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Avoid Social Media and Electronic Meltdowns

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Learn how to avoid social media and electronic meltdowns. This lightning talk was originally presented at the 10th Anniversary of LavaCon Conference on Content Strategies and Digital Media

Learn how to avoid social media and electronic meltdowns. This lightning talk was originally presented at the 10th Anniversary of LavaCon Conference on Content Strategies and Digital Media

Published in: Education

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  • Hi everyone, my name is Roger Renteria. Thank you for taking the time to attend my Lightning Talk. Some of you may have heard about some social media and electronic meltdowns, but let me share with you some good lovely stories with you for the next 10 minutes.
  • Again, my name is Roger. I’m from Albuquerque, NM. I am a social media butterfly. You can ask me about social media, education, website management, computer gadgets, SCIENCE, photography. I have a lot of interests out there, if you and I talk for a few minutes after the conference, we will find common ground on something. I love talking about science, I have a Bachelors of Science in Technical Communication. General nerd, type 1.
  • Why might you learn and take away? Hope you all know everything about my presentation, but if not…you will find out. But these are some of the ways that you can minimize the damage done to Murphy’s Law. I live by trying to safeguard as much of my
  • Then this happens. You were working on a document and your computer crashes, you begin losing data, it keeps crashing. Luckily I don’t use PCs often except at work, so I wouldn’t necessarily get that. But your computer might not boot up at all. That then is a fatal problem in of itself. Who knows, you could suffer what happened to me during Adobe Day, which my iPhone battery died after a full night’s charge and I was super sad to see my favorite phone simply die. Luckily I made multiple backup copies on separate computers in the event my phone died. First thing you might fear years ago is that you lost all of your phone contacts and pictures. Don’t you wish you had backed those up or had an easy way to restore them? With iCloud (Android users can set up an account with Google for a similar experience), my frantic morning was not of a concern. I could restore my phone and download my entire address book and restore my photos. Not like I already backed them up on Google+ and Flickr too.
  • You can’t be dead in the water, that is a situation that no one want to be. Like this star fish I found in the coast of Oregon, west of Eugene, OR, I don’t want to wash up on the shore unprepared. Likewise, I want to ensure that when I’m working on materials that are critical for work or contracts, I do not want to be stuck having to redo hours upon hours of work.
  • One of the nice features of backing up your data into the cloud is that you have someone else store and keep your storage safe on their servers, where they manage the safety. How many of you have been saved because you backed up your files to another device, cloud service, or email?
  • People “Tweet the Darndest Things.” We all have seen it. But people post junk on Twitter, Facebook, you name it. It’s been said. Sometimes, the most damage is done by accident. You have to believe that people have accidentally posted pictures of themselves unclothed or questionable content intended for a completely different audience. Like I mentioned in a conference three years ago, whatever you post on the internet stays on there forever. The Library of Congress currently is archiving tweets as well. Anything of significance is definitely being saved on someone’s computer somewhere on the planet.
  • More accidental posts, or high profile posts of Twitter users posting things they should not have said, then the reaction coming from readers.
  • Programs like Hootsuite, TweetDeck, and others have nifty features for users who have multiple channels and multiple social media accounts that they need to publish simultaneously. While this is a great feature to have, without properly configuring it OR even looking to make sure you post to the right account, you can be in a serious world of hurt after pressing that “Submit” button. I love how that has caused a lot of accidental Tweets to be leaked out. Once you fire the first shot, you might not be able to take cover once the community on the Internet fires back.
  • One fateful day, there was a popular and well known technology columnist for Wired Magazine who recounted his story how he got hacked and nearly had his entire social and electronic life trashed all in the name of snagging a Twitter account name. Basically in one hour, his entire digital life was destroyed. Hackers found a way to hack into his account because he daisy-chained his accounts together which caused a cascade of events in which hackers socially engineered a way to gain access of his accounts. Someone had called Amazon to update his credit card and then turn around to reset his Amazon account. Afterwards, they reset his Apple ID with his real credit card info via tech support, which hackers were able to then reset his Gmail account, and again hackers reset his Twitter account. Once then, the hackers tore loose and started trashing everything, including remotely wiping both his iPhone AND MacBook. Basically his accounts and computer were trashed in the time you spent in this Lightning Talks session.
  • Always monitor your internet use. You might not realize that your favorite tools actually have logs of your session activities. If you notice suspicious behavior in one of your accounts, you can find out and stop it immediately before it can worse. Facebook, Google, and DropBox are examples in which you can disable certain devices, IPs or force all authenticated sessions to log back in before using the service.
  • Keep it cool. You don’t need to worry if meltdowns happen. Most importantly, it is how you react and alleviate the situation.
  • Set up a back up service, at least try to save your most important data before it is too late.
  • Don’t be like this guy, this doughnut got cursed and has a pretzel jammed in his body. You should have luck out there and keep on doing what you love best, working on your computer and posting happy updated on Facebook, Twitter, and the next new social media site.
  • Here’s my information again. I still have 30 seconds left to answer any questions.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Avoid Social Media and Electronic Meltdowns Roger Renteria Twitter: @RogerRenteria http://writetechie.com
    • 2. About Roger Renteria • From Albuquerque, NM • Ask me about social & digital media, education, website management, computer gadgets, • B.S. Technical Communication, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
    • 3. Key Learning Objectives• Learn how to minimize data loss• Understand, you have suffered or will suffer one day• Keep yourself safe!• Manage to minimize damage
    • 4. Practice Safe Activity (IT 101)• Lock your workstation• Log out of your accounts• Invent smart passwords• Monitor your online activity• Password recovery
    • 5. Dead in the water
    • 6. Back your data up often• Use the cloud• Embrace the cloud• Praise to the cloud???• Just keep it safe
    • 7. Don’t worry…
    • 8. “Don’t Tweet That”• Accidental Tweets• Unprofessional comments• Can turn into a firestorm
    • 9. Social Media Gone Wild
    • 10. Separate User Environments
    • 11. Dude, you got hacked Flickr: sunny1ee
    • 12. Be Vigilant
    • 13. Keep Reactions Cool• Address criticism eloquently• Don’t ignore it…• Acknowledge the mistake• Carry on with another topic Flickr: pittaya
    • 14. Recap• Set up a backup service• Separate your password recovery• Keep an eye out for suspicious activity• Be glad that your stuff is backed up
    • 15. Examples of Meltdowns• Mat Honan, Wired Magazine writer who was hacked http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2012/08/apple-amazon-mat-honan-hacking/• [Not Safe For Work] Newsroom reporter who accidentally tweeted topless photo [NSFW]:• http://gawker.com/5942663/newsroom-star-alison-pill-accidentally-posts-topless-pic-on-twitter-[nsfw]• Airplane Passenger arrested due to Facebook photograph hoax http://mobile.reuters.com/article/oddlyEnoughNews/idUSBRE88610N20120907• Facebook party invitation gone wild http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/09/22/14028638- thousands-descend-on-tiny-dutch-town-after-facebook-invitation-goes-viral?lite• Chrysler Twitter account accidental F-bomb http://www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/It_was_a_technical_glitch_Chrysler_Fbomb_tweeter_b_761 1.aspx• Local ice cream company’s accidental racist Facebook response http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2209655/Wilcoxsons-Ice-Cream-Company-accused- racism-Pakistan-comment-Muslim-customer.html
    • 16. Questions? Photo: Michael Opsteegh
    • 17. Avoid Social Media and Electronic Meltdowns Roger Renteria Twitter: @RogerRenteria http://writetechie.com