Medical Simulation Standards: What can we learn from DoD? Roger Smith, PhD, DM, MS, MBA Chief Technology Officer Florida H...
DoD has learned a lot in 25 years … SIMNET, 1989 VBS2, 2011
Military Simulation Elements Live Virtual Constructive Games
Simulation Standards System Design System Interoperability Model Ontology Shared Model Proxy Network Services Network Prot...
Standards in System Design From  Military Simulation and Serious Games , Roger Smith Infrastructure User Experience Hardwa...
Synthetic Environment <ul><li>Common and shared representation of the background field  </li></ul><ul><li>Eliminate duplic...
Models <ul><li>Structural building blocks for functionality </li></ul><ul><li>Object taxonomy for identity and relationshi...
User Interfaces  <ul><li>Data Creation – building and editing the virtual world </li></ul><ul><li>Data Presentation – perf...
Translators <ul><li>Every device speaks a different language </li></ul><ul><li>There is always a need for translation of b...
Standards in System Interoperability Common Model Ontology Shared Model Proxy Network Services Network Protocol Enumerations
Common Model Ontology <ul><li>A formal representation of knowledge as a set of concepts within a domain, and the relations...
Shared Model Proxy <ul><li>A representation that is a minimal, but essential substitute for the modeled object.  </li></ul...
Network Services <ul><li>Provided by a common software library that will perform actions in the same manner for everyone. ...
Network Protocol <ul><li>Simulation state information is encoded in formatted messages and exchanged between computers and...
Enumerations <ul><li>An exact listing of all of the elements in the set.  </li></ul><ul><li>These compactly encode data th...
Medical / Military Collaboration on Standards <ul><li>Are both communities prepared to collaborate?  </li></ul><ul><li>Are...
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Medical Simulation Standards: What can we learn from the DoD?

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Medical simulation is growing up in the shadow of advanced military simulation. The medical field can learn standardization and interoperability from the military, just as the entire gaming industry did in the 1990s.

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  • Title: Simulation in Surgical Education: Innovation to reduce training time, increase case access, increase expertise, and reduce errors   Description: This seminar will explore the use of simulation and virtual reality in surgical education. These tools have been shown to improve surgical skills and reduce errors, which both have a direct impact on the cost of education and surgical delivery. Modern computer and simulation technology is much more capable than just a few years ago and leading organizations are creating all of the pieces necessary to build effective surgical trainers that incorporate virtual reality and accurate models of the human body. Simulation, virtual reality, and game-based systems will be the next major modality in surgical education.   Presenter: Dr. Roger Smith has been a leading researcher and developers of simulations, virtual worlds, and game-based systems for over 20 years. He has worked on dozens of military simulation systems and is now focused on the surgical and healthcare domain. He has been on the faculty of four universities and is currently a Graduate Faculty Scholar at the University of Central Florida. He holds a PhD in computer science, a Doctorate in management, an MS in Statistics, and an MBA. He is currently the Chief Technology Officer for the Nicholson Center for Surgical Advancement at Florida Hospital.
  • The components within a simulation system support increasing complexity and allow the system to grow and spread over many computers. This diagram illustrates the most dominant functionality found in many major simulation products. A specific product will include additional layers or components to meet its specific needs, but the components shown here are found in some form in almost all large simulation products. 1) Hardware and Networks. 2) Operating System and Distribution Management. 3) Data Management. 4) Event and Object Management. 5) Time Management. 6) Synthetic Environment. 7) Models. 8) User Interfaces. 9) Translators.
  • Medical Simulation Standards: What can we learn from the DoD?

    1. 1. Medical Simulation Standards: What can we learn from DoD? Roger Smith, PhD, DM, MS, MBA Chief Technology Officer Florida Hospital Nicholson Center for Surgical Advancement [email_address] Slides Online at: Modelbenders.com Approved for Public Release.
    2. 2. DoD has learned a lot in 25 years … SIMNET, 1989 VBS2, 2011
    3. 3. Military Simulation Elements Live Virtual Constructive Games
    4. 4. Simulation Standards System Design System Interoperability Model Ontology Shared Model Proxy Network Services Network Protocol Enumerations Hardware Network Time Management Operating System Distribution Management Synthetic Environment Models User Interfaces Translators Data Management Event Management Object Management Simulation Management
    5. 5. Standards in System Design From Military Simulation and Serious Games , Roger Smith Infrastructure User Experience Hardware Network Time Management Operating System Distribution Management Synthetic Environment Models User Interfaces Translators Data Management Event Management Object Management Simulation Management
    6. 6. Synthetic Environment <ul><li>Common and shared representation of the background field </li></ul><ul><li>Eliminate duplication of the most common objects that are often the least dynamic </li></ul>
    7. 7. Models <ul><li>Structural building blocks for functionality </li></ul><ul><li>Object taxonomy for identity and relationships </li></ul><ul><li>These are the hardest and least advanced </li></ul>
    8. 8. User Interfaces <ul><li>Data Creation – building and editing the virtual world </li></ul><ul><li>Data Presentation – performance analysis </li></ul><ul><li>System Controls – operating the system </li></ul>
    9. 9. Translators <ul><li>Every device speaks a different language </li></ul><ul><li>There is always a need for translation of bits, words, packets, and forms </li></ul><ul><li>Standards for Interoperability can significantly reduce, but never eliminate this need </li></ul>ABGABCEBEBABCG -0+++--000++--+0-+0- 101101011101010011 
    10. 10. Standards in System Interoperability Common Model Ontology Shared Model Proxy Network Services Network Protocol Enumerations
    11. 11. Common Model Ontology <ul><li>A formal representation of knowledge as a set of concepts within a domain, and the relationships between those concepts. </li></ul><ul><li>Used to reason about the entities within that domain. </li></ul><ul><li>Required to allow models to interact with each other. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What are you? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How are you related? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What can I do to you? </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Shared Model Proxy <ul><li>A representation that is a minimal, but essential substitute for the modeled object. </li></ul><ul><li>Provides a least-common-denominator of state values that can be universally agreed upon. </li></ul>Who am I? 1) ~~~~~~ 2) ~~~~~~ 3) ~~~~~~ 4) ~~~~~~ 5) ~~~~~~ Who am I? 1) ~~~~~~ 2) ~~~~~~ 3) ~~~~~~ 4) ~~~~~~ 5) ~~~~~~ 6) ~~~~~~ Who am I? 1) ~~~~~~ 2) ~~~~~~ Who am I? 1) ~~~~~~ 2) ~~~~~~
    13. 13. Network Services <ul><li>Provided by a common software library that will perform actions in the same manner for everyone. </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces duplicate software and duplicate errors. </li></ul><ul><li>Increases standardization of actions, processes, and protocols </li></ul>Press 1 to send greetings Press 2 to send a bomb Press 3 to intercept calls Press 4 to jam all radios
    14. 14. Network Protocol <ul><li>Simulation state information is encoded in formatted messages and exchanged between computers and simulation systems. </li></ul><ul><li>One popular protocol (DIS 6) defines 67 different message types (PDUs), arranged into 12 families. </li></ul>ID: Sam Side: Red Health: 100% Weight: 100 KG Location: (12, 23, 17) Speed: 10 KPH Weapons: Sword
    15. 15. Enumerations <ul><li>An exact listing of all of the elements in the set. </li></ul><ul><li>These compactly encode data that needs to be understood by different computer programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Ground Vehicle = 100 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tank = 101 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Truck = 102 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Robot = 103 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Air Vehicle = 200 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fighter = 201 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tanker = 202 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cargo = 203 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Naval Vehicle = 300 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Carrier = 301 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Battleship = 302 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Terrain = 400 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>River = 401 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tree = 402 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bridge = 403 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Building = 404 </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Medical / Military Collaboration on Standards <ul><li>Are both communities prepared to collaborate? </li></ul><ul><li>Are they able to persist long enough to bridge differences in vocabulary, history, customer needs, funding, etc? </li></ul><ul><li>Simulation Interoperability Standards Organization </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Medical Simulation SIG </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Society for Simulation in Healthcare </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Committee on Technology and Standards </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Slides available at: Modelbenders.com </li></ul>
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