Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Business Process Optimization - Jan 2010

2,071

Published on

Think about your recent experiences in the airport screening line, the hospital ER, the “fast food” drive through or your neighboring department. Are they always pleasant? Sadly, not all processes …

Think about your recent experiences in the airport screening line, the hospital ER, the “fast food” drive through or your neighboring department. Are they always pleasant? Sadly, not all processes function smoothly – often to your customers’ dismay. Through business process optimization, your organization can strive for effectiveness and efficiency through innovation and flexibility. It doesn’t have to be a complicated endeavor – learn how! Presented to Rochester NY IIBA on 28 Jan 2010 by Laura Ribas of The Hartman Group

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,071
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
116
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. January 28, 2010 IIBA Rochester 1 January 28, 2010
  • 2. Upcoming Events Date Description Food! "Requirements Management Center of Excellence" (CoE) -- Joel Karczewski, Dinner event 5:30-7pm 11 March 2010 Assistant Vice President – - Sanibel Cottage Development from Paychex "Networking: The Whys and Hows" -- Dinner event 5:30-7pm 8 April 2010 Sue Schnorr and Emily Carpenter - Sanibel Cottage "Defining and Managing requirements Dinner event 5:30-7pm 13 May 2010 for the web" -- Mike Johnson, - Sanibel Cottage Pixelpunk Creative "Unify IT and Business Needs" -- John Magill from Consulting Portal Dinner event 5:30-7pm 17 June 2010 (http://consulting-portal.com/) - Sanibel Cottage IIBA Rochester 2 January 28, 2010
  • 3. Why Are We Here? Think about your recent experiences in the airport screening line, the hospital ER, the “fast food” drive through or your neighboring department. Are they always pleasant? Sadly, not all processes function smoothly - often to your customers’ dismay. Through business process optimization, your organization can strive for effectiveness and efficiency through innovation and flexibility. It doesn't have to be a complicated endeavor - learn how! IIBA Rochester 3 January 28, 2010
  • 4. Who Should be Interested? Everyone! A short list of sample engagements Nursing home/assisted living facility Aerospace ⇒ Admissions process ⇒ Systems test environments Financial services ⇒ Database maintenance ⇒ Capacity planning ⇒ Error resolution ⇒ Business development Records management ⇒ Client communications/ ⇒ Project management relationships Imaging systems ⇒ Quality assurance ⇒ Capacity planning Telecom provider Component manufacturer ⇒ Financial reporting ⇒ Procurement ⇒ Contract renewal ⇒ Production ⇒ Customer transition ⇒ Product quality assurance Retail apparel ⇒ Inventory management IIBA Rochester 4 January 28, 2010
  • 5. Business Process Development 101 IIBA Rochester 5 January 28, 2010
  • 6. Integrated Business Process Development: Definitions process, n: a series of actions or operations directed toward a particular result business, adj: associated with a commercial or industrial enterprise integrated, adj: to end the segregation of and bring into common and equal membership in an organization; to unite integrated business process development: to bring about a cross- functional, organization-wide, consistent way of doing work IIBA Rochester 6 January 28, 2010
  • 7. Integrated Business Process Development: Illustration #1 “Rising Demand for Larger Screen E-book Readers May Cause Shortage in 2010” In 2010, demand for larger screen e-book readers measuring 9.7 inches is expected to soar up to 320% year-on-year, says Digitimes Research. Marketing Customer Sales Service Logistics Production Inventory Management IIBA Rochester 7 January 28, 2010
  • 8. Mind the Gap of leaders cite boundary spanning as an important capability at the senior executive level (vs. 91% at the mid-management level and 43% at entry level) of senior executives agree that their peers are effective in working across boundaries (vs. 19% for middle managers and 8% at entry level) horizontal boundaries pose the greatest challenge (i.e., function and expertise) followed by geographic, demographic, stakeholder and vertical Source: “Boundary Spanning Leadership,” Jeffrey Yip, Chris Ernst and Michael Campbell, Center for Creative Leadership IIBA Rochester 8 January 28, 2010
  • 9. Mind the Gap (cont.) Who are you? And how do you see yourself? Individual Identity Spouse, parent, friend, sibling, manager, mentor, leader, American, conservative/liberal, etc. Relational Identity What is your relationship with others on your team? In your functional area? Across your company? Collective Identity Who are you as a team and, together, what are you attempting to accomplish? Source: “The Future of Leadership Development,” David V. Daya, Michelle M. Harrison, Lee Kong. Human Resource management Review, Volume 17, Issue 4, December 2007 IIBA Rochester 9 January 28, 2010
  • 10. Integrated Business Process Development: Why? Develop organizational capability and alignment Improve overall organizational efficiency and effectiveness Ensure high quality products and services Drive consistency, continuity and predictability of performance and results Increase agility and flexibility Emphasize process-dependency vs. people-dependency Reduce confusion and the level of frustration Maximize the ability to scale and grow Increase customer satisfaction IIBA Rochester 10 January 28, 2010
  • 11. Integrated Business Process Development: Illustration #2 Music Parts Plus, Founder and CEO Dominick Moreo “We reached $1.2 million in sales our first year, shipping about 200 packages a day,” says founder and CEO Dominick Moreo. “But we had an order error rate of close to 10%. That led to a reduction in repeat orders, unhappy customers and our overall expenses going sky high.” (Source: “Picking to Win,” Bruce Welty, Material Handling Management, November 2009 IIBA Rochester 11 January 28, 2010
  • 12. Integrated Business Process Development: Illustration #3 What Really Motivates Workers? Results! “Having just completed a multiyear study tracking the day-to-day activities, emotions, and motivation levels of hundreds of knowledge workers in a wide variety of settings, we now know what the top motivator of performance is . . . On days when workers have the sense they’re making headway in their jobs, or when they receive support that helps them overcome obstacles, their emotions are most positive and their rive to succeed is at its peak. On days when they feel they are spinning their wheels or encountering roadblocks to meaningful accomplishment, their moods and motivation are lowest.” (Source: “What Really Motivates Workers,” Teresa M. Amabile and Steven J. Kramer, HBR. January-February 2010) IIBA Rochester 12 January 28, 2010
  • 13. Integrated Business Process Development: Illustration #3 (cont.) IIBA Rochester 13 January 28, 2010
  • 14. Integrated Business Process Development: When? Reactive ⇒ Fix major problems or disconnects ⇒ React to internal and/or external changes ⇒ Increase client/customer/partner/satisfaction President Obama said that all the required intelligence arrangements were in place ⇒ Come into compliance with regulatory on Christmas Day (re: the requirements Christmas bomber); the only problem was a “failure to connect the dots.” IIBA Rochester 14 January 28, 2010
  • 15. Integrated Business Process Development: When? Proactive ⇒ Prepare for organizational development and growth ⇒ Proactively anticipate organizational and/or operational change requirements ⇒ Anticipate new regulatory requirements and/or mandates Our vision is to be the world’s biggest and best confectionery business. Our priorities are focused on four key areas – growth, efficiency, capabilities and sustainability. “A major group-wide cost and efficiency program across all aspects of our business - in sales and administration, in the supply chain, in the regions and at the group centre. We are aiming to reduce the complexity in our business and minimize duplicated activities” IIBA Rochester 15 January 28, 2010
  • 16. Process Improvement: From the Customer’s Viewpoint “Before working at Microsoft, I created a lot of presentations — and like everyone else at the time, I hand-cut graphs and glued them onto paper, sent the text to the typing pool and made glass slides to project on the wall. At the same time, I experimented with the latest computer technologies, figuring out how I could use them to analyze and present data. Trish May, Founder and CEO, At Microsoft, I started thinking about the painstaking Athena Partners processes I had used for those presentations. I wrote and presented a proposal to Bill Gates for a new piece of software for the personal computer, specifically to help people create presentations without all the scissors and paper.” Source: “The Road to the Cure,” New York Times, Sunday, January 17, 2010. IIBA Rochester 16 January 28, 2010
  • 17. Business Process Development: Assess (Current State) Plan Customer/ Assess Do Clients Verify IIBA Rochester 17 January 28, 2010
  • 18. Process Capability Maturity Model Accidental e ht g ni g a n a M . ) 9 8 9 1 ( stt a W , y e r h p m u H . y el s e W n o si d d A . s s e c o r P e r a wtf o S • Ad hoc • Minimal process • Not repeatable or predictable • Chaotic Awareness Stage 0 • Process in place and enabled • Focus on execution • Rigor and discipline • Performance measures utilized Stage 1 Predictable • Guidelines broadened • Repeatable • Leadership being developed • External benchmarking Stage 2 Managed • Alignment of goals • Informed decision-making • Cross-departmental leaders • Accountability Mastered Stage 3 • Business process as a core competency • Change proficiency • Integrated planning processes • Principles guide action IIBA Rochester 18 Stage 4 January 28, 2010
  • 19. Process Capability Maturity Model e ht g ni g a n a M . ) 9 8 9 1 ( stt a W , y e r h p m u H Accidental . y el s e W n o si d d A . s s e c o r P e r a wtf o S • Ad hoc • Minimal process • Not repeatable or predictable • Chaotic Awareness Stage 0 • Process in place and enabled • Focus on execution • Rigor and discipline • Performance measures utilized Stage 1 Predictable • Guidelines broadened • Repeatable • Leadership being developed • External benchmarking Stage 2 Managed • Alignment of goals Internet start-up – jump • Informed decision-making • Cross-departmental leaders in wherever needed • Accountability and make it work. Mastered Stage 3 • Business process as a core competency • Change proficiency • Integrated planning processes • Principles guide action IIBA Rochester 19 Stage 4 January 28, 2010
  • 20. Process Capability Maturity Model Accidental e ht g ni g a n a M . ) 9 8 9 1 ( stt a W , y e r h p m u H • Ad hoc . y el s e W n o si d d A . s s e c o r P e r a wtf o S • Minimal process • Not repeatable or predictable • Chaotic Awareness Stage 0 • Process in place and enabled • Focus on execution • Rigor and discipline • Performance measures utilized Stage 1 Predictable • Guidelines broadened • Repeatable • Leadership being developed • External benchmarking Stage 2 Managed • Alignment of goals “We have too many competing IT • Informed decision-making requests. Which is top priority? We • Cross-departmental leaders need everyone to follow a detailed • Accountability Mastered submission and approval process.” Stage 3 • Business process as a core competency • Change proficiency • Integrated planning processes • Principles guide action IIBA Rochester 20 Stage 4 January 28, 2010
  • 21. Process Capability Maturity Model Accidental e ht g ni g a n a M . ) 9 8 9 1 ( stt a W , y e r h p m u H . y el s e W n o si d d A . s s e c o r P e r a wtf o S • Ad hoc • Minimal process • Not repeatable or predictable • Chaotic Awareness Stage 0 • Process in place and enabled • Focus on execution • Rigor and discipline • Performance measures utilized Stage 1 Predictable • Guidelines broadened • Repeatable • Leadership being developed • External benchmarking Stage 2 Managed • Alignment of goals • Informed decision-making • Cross-departmental leaders • Accountability “Based on historical data and your Mastered documented assumptions, we can Stage 3 • Business process as a deliver a finished product in four core competency • Change proficiency days for a total cost of $10,000.” • Integrated planning processes • Principles guide action IIBA Rochester 21 Stage 4 January 28, 2010
  • 22. Process Capability Maturity Model e ht g ni g a n a M . ) 9 8 9 1 ( stt a W , y e r h p m u H Accidental . y el s e W n o si d d A . s s e c o r P e r a wtf o S • Ad hoc • Minimal process • Not repeatable or predictable • Chaotic Awareness Stage 0 • Process in place and enabled • Focus on execution • Rigor and discipline • Performance measures utilized Stage 1 Predictable • Guidelines broadened • Repeatable • Leadership being developed • External benchmarking Stage 2 Managed • Alignment of goals • Informed decision-making • Cross-departmental leaders “I signed the mission-critical contract • Accountability in your absence. It met all of our Mastered Stage 3 business objectives and allows us to • Business process as a core competency opt-out based on mutual • Change proficiency performance metrics that I defined.” • Integrated planning processes • Principles guide action IIBA Rochester 22 Stage 4 January 28, 2010
  • 23. Process Capability Maturity Model Accidental e ht g ni g a n a M . ) 9 8 9 1 ( stt a W , y e r h p m u H • Ad hoc . y el s e W n o si d d A . s s e c o r P e r a wtf o S • Minimal process • Not repeatable or predictable • Chaotic Awareness Stage 0 • Process in place and enabled • Focus on execution • Rigor and discipline • Performance measures utilized Stage 1 Predictable • Guidelines broadened • Repeatable • Leadership being developed • External benchmarking Stage 2 Managed • Alignment of goals • Informed decision-making • Cross-departmental leaders “I instated an emergency • Accountability Mastered closure and rerouted all activity Stage 3 • Business process as a to runway 7L/25R. This will core competency cause all aircraft to approach • Change proficiency • Integrated planning processes and take off from the east . . .” • Principles guide action IIBA Rochester 23 Stage 4 January 28, 2010
  • 24. Process Capability Maturity Model (cont.) Ad Hoc Alignment Guidelines Principles- “Anything Rules-based with Broadened Based Goes” Goals Stage 0 Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Accidental Awareness Predictable Managed Mastered Business Process Capability IIBA Rochester 24 January 28, 2010
  • 25. Assessing the Current State Define the Process Map the Process Objectives Scope Expectations Deliverables Measures Roles and Responsibilities IIBA Rochester 25 January 28, 2010
  • 26. Define the Process: Definitions Objectives ⇒ What are the objectives of optimizing this process? Scope ⇒ What does this process include? Not include? ⇒ The process begins… ⇒ The process ends… Deliverables ⇒ What are the process deliverables? Measures ⇒ What metrics will be utilized to measure/monitor improvements to this process? Roles and responsibilities ⇒ Process owner ⇒ Sponsors IIBA Rochester 26 January 28, 2010
  • 27. Define the Process: Example Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Weather Service (NWS) are considering plans to consolidate weather service offices Objective: The FAA seeks to improve aviation weather services provided at en route centers Scope: ⇒ All locations (including remote services): • 21 regional FAA, en route centers that control planes over the U.S. • The NWS Aviation Weather Center (Kansas City, MO) • 122 NWS weather forecast offices nationwide • 21 NWS central weather service units (at FAA en route centers providing 16 hours of services/7 days per week) ⇒ All technologies (e.g., weather/radar processors, terminals, displays) ⇒ All products and services (e.g., forecasts, advisories, briefings) Expectations: Fewer sites, reduced personnel costs and increased services (i.e., 24/7 provision) Source: “GAO-09-887T,” U.S. Government Accountability Office, July 16, 2009 IIBA Rochester 27 January 28, 2010
  • 28. Define the Process: Example (cont.) Deliverables ⇒ Defining a common outcome ⇒ Establishing joint strategies to achieve the outcome ⇒ Agreeing upon agency roles and responsibilities ⇒ Establishing compatible policies and procedures to operate across agency boundaries ⇒ Developing mechanisms to monitor, evaluate, and report the results of collaborative efforts Sample Measures ⇒ Service provision (hours/days in operation) ⇒ Forecast accuracy (for traffic management decisions) ⇒ Customer satisfaction (timeliness of data, number of complaints) Sample Roles and Responsibilities ⇒ The Joint Planning and Development Office is responsible for planning and coordinating with Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) to reduce duplication of efforts and ensure integration • Restructuring facilities • Transitioning technologies IIBA Rochester 28 January 28, 2010
  • 29. Assessing the Current State Define the Process Map the Process IIBA Rochester 29 January 28, 2010
  • 30. Map the Current State Process Document the current state process, not the desired future state (i.e., “what is” vs. “what you’d like it to be”). Involve a broad, cross-functional team. Use flowcharts, diagrams and/or graphics. Make it as visual as possible. ⇒ Include an appropriate level of specificity and detail. ⇒ Document roles/responsibilities and measures associated with key process steps. ⇒ Document key assumptions. Verify the process map with knowledge experts/key stakeholders. “I receive the information by fax “Sometimes I find a and key it into Excel.” “There are so many document on my desk versions out there, I never that could have been know what the customer there for weeks.” actually agreed to.” IIBA Rochester 30 January 28, 2010
  • 31. Map the Current State Process Document the current state process, not the desired future state (i.e., “what is” vs. “what you’d like it to be”). Involve a broad, cross-functional team. Use flowcharts, diagrams and/or graphics. Make it as visual as possible. ⇒ Include an appropriate level of specificity and detail. ⇒ Document roles/responsibilities and measures associated with key process steps. ⇒ Document key assumptions. Verify the process map with knowledge experts/key stakeholders. “Culture eats process for lunch” fo lanruoJ ,nheoH .J arabraB ”.hcnul rof ssecorp stae erutluC“ :ecrruoS e cr u o S ec uo S e cr u o S . 9 0 0 2 ll a F . t n e m e g a n a M n oit a m r of nI e r a c htl a e H IIBA Rochester 31 January 28, 2010
  • 32. Business Process Optimization Sub-teams Business process optimization sub-team(s) ⇒ Must have a clear charter, responsibility and accountability ⇒ Cross-functional/cross-departmental participation ⇒ Finite duration (i.e., development/transition of improved processes) ⇒ Enable the organization; not an alternative structure Roles and Responsibilities ⇒ Team Sponsor: Senior Leadership Team; provides resources and continuing support, removes barriers. ⇒ Team Leader: Coordinator, facilitator, provides focus and direction for team, ensures alignment with management objectives. ⇒ Team Members: Cross-organizational, may include partner/client representation, should include content expertise. ⇒ Subject Matter Experts: Invited on an as-needed basis. IIBA Rochester 32 January 28, 2010
  • 33. Map the Current State Process Document the current state process, not the desired future state (i.e., “what is” vs. “what you’d like it to be”). Involve a broad, cross-functional team. Use flowcharts, diagrams and/or graphics. Make it as visual as possible. ⇒ Include an appropriate level of specificity and detail. ⇒ Document roles/responsibilities and measures associated with key process steps. ⇒ Document key assumptions. Verify the process map with knowledge experts/key stakeholders. IIBA Rochester 33 January 28, 2010
  • 34. Sample Flowchart: Making Coffee Value Map Key VCR—Value creating Take out coffee VCO—Value consuming beans, grinder and NV—Non-value adding filter NV: 45 sec. Measure/scoop beans Pot No Wash and dry pot into grinder clean? VCO: 120 sec. VCO: 60 sec. Yes Place pot on coffee Grind beans maker VCR: 10 sec. NV: 10 sec. Fill coffee maker with Place filter in coffee water machine VCR: 20 sec. VCO: 20 sec. Press “on” switch. Pour ground beans Brew coffee into filter VCR: 120 sec. VCR: 5 sec. IIBA Rochester 34 January 28, 2010
  • 35. Analyze the Current State Process Is the process clearly understood? Have clear roles and responsibilities, related to the process, been established? Is the process consistently executed? Are metrics in place to measure/monitor organizational performance related to the process? Does the process deliver the expected results predictably and consistently? What part(s) of the process is working well? Not so well (i.e., gaps, disconnects, redundancies)? What is the level of satisfaction of all key stakeholders with the current state process? What is today’s level of process capability maturity? How important is the process to overall organizational performance? IIBA Rochester 35 January 28, 2010
  • 36. Business Process Development: Plan (Future State) Plan Customer/ Assess Do Clients Verify IIBA Rochester 36 January 28, 2010
  • 37. Develop an Improved Process Involve a broad, cross-functional team Review the analysis of the current state process (i.e., What’s working? What’s not working?) Brainstorm ideas for improvement ⇒ Stretch/challenge the team ⇒ How can you accomplish the same end result cheaper, faster, smarter? ⇒ Eliminate disconnects, hand-offs, redundancies ⇒ Simplify! Simplify! Simplify! Collect/review best practices (i.e., benchmarks) Generate/prioritize improvement recommendations ⇒ Augment with benchmarks and best practices ⇒ Ask customers, co-workers, partners for input ⇒ Consolidate list, assess impact, prioritize Map an improved process (i.e., desired future state) Verify with key stakeholders IIBA Rochester 37 January 28, 2010
  • 38. Dig Deep: The “5 Whys” “The fries we’re serving are cold (and not meeting corporate standards)” 1st Why: Because the heat lamps are not on. 2nd Why: Because when the heat lamp switch is turned on it trips the circuit breaker. 3rd Why: Because the power circuit has too many appliances on it (4 existing and 1 new), overloading it. 4th Why: Because the electrician did not design the circuit to carry 5 appliances. 5th Why: Because we didn’t undertake any planning upfront – including an environmental stress test. IIBA Rochester 38 January 28, 2010
  • 39. Sample Flowchart: Making Coffee Take 2 We eliminated steps Take out filter (e.g., measuring, grinding, containing pre- placing beans in filter, filling pot measured, pre- with water) ground beans VCO: 20 sec. We employed new technology (i.e., a self-filling coffee Place filter in coffee machine) machine with clean We added back-up (i.e., more pot than one coffee pot to ensure VCO: 20 sec. clean pot always available) We saved 5 minutes :50 Push “on” button to seconds off what was originally automatically fill a 6 minute :50 second process! maker with water VCR: 20 sec. IIBA Rochester 39 January 28, 2010
  • 40. Business Process Development: Do (Future State) Plan Customer/ Assess Do Clients Verify IIBA Rochester 40 January 28, 2010
  • 41. Implement the Improved Process Identify a process and/or a departmental champion Implement the revised process in a subset of the organization, if possible ⇒ ß-test (if appropriate) ⇒ Test/modify/test/modify ⇒ Document any/all changes Implement the improved process organization-wide ⇒ Ensure all stakeholders are involved and have bought in ⇒ Distribute process flowcharts, procedures, etc. ⇒ Train employees, if required ⇒ Document observations, comments, etc. IIBA Rochester 41 January 28, 2010
  • 42. Business Process Development: Verify (Future State) Plan Customer/ Assess Do Clients Verify IIBA Rochester 42 January 28, 2010
  • 43. Verify Results Stabilize the process Solicit input from all stakeholders Measure results vs. the baseline ⇒ Monitor routinely ⇒ Communicate/celebrate progress Continuously improve, as appropriate ⇒ Always look for a better way ⇒ Utilize a formal change process across departments ⇒ Keep all documentation current Communicate! Communicate! Communicate! IIBA Rochester 43 January 28, 2010
  • 44. Any Questions? IIBA Rochester 44 January 28, 2010
  • 45. X In Conclusion “Ask not what your country can do for you but what you can do for your country.” —John F. Kennedy “Ask not what your company can do for you but what you can do for your company (and, in return, yourselves).” —Jennifer Balonek, IIBA Member Thank you for inviting The Hartman Group to speak at your January IIBA event! IIBA Rochester 45 January 28, 2010

×