• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Dislipidemia y diabetes
 

Dislipidemia y diabetes

on

  • 6,118 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
6,118
Views on SlideShare
6,118
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
169
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Production of HDL by Liver and Intestine High-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles are formed in plasma from the coalescence of individual phospholipid-apolipoprotein complexes. HDL and its major apolipoprotein, apoA-I, are synthesized by both the liver and the intestine. The other primary apolipoprotein, apoA-II, is synthesized only by the liver.   References: Eisenberg S. High-density lipoprotein metabolism. J Lipid Res. 1984;25:1017–1058. Breslow JL. Familial disorders of high-density lipoprotein metabolism. In: Scriver CR, Beaudet AL, Sly WS, Valle D, eds. The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of Inherited Disease. 7 th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill; 1995:2031–2052. Hussain MM, Zannis VI. Intracellular modification of human apolipoprotein AII (apoAII) and sites of apoII synthesis: comparison of apoAII with apoCII and apoCII isoproteins. Biochemistry. 1990;29:209–217.
  • HDL Metabolism and Reverse Cholesterol Transport Cholesterol that is synthesized or deposited in peripheral tissues is returned to the liver in a process referred to as reverse cholesterol transport in which high-density lipoprotein (HDL) plays a central role. HDL may be secreted by the liver or intestine in the form of nascent particles consisting of phospholipid and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I). Nascent HDL interacts with peripheral cells, such as macrophages, to facilitate the removal of excess free cholesterol (FC), a process facilitated by the ATP-binding cassette protein 1 (ABC1) gene. FC is generated in part by the hydrolysis of intracellular cholesteryl ester (CE) stores. HDL is then converted into mature CE–rich HDL as a result of the plasma cholesterol-esterifying enzyme lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), which is activated by apoA-I. CE may be removed by several different pathways, including selective uptake by the liver, ie, the removal of lipid without the uptake of HDL proteins (shown in this slide). Selective uptake appears to be mediated by the scavenger receptor class-B, type I (SR-BI), which is expressed in the liver and has been shown to be a receptor for HDL. CE derived from HDL contributes to the hepatic–cholesterol pool used for bile acid synthesis. Cholesterol is eventually excreted from the body either as bile acid or as free cholesterol in the bile.   References: Fielding CJ, Fielding PE. Molecular physiology of reverse cholesterol transport. J Lipid Res. 1995;36:211–228. Breslow JL. Familial disorders of high-density lipoprotein metabolism. In: Scriver CR, Beaudet AL, Sly WS, Valle D, eds. The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of Inherited Disease. 7 th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill; 1995:2031–2052. Acton S, Rigotti A, Landschulz KT, et al. Identification of scavenger receptor SR-BI as a high-density lipoprotein receptor. Science. 1996;271:518–520.
  • Role of CETP in HDL Metabolism This slide shows the selective uptake of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesteryl ester (CE), described in the previous slide, together with another important pathway of reverse cholesterol transport involving the action of plasma CE transfer protein (CETP). CE can be transferred from HDL to apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing proteins, such as very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs) and low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), by CETP. Through uptake of LDL by the liver via hepatic LDL receptors, cholesterol can then be returned to the liver, where it may eventually be excreted as bile. (This slide also illustrates the current belief that only modified apoB-containing proteins are taken up by macrophages. “Oxidation” is given as an example of modification.)   References Havel RJ, Kane JP. Introduction: structure and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins. In: Scriver CR, Beaudet AL, Sly WS, Valle D, eds. The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of Inherited Disease. 7 th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill; 1995:1841–1851. Tall AR. Plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein. J Lipid Res. 1993;34:1255–1274. Steinberg D. A docking receptor for HDL cholesterol esters. Science. 1996;271:460–461.
  • Role of Hepatic Lipase and Lipoprotein Lipase in HDL Metabolism Dietary (exogenous) fat is absorbed into chylomicrons (CMs). In endogenous lipid synthesis, the liver synthesizes triglycerides (TGs) and cholesteryl esters (CEs) and packages them into very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs). The enzyme lipoprotein lipase (LPL), bound to the surface of the capillary endothelium (especially in muscle and adipose tissue), hydrolyzes TG in CMs and in VLDLs. Apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II), found on CMs, is a required cofactor for LPL. The free fatty acids generated from TG hydrolysis are a source of energy or fat storage, and the resulting CM remnant (CMR) is released and is eventually taken up by the liver. VLDL, which contains the major structural protein apoB-100, is hydrolyzed by LPL to form intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL). Secreted CMs contain apoAs, which are transferred with phospholipids into the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) fraction during lipolysis. Similar HDL particles (HDL 2 ) may be formed as a byproduct of the lipolysis of VLDL. Hepatic lipase, found primarily on the endothelium of the hepatic sinusoids, hydrolyses HDL 2 TG and phospholipids to form small HDL 3 particles, 2 which may be cleared by the kidney.   References: Brunzell JD. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency and other causes of the chylomicronemia syndrome. In: Scriver CR, Beaudet AL, Sly WS, Valle D, eds. The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of Inherited Disease. 7 th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill; 1995:1913–1932. Breslow JL. Familial disorders of high-density lipoprotein metabolism. In: Scriver CR, Beaudet AL, Sly WS, Valle D, eds. The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of Inherited Disease. 7 th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill; 1995:2031–2052. Rader DJ. Lipid disorders. In: Topol EJ, ed. Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. Philadelphia: Lippincott-Raven; 1998:59–90.
  • National Lipid Education Council Program—Section 6
  • © 2003 PPS ® National Lipid Education Council ®
  • © 2003 PPS ® National Lipid Education Council ®

Dislipidemia y diabetes Dislipidemia y diabetes Presentation Transcript

  • Curso de Post-Grado en Diabetes Mellitus CEDIMO – Esc. de Medicina, ITESM Dr. Sergio Zúñiga Guajardo
  • Alteraciones de Lipoproteínas en la Diabetes Mellitus
    • Dr. Sergio Zúñiga Guajardo
    • Endocrinólogo
    • Centro de Diabetes Monterrey
    • Clínica Cuauhtémoc y Famosa
    • Fac. de Medicina y Hospital Universitario, U. A. N. L.
  • Vía Exógena del Metabolismo de Lipoproteínas AI E AIV AII B48 CII AI E AIV AII B48 CII Hígado CIII Adipocitos de músculo y pulmón LPL AGL AGL Col Grasa de la dieta Sist. Fagocítico mononuclear TG CII CIII HDL L-CAT CE Apos PL PTEC E Quilomicrón Remanente de quilomicrón TG + Glicerol
  • Vía Endógena del Metabolismo de Lipoproteínas E B100 CII B100 Hígado LPL TG HDL L-CAT CE Apos PL PTEC VLDL TG, CT B-100, PL B100 E CII Apos PL AI HTGL RE RB100 Tejidos periféricos Mecanismos independientes del receptor Acidos biliares CE CL Remanentes IDL LDL Hígado Adipocitos músculo y pulmón AGL
  • AI AIV AII Hígado TG HDL L-CAT CE Apos PL PTEC HDL naciente HDL 2 PL L-CAT Tejidos periféricos CE CL CL Lipoproteínas ricas en triglicéridos Ac. biliares Circulación Entero-hepática Metabolismo de las HDL
  • Production of HDL by Liver and Intestine A-I A-I A-II A-I, A-II = apolipoprotein A-I, A-II Liver Intestine HDL HDL
  • HDL Metabolism and Reverse Cholesterol Transport A-I Liver CE CE CE FC FC LCAT FC Bile SR-BI A-I ABC1 = ATP-binding cassette protein 1; A-I = apolipoprotein A-I; CE = cholesteryl ester; FC = free cholesterol; LCAT = lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase; SR-BI = scavenger receptor class BI ABC1 Macrophage Mature HDL Nascent HDL
  • Role of CETP in HDL Metabolism A-I Liver CE CE FC FC LCAT FC Bile SR-BI A-I ABC1 Macrophage CE B CETP = cholesteryl ester transfer protein; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; LDLR = low-density lipoprotein receptor; VLDL = very-low-density lipoprotein LDLR VLDL/LDL CETP Mature HDL Nascent HDL CE SRA Oxidation
  • Role of Hepatic Lipase and Lipoprotein Lipase in HDL Metabolism CM = chylomicron; CMR = chylomicron remnant; HDL = high-density lipoprotein; HL = hepatic lipase; IDL = intermediate-density lipoprotein; LPL = lipoprotein lipase; PL = phospholipase; TG = triglyceride B Kidney Endothelium B TG CMR/IDL C-II CM/VLDL HL LPL A-I CE TG HDL 2 PL A-I CE HDL 3 PL Phospholipids and apolipoproteins
  • Clasificación de las Dislipidemias por su orígen.
    • Primarias:
      • Esporádicas
      • Familiares
        • monogénicas
        • poligénicas
    • Secundarias
  • Clasificación por fenotipos Frederickson y Levy SI Lechoso VLDL/QM TG V Si Turbio VLDL TG IV SI Turbio IDL Col/TG III Si Turbio LDL / VLDL Col/TG IIB Si Claro LDL Col IIA No Lechoso Quilomicrones TG I Aterosclerosis Suero Lipoproteína Lípidos Fenotipo
  • Clasificación práctica y simple.
    • Hipercolesterolemia: cuando sólo se eleva el CT o predomina sobre los TG.
    • Hipertrigliceridemia: cuando sólo se elevan los TG o predominan sobre el CT.
    • Mixtas: CT y TG elevados.
  • Etiología de las dislipidemias mixtas
    • SECUNDARIAS
    • Diabetes Mellitus
    • Síndrome de resistencia a la insulina
    • Embarazo
    • Síndrome nefrótico e insuficiencia renal
    • Diálisis y hemodiálisis
    • Medicamentos
  • Estudios de laboratorio útiles en pacientes con Hiperlipidemias mixtas
    • Glucosa y Hb A1c
    • Exámen general de orina.
    • Creatinina
    • Fosfatasa alcalina
    • TSH
    • Electroforesis de lipoproteínas
    • Apoproteína ß sérica
  • Resistencia a la insulina Tejido adiposo Carbohidratos Grasas Proteínas Glucosa sanguínea Enzimas digestivas t. digestivo Páncreas Músculo Hígado Insulina Exceso en producción de glucosa Disminución en la captación de Glucosa dependiente de insulina Lipólisis excesiva que provoca un aumento en los ácidos grasos libres Falla en primera fase y aumento compensatorio en la segunda fase de la secreción de insulina
  • Prevalencia de Factores de Riesgo para las ECNT en individuos de > 20 años de edad en México Consumo excesivo de sal (3) 75.0% Consumo de alcohol (1) 66.0% Hipercolesterolemia 43.3% (5) Sedentarismo (2) 55.0% Proteinuria** 9.2%** Tabaquismo 36.6%** Obesidad 24.4%** Hipertensión arterial 30.0%** Diabetes 10.7%** GCAA (4) 12.7%** Fuente: ENEC 1993* Y 2000**.CENAVE.SSA (1) más de 30 ml al día. (2) falta de actividad física de manera habitual. (3) más de 6 gramos al día. (4) Glucosa capilar en ayuno anormal 110-125mg/dl. (5) Estudio de las seis ciudades.UDM. Síndrome metabólico 13.6% *OMS NCEP (5) 26.6% Peso promedio 70.0Kg** Talla baja 20.7% (5) Cintura promedio 95.4cm Sobrepeso 38.0% Hipertrigliceridemia 25.3% LDL >130mg dl 31.7%
  • Fuente: ENEC93.Velázquez MO et al.Arch Cardiol Mex 2002;72:71-84 y 2003;73:62-77 Lara EA, Rosas PM, Velázquez MO. Et al.Arch Cardiol Mex 2004;74:231-245 Situación en México, 1993-2000 Prevalencia (%) 2004 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 1993 2000 Diabetes Obesidad Hipertensión Tabaquismo Colesterol 27.0 43.1 26.0 36.6 26.6 30.0 21.4 24.4 8.2 10.7
  • Prevalencia de hipercolesterolemia > 240 mg/dl, según grupo de edad. Fuente: Dirección General de Epidemiolgía/ Instituto Nacional de Nutrición “Salvador Zubirán*/ Encuesta Nacional de Enfermedades Crónicas 1993. 3.2 4.2 7.7 10.2 10.5 13.5 14.9 15.8 17.4 15.4 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 Grupos de edad P o r c e n t a j e
  • Prevalencia de Dislipidemias en México Fuente: ENEC 93. Aguilar-Salinas C et al. J Lipid Res 2001; 42 1298-307 Hombres Mujeres Dislipidemia (%) (%) Global
    • Colesterol total > 200 mg/dL 30.0 25.0 27.1
    • Colesterol total > 240 mg/dL 8.1 6.2 7.0
    • C-LDL > 130 mg/dL 21.3 21.4 21.4
    • C-LDL > 160 mg/dL 12.0 8.8 10.2
    • Triglicéridos > 200 mg/dL 31.9 18.8 24.3
    • Tg < 200 / C-HDL < 35 mg/dL. 22.0 16.1 18.6
    • Tg > 200 / C-HDL < 35 mg/dL. 20.9 7.2 12.9
    • Dislipidemia mixta 16.8 9.6 12.6
  • 25.1 2 9.8 40.1 46.1 5 3. 3 56.3 5 7 . 5 5 7.8 5 5.1 43.3 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 Total 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 % Diagnosticados Dx por encuesta 81% 19% años * Ponderación de acuerdo a INEGI 2000 Prevalencia de hipercolesterolemia > 200mg/ dl por grupos de edad( n:120,000) Fuente: Lara EA, Rosas PM, Velázquez MO. Et al.Arch Cardiol Mex 2004;74:231-245
  • * Distribución Poblacional según Censo 2000 Prevalencia de Hipercolesterolemia > 200mg/dl por grupos de edad y sexo en población urbana. 2004 Prevalencia 43.3% 21.6 millones Fuente: Lara EA, Rosas PM, Velázquez MO. Et al.Arch Cardiol Mex 2004;74:231-245 75% menores < 54 años 16.2 millones 65-69 60-64 55-59 50-54 45-49 40-44 35-39 30-34 25-29 20-24 0 0 1 5 MUJERES HOMBRES 23.3% 24.0% 26.5% 35.4% 44.0% 54.2% 59.4% 62.0% 62.3% 63.0% 32.3% 33.3% 45.6% 49.0% 51.9% 52.2% 48.5% 46.9% 50.0% 26.9% 2 3 4 5 1 4 3 2 millones de habitantes Grupos de edad (años)
  • Prevalencia de hipercolesterolemia por subgrupos de riesgo. México, 2004 * Edad expresada en años; HTA,Hipertensión Arterial; (-), ausencia; (+), presencia. (Consolidación Conjuntiva ) Grupos de Edad 20-34 35-54 55-59 Sexo Femenino HTA(-) HTA(+) HTA(-) HTA(+) HTA(-) HTA(+) Índice de Masa Corporal < 25 kg/m2 18.8% 23.2% 38.0% 50.2% 47.4% 59.6% 25-29.9 kg/m2 28.8% 34.3% 45.5% 53.5% 56.8% 64.3% > 30 kg/m2 32.7% 38.1% 44.8% 51.4% 55.7% 58.6% TOTAL 25.6% 33.4% 43.3% 51.7% 53.8% 60.8% Sexo Masculino HTA(-) HTA(+) HTA(-) HTA(+) HTA(-) HTA(+) Índice de Masa Corporal < 25 kg/m2 20.7% 29.5% 39.6% 53.4% 36.7% 49.5% 25-29.9 kg/m2 34.2% 39.4% 48.6% 53.8% 41.7% 49.6% > 30 kg/m2 39.9% 44.5% 47.9% 51.7% 44.5% 46.3% TOTAL 31.3% 39.7% 46.5% 52.9% 40.8% 48.5% Fuente: Lara EA, Rosas PM, Velázquez MO. Et al.Arch Cardiol Mex 2004;74:231-245
  • Prevalencia de Hiperlipidemia en Pacientes adultos con Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2
    • Estudio Multinacional de la O. M. S.:
    Colesterol > 6.72 22.6 23.5 23.1 4.65 - 6.70 58.2 59.3 58.8 < 4.65 19.3 17.2 18.2 TGL > 2.82 19.2 1.13 - 2.81 56.2 < 1.13 24.6 Hombres % Mujeres % Ambos %
  • Abnormal Lipid Levels in Women With Type 2 Diabetes 21 8 31 16 10 24 38 15 25* 17* 0 10 20 30 40 50 Women without diabetes Women with diabetes TC  275 TG  200 VLDL-C  35 LDL-C  190 HDL-C  41 Prevalence (%) * P <0.05. LRC approximate 90th percentile age- and sex-matched values, except for HDL-C (10th percentile). Adapted from Garg A, Grundy SM. Diabetes Care. 1990;13:153-169. TM © 1999 Professional Postgraduate Services ®
  • Fuente: ENEC 1993. Prevalencia de las Dislipidemias en México 11.2% * 88.8% Hipercolesterolemia Normal Población de 20 a 69 años *NOM para la prevención, tratamiento y control de las dislipidemias (200 mg/dl), Sep. 2001
  • Prevalencia de las Dislipidemias en México 36.9% 63.1% Hipoalfalipo_ proteínemia Normal Población de 20 a 69 años Fuente: ENEC 1993.
  • Prevalencia de las Dislipidemias en México 37.6% * 62.4% Hipertrigliceridemia Normal Población de 20 a 69 años Fuente: ENEC 1993. *NOM para la Prevención, Tratamiento y control de las Dislipidemias (150mg/dl), Sept. 2001.
  • FUENTE: DGE/INNSZ/ENEC 93 Prevalencia nacional de hipercolesterolemia según nivel educativo % Nivel Educativo
  • FUENTE: DGE/INNSZ/ENEC 93 Distribución de los Niveles de Colesterol Total en la Población % mg / dl N= 13,733
  • % Grupo de Edad FUENTE: DGE/INNSZ/ENEC 93 Prevalencia de Hipercolesterolemia según Grupo de Edad
  • Recomendable Limítrofe Alto riesgo Muy alto riesgo CT <200 200-239  240 ------- C-LDL <130 130-159  160  190 TG <150 150-200 >200 >1000 C-HDL >35 ------- <35 ------- Clasificación de los lípidos concentración sanguínea (mg/dl) NOM Sep 2001
  • DETECCIÓN
    • En sujetos con factores de riesgo o antecedentes familiares de trastornos de lípidos, Diabetes Mellitus , HAS, o Cardiopatía Coronaria:
    • Se realizará a partir de los 20 años con una periodicidad anual o bianual de acuerdo con el criterio del médico.
  • Hipertensión 26.6% Obesidad 21.0% Diabetes 11.8 %* Consumo de alcohol (1) 66.0% Hipercolesterolemia 11.2% Hipertrigliceridemia 37.6% Sedentarismo (2) 55.0% Tabaquismo 25.0% Consumo de sal (3) 75.0%
    • Fuente: DGE/INNSZ/ENEC 1993.
    • más de 3g al día.
    (2) falta de actividad física habitual. (3) más de 6 gramos al día. Prevalencia de Factores de Riesgo Cardiovascular en Individuos de 20 a 69 años de Edad en México  de C-HDL 36.9% * ENSA 2000
  • APORTE ENERGETICO DERIVADO DEL CONSUMO DE PROTEINAS, CARBOHIDRATOS Y GRASAS Proteínas Carbohidratos Grasas Relación del tipo de grasa % 33 46 21 % 12 46 42 Polinsaturadas/Saturadas Ingesta diaria Sodio (mg) Potasio (mg) 1.41 0.44 11,000 690 3,400 2,400 Hombre del paleolítico Hombre contemporáneo
  • Efecto de la Diabetes en la Lipemia post-prandial
  •  
  •  
  • Anormalidades causadas en el metabolismo de las lipoproteinas en el síndrome metabólico Lipasa lipoproteica Contenido anormal de triglicéridos y colesterol VLDL LDL pequeñas y densas IDL Lipasa hepática HDL-2 Insulina Acidos grasos apoCIII
  • Resistencia a la insulina y metabolismo de lípidos
    • Disminuye la actividad de LPL
    • Aumenta la liberación de AGL y glicerol, triglicéridos
    • Disminuye la captación de glucosa
    AGLs, glicerol y glucosa Hiperproducción de VLDLs
  • A. G. L. : El enlace entre la Obesi dad y la Resist e nc ia a la Insulin a ? t ejido Adipos o Insulin a A G S Insulin a RESIST E NC IA A INSULIN A utiliza c i ó n de g lucos a produc c i ó n de g lucos a + +
  • Anormalidades causadas en el metabolismo de las lipoproteinas causadas por la hiperglucemia Lipasa lipoproteica Contenido anormal de triglicéridos y colesterol VLDL LDL pequeñas y densas IDL Lipasa hepática HDL-2 Insulina Acidos grasos apoCIII R-LDL
  • Anormalidades causadas en el metabolismo de las lipoproteinas en la diabetes tipo 1 en control adecuado Lipasa lipoproteica VLDL LDL IDL HDL-3 Insulina Acidos grasos R-LDL
  • Vía Exógena del Metabolismo de Lipoproteínas AI E AIV AII B48 CII AI E AIV AII B48 CII Hígado CIII Adipocitos de músculo y pulmón LPL AGL AGL CL Grasa de la dieta Sist. Fagocítico mononuclear TG CII CIII HDL L-CAT CE Apos PL PTEC E Quilomicrón Remanente de quilomicrón Insulina
  • Vía Endógena del Metabolismo de Lipoproteínas E B100 CII B100 Hígado LPL TG HDL L-CAT CE Apos PL PTEC VLDL TG, CT B-100, PL B100 E CII Apos PL AI HTGL RE RB100 Tejidos periféricos Mecanismos independientes del receptor Acidos biliares CE CL Remanentes IDL LDL Hígado Insulina Adipocitos de músculo y pulmón AGL
  • Alteraciones Lipoprot é icas en Pacientes Diabéticos
    • Colesterol Total normal
    • LDL-Colesterol normal, mas densas
    • Triglicéridos Totales elevados
    • VLDL-Tg elevados
    • VLDL-Colesterol elevado
    • HDL-Colesterol disminuído
    • LDL-c y HDL-col triglicéridos
    • IDL-colesterol aumentadas
    Laakso, Arterioesclerosis, 1990
  • DISLIPIDEMIA DIABÉTICA
    • HIPERTRIGLICERIDEMIA
    • C-HDL 
    • LDL pequeñas y densas
    NCEP mayo 2001 La diabetes se considera, per se, un FACTOR DE RIESGO CARDIOVASCULAR MUY ALTO Mortalidad del 20% a 10 años
  • Dislipidemia de la resistencia a la insulina: Características
    • Aumento en la secreción de VLDL
    • Aumento en la secreción de LDL pequeñas y densas
    • Hipertrigliceridemia
    • Disminución de la secreción de HDL
  • DISLIPIDEMIA DIABÉTICA Objetivos terapéuticos Objetivo primario: Reducir C-LDL a < de 100 mg/dl Objetivo secundario: Reducir COLESTEROL NO-HDL a menos de 130 mg/dl Alcanzar nivel META antes de tratar COLESTEROL NO-HDL
  • Prevención de las complicaciones crónicas de la DM-2
    • Prevención y evaluación de las complicaciones macrovasculares
    • Tratamiento de las dislipidemias
    • Mayor énfasis en su manejo y además deberá tratarse como si portara el paciente enfermedad cardiovascular
    • La glucosa deteriora el control de los lípidos por lo tanto es importante lograr su control.
  • L-TAP: Majority of Patients With CHD Do Not Reach NCEP LDL-C Targets 18 9.9 13 14.4 11.2 9.4 7.9 16.6 0 5 10 15 20 25 % of patients  100 101- 111- 121- 131- 141- 151- >160 110 120 130 140 150 160 LDL-C (mg/dL) on-treatment n = 1,460 Pearson TA et al. Arch Intern Med . 2000;160:459-467. Other L-TAP data courtesy of TA Pearson. TM © 2001, Professional Postgraduate Services ®
  • L-TAP: Majority of High-Risk Patients Without CHD Do Not Reach NCEP LDL-C Targets % of patients Pearson TA et al. Arch Intern Med . 2000;160:459-467. Other L-TAP data courtesy of TA Pearson. n = 2,285 <130 130- 140 141- 150 151- 160 161- 170 171- 180 181- 190 191- 200 >200 LDL-C (mg/dL) on-treatment TM © 2001, Professional Postgraduate Services ® 37 13.4 11.6 10.8 7.8 6.5 4.4 2.9 5.5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40
  • L-TAP: Patient Success in Achieving Target LDL-C Levels Pearson TA et al. Arch Intern Med . 2000;160:459-467. Nondrug therapy 282 361 108 751 861 1,924 1,352 4,137 Drug therapy No. % patient success Low risk ( P =0.001) High risk ( P <0.001) CHD ( P =0.004) All patients Note: P values based on univariate analysis comparing success rates among patients who did, and patients who did not, receive lipid-lowering therapy. TM © 2001, Professional Postgraduate Services ® 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80
  • Progression to Atherosclerotic Clinical Events in Patients With Diabetes AGE=advanced glycation end products; CRP=C-reactive protein; HDL=high-density lipoprotein; HTN=hypertension; IL-6=interleukin-6; LDL=low-density lipoprotein; PAI-1=plasminogen activator inhibitor-1; SAA=serum amyloid A protein; TF=tissue factor; TG=triglycerides; tPA=tissue-type plasminogen activator Biondi-Zoccai GGL et al. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2003;41:1071-1077. Subclinical Atherosclerosis Atherosclerotic Clinical Events Inflammation  IL-6  CRP  SAA Hyperglycemia  AGE  Oxidative stress Infection  Defense mechanisms  Pathogen burden Insulin Resistance HTN Endothelial dysfunction Dyslipidemia  LDL  TG  HDL Thrombosis  PAI-1  TF  tPA Disease Progression
  • ADA: Order of Priorities for Treatment of Diabetic Dyslipidemia in Adults
    • LDL-C lowering
      • first choice: HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins)
      • second choice: bile acid binding resin or fenofibrate
    • HDL-C raising
      • behavioral interventions (weight loss,  physical activity, smoking cessation)
      • difficult to achieve except with niacin, which should be used with caution, or fibric acid derivative
    • TG lowering*
      • first priority: glycemic control
      • fibric acid derivative (gemfibrozil, fenofibrate)
      • statins (moderately effective at high dose in patients with  TG and  LDL-C)
    *Behavioral modification is also a first-line intervention. ADA. Diabetes Care . 2003;26(suppl 1):S83-S86.
  • ADA: Order of Priorities for Treatment of Diabetic Dyslipidemia in Adults (cont’d)
    • Combined hyperlipidemia
      • first choice: improved glycemic control plus high-dose statin
      • second choice: improved glycemic control plus statin* plus fibric acid derivative* (gemfibrozil or fenofibrate)
      • third choice: improved glycemic control plus resin plus fibric acid derivative
            • or
      • improved glycemic control plus statin* plus niacin* (glycemic control must be monitored carefully)
    ADA. Diabetes Care . 2003;26(suppl 1):S83-S86. *Combination of statins with niacin and especially with gemfibrozil or fenofibrate may carry an increased risk for muscle toxicity.
  • Tratamiento de las dislipidemias en pacientes con diabetes
    • Normalización de la glucemia
    • Sustitución de fármacos que tengan efectos adversos sobre el perfil de lípidos
    • Algunos hipoglucemiantes tienen efectos sobre el perfil de lípidos
    • Evitar el consumo de alcohol y tabaco
    Aguilar Salinas CA et al. Rev Invest Clin 2000;52:325-63
  • Metas de tratamiento en el paciente con diabetes. Grado de control Bueno Aceptable Malo Glucemia en ayuno 80-100 100-125* >125** Glucemia postprandial 80-135 135-200* >200** HbA1 (%) < 8.5 8.5-9.5* >9.5** HbA1c (%) < 6.5 6.5-8 * > 8 ** Colesterol (mg/dl) < 200 200-240 > 240 Colesterol-LDL (mg/dl) < 100 100-129 >130 Colesterol-HDL (mg/dl) > 45 35-45 < 35 Triglicéridos (mg/dl) < 150 150-200 >200 Presión arterial <130/85 -------- >140/85 Colesterol noHDL < 130 IMC(kg/m 2 ) 20-25 >25 *En riesgo de sufrir complicaciones macrovasculares y bajo riesgo de desarrollar complicaciones microvasculares **En riesgo de sufrir complicaciones microvasculares y macrovasculares Consenso “Prevención de las complicaciones crónicas de la diabetes tipo 2” Aguilar Salinas CA et al. Rev Invest Clin 2000;52:325-63
    • Educación
    • Alimentación Balanceada
    • Ejercicio
    • Suspensión del tabaco y el alcohol
    • Eliminar medicamentos con efectos adversos en los lípidos
    • Estudio de la familia
    Tratamiento no farmacológico de las dislipidemias
  • Las dislipidemias son prevenibles; a excepción de las de origen genético o primarias. Los factores de riesgo modificables necesarios para la prevención y control de las dislipidemias son:
    • alimentación saludable
    • actividad física adecuada
    • control de peso
    • FASE I
    • Reducir contenido de grasas saturadas y colesterol
    • 25 a 35 % de grasas, no más del 10% saturadas
    • 50 a 60% carbohidratos complejos
    • No más del 20% de proteínas
    • Consumir menos de 300 mg de colesterol al día
    • Reduce 3 a 14% niveles de colesterol
    Plan de Alimentación Balanceada NOM 2001 Diario oficial DLXXV6 vol. 6, sept. 2001
    • FASE II
    • Si no se reduce C-LDL a 160 mg/dl después de 3 meses
    • Pacientes con daño cardíaco u otra enfermedad ateroesclerosa
    • Requiere asesoría por profesionales de la nutrición
    • Consumir menos de 200 mg de colesterol al día
    • Menos de 7% de las calorías provenientes de grasas saturadas
    NOM 2001 Diario oficial DLXXV6 vol. 6, sept. 2001 Plan de Alimentación Balanceada
    • ACTIVIDAD FISICA
    • TIPO AEROBICO
    • GRANDES GRUPOS MUSCULARES CAMINATA (PASO VIGOROSO),
    • BICICLETA, NATACION......
    • 3 - 4 VECES POR SEMANA
    • Período de Calentamiento - 5 a 10 min
    • Acondicionamiento:
      • INTENSIDAD.- 50 a 70% Frecuencia Cardiaca Máxima
      • DURACION. - 20 A 40 MINUTOS
    • Período de Enfriamiento – 5 a 10 min
    • FRECUENCIA . - 3 a 4 Veces por semana
    Plan de Ejercicio Aeróbico
  • Indicación Terapéutica
    • Hipercolesterolemia:
        • Estatinas
        • Ac. Nicotínico y derivados
        • Resinas de Intercambio Iónico
        • Inhibidores de Absorción de Colesterol*
    • Hipertrigliceridemia:
        • Fibratos
        • Ac. Nicotínico y derivados
    • Hipercolesterolemia e Hipertrigliceridemia:
        • Estatinas
        • Fibratos
        • Inhibidores de Absorción de Colesterol*
        • Ac. Nicotínico y derivados
    * Su efecto es mejor al combinarse Si no hay respuesta se debe combinar medicamentos
  • Inhibidores de HMG-CoA Reductasa (Estatinas)
    • Estatina Dósis
    • Lovastatina 20–80 mg
    • Pravastatina 20–40 mg
    • Simvastatina 20–80 mg
    • Fluvastatina 20–80 mg
    • Atorvastatina 10–80 mg
    • Cerivastatina 0.4–0.8 mg **
    • Rosuvastatina 10 – 40 mg
    Modificado de NCEP: ATP III, 2001 **Fuera de mercado
  • Modificado de Alpízar y Cols. : p 95. Manual Moderno, 2001 **fuera de mercado 10-80 mg/d 0.4 – 0.8 mg/d ** 10, 20 mg tab 0.4 mg tab Lipitor Baycol Atorvastatina Cerivastatina 10 – 40 mg/d 10, 20 mg tab Crestor Rosuvastatina 20, 40 mg tab Canef 20-80 mg/d 20, 40 mg tab Lescol Fluvastatina 5-80 mg/d 5, 10, 20 mg tab Zocor Simvastatina 20-40 mg/d 20 mg tab Pravacol Pravastatina 20-80 mg/d 20 mg tab Mevacor Lovastatina Dosis Presentación Nombre Medicamento Características de las estatinas disponibles en México
  • Circulation 101:207-213, 2000 Am J Cardiol 81:582, 1998 EFICACIA COMPARATIVA DE ESTATINAS Efecto Estatina mg -25-35% 4-8% -54% --- --- --- --- --- 80 -20-30% 4-9% -48% --- 80 --- --- 80 40 -15-25% 4-8% -41% 0.8 40 --- --- --- 20 -10-20% 4-8% -34% 0.4 20 80 40 40 10 -10-15% 4-8% -27% 0.2 10 40 20 20 --- Triglicéridos HDL LDL Ceriv Simv Fluv Prav Lov Ator
  • Terapia con Drogas
    • Secuestrantes de Acidos Biliares
    • Acciones Mayores
      • Reducir LDL-C 15–30%
      • Elevar HDL-C 3–5%
      • Pueden incrementar Triglicéridos
    • Efectos Colaterales
      • Disconfort Gastrointestinal y/o constipación
      • Disminuye absorción de otras drogas
    • Contraindicaciones
      • Disbetalipoproteinemia
      • TG elevados (especialmente >400 mg/dL)
    NCEP: ATP III, 2001
  • Secuestrantes de Acidos Biliares
    • Medicamento Dosis
    • Colestiramina 4–16 g
    • Colestipol 5–20 g
    • Colesevelam 2.6–3.8 g
    NCEP: ATP III, 2001
    • Beneficios Terapeúticos demostrados
    • Reduce eventos coronarios mayores
    • Reduce mortalidad
    Secuestrantes de Acidos Biliares NCEP: ATP III, 2001 LRC, CPPT JAMA 251:351, 1984
    • Acido Nicotinico
    • Acciones Mayores
      • Disminuye LDL-C 5 – 25%
      • Disminuye TG 20 – 50%
      • Eleva HDL-C 15 – 35%
    • Efectos Colaterales: “flushing”, hiperglucemia, hiperuricemia, “disconfort” Gastrointestinal, hepatotoxicidad.
    • Contraindicaciones: Enfermedad hepática, gota severa, ulcera péptica.
    Terapia con Drogas NCEP: ATP III, 2001
  • Acido Nicotínico
    • Medicamento Dosis
    • Liberación Inmediata 1.5–3 g (cristalina)
    • Liberación Extendida 1–2 g
    • Liberación Sostenida 1–2 g
    NCEP: ATP III, 2001
    • Beneficios Terapeúticos Demostrados
    • Reduce eventos coronarios mayores
    • Posible reducción en mortalidad total
    Acido Nicotínico NCEP: ATP III, 2001 CDP J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. 8:1245, 1986 FATS Ann N Y Acad Sci. 748:407, 1995
    • Derivados del Acido Fíbrico
    • Acciones Mayores
      • Disminuír LDL-C 5–20% (con TG normales)
      • Puede elevar LDL-C (con TG elevados)
      • Disminuír TG 20–50%
      • Elevar HDL-C 10–20%
    • Efectos Colaterales: dispepsia, litiasis vesicular, miopatía.
    • Contraindicaciones: Enfermedad hepática o renal severa.
    Terapia con Drogas NCEP: ATP III, 2001
  • Modificado de Alpízar y Cols. : p 95. Manual Moderno, 2001 400-800 mg/d 400 mg tab Solibay 200 mg/d 600 – 1200 mg/d 100 mg tab 600 mg tab Controlip Lopid Fenofibrato Gemfibrozil 400-800 mg/d 400 mg tab Bezalip R 200-600 mg/d 200 mg tab Bezalip Bezafibrato 100 mg/d 100 mg comp Oroxadin Ciprofibrato 200 mg/d 100 mg tab Tricerol Etofibrato 1-2 g/d 500 mg cap Atromid S Clofibrato Dosis Presentación Nombre Medicamento Características de los fibratos disponibles en México
    • Beneficios Terapeúticos Demostrados
    • Reduce progresión de lesiones coronarias
    • Reduce eventos coronarios mayores
    Derivados del Acido Fíbrico NCEP: ATP III, 2001 WHO Br. Heart J. 40:1069, 1978 HHS NEJM 317: 1237, 1987 BECAIT Eur. Heart J 17(Supp F):37, 1996 BIP Eur. Heart J. 19(Supp H): 42, 1998 VA-HIT NEJM 341:410, 1999
  • Terapia con Drogas
    • Inhibidores de la Absorción Intestinal de Colesterol:
    • Ezetimiba
    • La acción la ejerce en las microvellosidades intestinales.
    • Inhibe absorción de colesterol de la dieta y de las sales biliares.
    • No afecta absorción de Tg, ni Vit´s.
    • Reduce principalmente Colesterol de LDL.
  • Inhibidores de la Absorción Intestinal de Colesterol
    • Nombres Comerciales:
      • Ezetrol
      • Zient
    • Efectos Indeseables:
      • Alteración de las P F H´s
    • Los fibratos son los fármacos de primera elección en el paciente diabético:
    • No modifican los niveles de glucosa.
    • Mejoran Sensibilidad a la Insulina.
    • Los niveles de TG deben ser <150 mg/dl.
    • Los niveles de C-HDL >45 mg/dl.
    • Debido a su excreción predominantemente renal su dosis debe reducirse en pacientes con nefropatía diabética.
    Hipertrigliceridemia y Diabetes Mellitus
  • Benefit Beyond LDL Lowering: The Metabolic Syndrome as a Secondary Target of Therapy
    • General Features of the Metabolic Syndrome:
    • Abdominal obesity
    • Atherogenic dyslipidemia
      • Elevated triglycerides
      • Small LDL particles
      • Low HDL cholesterol
    • Raised blood pressure
    • Insulin resistance (  glucose intolerance)
    • Prothrombotic state
    • Proinflammatory state
    ATP III, 2001
  • DAIS: Impact of Aggressive Therapy on Atherosclerosis in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes
    • Study population
    • N=418 (305 men, 113 women)
    • Type 2 diabetes
    •  1 minimal lesion on angiography
    • Mild elevations of LDL-C or TG + TC:HDL-C  4
    • Treatment
    • 8 weeks on Step I diet
    • Randomized, blinded to micronized fenofibrate (200 mg/d) and placebo
    • Primary end point
    • Progression or regression of CAD on quantitative angiography
    DAIS=Diabetes Atherosclerosis Intervention Study. Steiner G et al. Am J Cardiol . 1999;84:1004-1010.
  • DAIS: Mean Baseline Lipoprotein Levels mg/dL * Significant difference between genders. Steiner G et al. Am J Cardiol . 1999;84:1004-1010. P =0.0005* P =0.0001* P =NS P =NS 215 40 133 214 212 38 131 215 223 44 137 212 0 50 100 150 200 250 TC HDL-C LDL-C TG All Men Women
  • DAIS: Interim Lipid Results in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mean %  * P =0.0001. Steiner G. Diabetes . 1999;48(suppl 1):A2. Abstract 0005. 0.8 0.6 1.6 2.1 -9.0 6.7 -5.7 -27.2 -30 -20 -10 0 10 20 30 TC* HDL-C* LDL-C* TG* Placebo Fenofibrate
  • DAIS: Final Results in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes
    • CAD
    • Treatment with fenofibrate resulted in 40% reduction in rate of progression of localized CAD versus placebo
    • 23% reduction in combined coronary events following fenofibrate treatment ( P =NS*)
    • Lipids
    • Average reductions with fenofibrate: TC, 10%; LDL-C, 6%; TG, 29%; average increase in HDL-C, 6%
    • Safety
    • Very few serious adverse events; no significant differences in tolerability between fenofibrate and placebo treatments; 95% compliance
    *Researchers report that results suggest benefit to patients. Steiner G. XIIth International Symposium on Atherosclerosis; June 27, 2000; Stockholm, Sweden.
  • SCANDINAVIAN SIMVASTATIN SURVIVAL STUDY (4S) Diabetes Subgroup Analysis Reduction of LDL-Cholesterol Pyorala K et al. Cholesterol lowering with simvastatin improves prognosis of diabetic patients with coronary heart disease. Diabetes Care 1997;20:614-20. No Diabetes Diabetes n 4242 202 Baseline mmol/L 4.88 4.80 mg/dL 189 186 Reduction 34% 36%
  • SCANDINAVIAN SIMVASTATIN SURVIVAL STUDY (4S) Diabetes Subgroup Analysis Reduction of Major Recurrent CV Events Pyorala K et al. Cholesterol lowering with simvastatin improves prognosis of diabetic patients with coronary heart disease. Diabetes Care 1997;20:614-20. Years Since Randomization Proportion With Major CHD Event 0.60 0 0.50 0.40 0.30 0.20 0.10 0.00 1 2 3 4 5 6 Placebo Simvastatin Diabetes Years Since Randomization Proportion With Major CHD Event 0.60 0 0.50 0.40 0.30 0.20 0.10 0.00 1 2 3 4 5 6 No Diabetes Placebo Simvastatin Risk Reduction 32% P =0.0001 Risk Reduction 55% P =0.002
  • CARE TRIAL Diabetes Subgroup Analysis Reduction of LDL-Cholesterol by Pravastatin Goldberg RB, et al. Cardiovascular events and their reduction with pravastatin in diabetic and glucose-intolerant myocardial infarction survivors with average cholesterol levels. Subgroup analysis in the Cholesterol And Recurrent Events (CARE) Trial. Circulation 1998;98:2513-19. No Diabetes Diabetes n 3573 586 Baseline mmol/L 3.59 3.52 mg/dL 139 136 On Pravastatin 40 mg mmol/L 2.56 2.48 mg/dL 99 96 Reduction 29% 29%
  • CARE TRIAL Diabetes Subgroup Analysis Reduction of Recurrent CV Events Goldberg RB et al. Cardiovascular events and their reduction with pravastatin in diabetic and glucose-intolerant myocardial infarction survivors with average cholesterol levels. Subgroup analysis in the Cholesterol And Recurrent Events (CARE) Trial. Circulation 1998;98:2513-19. Years of Follow-up 0 Percent With Event 45 Placebo Pravastatin 1 2 3 4 5 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 0 Percent With Event 45 1 2 3 4 5 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Placebo Pravastatin No Diabetes Diabetes Risk Reduction 23% P <0.001 Risk Reduction 25% P <0.05
  • ATP III: Management of Diabetic Dyslipidemia
    • Primary target of therapy: identification of LDL-C; goal for persons with diabetes: <100 mg/dL
    • Therapeutic options:
      • LDL-C 100–129 mg/dL: increase intensity of TLC; add drug to modify atherogenic dyslipidemia (fibrate or nicotinic acid); intensify risk factor control
      • LDL-C  130 mg/dL: simultaneously initiate TLC and LDL-C–lowering drugs
    • TG  200 mg/dL: non–HDL-C* becomes secondary target
    Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. JAMA . 2001;285:2486-2497. Note: Diabetic dyslipidemia is essentially atherogenic dyslipidemia in persons with type 2 diabetes. *Non–HDL-C goal is set at 30 mg/dL higher than LDL-C goal.
  • Gracias