. Thank You Roger Conner [email_address] 1-800-919-0824 x2