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Water Balance
 

Water Balance

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A quick and perhaps over-simplified description of the system that keeps the water balance in humans.

A quick and perhaps over-simplified description of the system that keeps the water balance in humans.

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Water Balance Water Balance Presentation Transcript

  • Water balance Another example of homeostasis
  • Kangaroo Rat lives in hot desert cc licensed flickr photo by ucumari: http://flickr.com/photos/ucumari/3955842320/
  • Little water in environment. Does not drink water! All water comes from breakdown of nutrients. cc licensed flickr photo by ucumari: http://flickr.com/photos/ucumari/3955842320/
  • Needs to conserve water. How? cc licensed flickr photo by ucumari: http://flickr.com/photos/ucumari/3955842320/
  • Behavioural - nocturnal (active at night, sleeps during the day cc licensed flickr photo by ucumari: http://flickr.com/photos/ucumari/3955842320/
  • Physiological - miminum water lost from urination. (5 times more concentrated that human urine) cc licensed flickr photo by ucumari: http://flickr.com/photos/ucumari/3955842320/
  • Also need to avoid having too much water. Excess water leads to thinner blood.
  • Thinner blood leads to reduced concentration of red blood cells (a.k.a. anemia). Not enough oxygen gets to the cells. cc licensed flickr photo by kingdesmond1337: http://flickr.com/photos/kingdesmond/2872482711/
  • If blood is really dilute, the red blood cells can rupture cc licensed flickr photo by kingdesmond1337: http://flickr.com/photos/kingdesmond/2872482711/
  • Water balance is maintained homeostatically. Sensor Control centre Effector
  • Sensors Hypothalmus - senses concentration of blood. Blood vessels - sense blood volume. If concentration is too cc licensed flickr photo by EUSKALANATO: http:// flickr.com/photos/17657816@N05/1971827663/ high or blood volume is low, sends signal to the ...
  • Controller Pituitary gland (right next to hypothalmus) If blood concentration is too high, it secretes vasopressin cc licensed flickr photo by EUSKALANATO: http:// flickr.com/photos/17657816@N05/1971827663/ (a.k.a. antidiuretic hormone a.k.a. ADH), a hormone that acts on the ...
  • Effector Kidneys ADH causes the kidney to reduce urine production. Water loss through kidneys is reduced. Brain The hypothalmus activates parts cc licensed flickr photo by Kaptain Kobold: http:// flickr.com/photos/kaptainkobold/273001185/ of brain that cause thirst.
  • What if there’s too much water? Hypothalmus The hypothalmus stops sending signals to thirst centres and to pituitary. Pituitary decreases ADH secreted. Kidneys release more water into urine